Bio

Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, Stanford University, ME-PHD (2013)
  • Master of Science, Stanford University, ME-MS (2010)
  • Bachelor of Science, Stanford University, PHYS-BSH (2008)

Publications

Journal Articles


  • A comprehensive model of magnetic particle motion during magnetic drug targeting INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MULTIPHASE FLOW Cherry, E. M., Eaton, J. K. 2014; 59: 173-185
  • Shear thinning effects on blood flow in straight and curved tubes PHYSICS OF FLUIDS Cherry, E. M., Eaton, J. K. 2013; 25 (7)

    View details for DOI 10.1063/1.4816369

    View details for Web of Science ID 000322521100026

  • THERMAL DISPERSION IN METAL FOAMS PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME/JSME 8TH THERMAL ENGINEERING JOINT CONFERENCE 2011, VOL 1 PTS A AND B Hoberg, T. B., Muramatsu, K., Cherry, E. M., Eaton, J. K. 2011: 883-889
  • Three-dimensional velocity measurements in annular diffuser segments including the effects of upstream strut wakes INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEAT AND FLUID FLOW Cherry, E. M., Padilla, A. M., Elkins, C. J., Eaton, J. K. 2010; 31 (4): 569-575
  • Particle size, magnetic field, and blood velocity effects on particle retention in magnetic drug targeting MEDICAL PHYSICS Cherry, E. M., Maxim, P. G., Eaton, J. K. 2010; 37 (1): 175-182

    Abstract

    A physics-based model of a general magnetic drug targeting (MDT) system was developed with the goal of realizing the practical limitations of MDT when electromagnets are the source of the magnetic field.The simulation tracks magnetic particles subject to gravity, drag force, magnetic force, and hydrodynamic lift in specified flow fields and external magnetic field distributions. A model problem was analyzed to determine the effect of drug particle size, blood flow velocity, and magnetic field gradient strength on efficiency in holding particles stationary in a laminar Poiseuille flow modeling blood flow in a medium-sized artery.It was found that particle retention rate increased with increasing particle diameter and magnetic field gradient strength and decreased with increasing bulk flow velocity.The results suggest that MDT systems with electromagnets are unsuitable for use in small arteries because it is difficult to control particles smaller than about 20 microm in diameter.

    View details for DOI 10.1118/1.3271344

    View details for Web of Science ID 000273172100021

    View details for PubMedID 20175479

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