Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Sports Medicine

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Sports Medicine, American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehab (2017)
  • Board Certification: Physical Medicine and Rehab, American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehab
  • Fellowship:Stanford University Sports Physical Med and Rehab Fellowship (2017) CA
  • Residency:Stanford University Physical Medicine and Rehabiliation (2016) CA
  • Internship:University of Nebraska Medical Center Internal Medicine Residency (2013) NE
  • Medical Education:University of Nebraska College of Medicine (2012) NE

Teaching

2017-18 Courses


Publications

All Publications


  • A Review and Proposed Rationale for the use of Ultrasonography as a Diagnostic Modality in the Identification of Bone Stress Injuries. Journal of ultrasound in medicine : official journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine Fukushima, Y., Ray, J., Kraus, E., Syrop, I. P., Fredericson, M. 2018

    Abstract

    Bone stress injuries are common in military personnel and athletes. The delayed diagnosis of a bone stress injury can lead to a more severe injury that requires a longer period of treatment. The early detection of bone stress injuries is a central part of management. Currently, the reference standard for detecting bone stress injuries is magnetic resonance imaging. However, the expanding use of point-of-care ultrasonography (US) may enable the early detection of bone stress injuries in the clinical setting. In this article, we review the US detection of bone stress injuries, as well as discuss the rationale for the use of US in the diagnosis of these injuries.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/jum.14588

    View details for PubMedID 29655254

  • Nutrition Goals Prioritized By Elite Endurance Runners Undergoing A Nutrition Education Intervention Barrack, M., Fredericson, M., Adam, T. S., Kraus, E., Kim, B., Singh, S., Kussman, A., Gravani, K., Ansari, Y., Miller, B., Nattiv, A. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2017: 852
  • Preliminary Results from a Prospective Study Using the Female Athlete Triad Cumulative Risk Assessment Kraus, E., Nattiv, A., Tenforde, A., Kussman, A., Barrack, M., Kim, B., Deakins-Roche, M., Mistra, N., Singh, S., Fredericson, M. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2017: 1098
  • Integrating Musculoskeletal Education and Patient Care at Medical Student-Run Free Clinics. PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation McQuillan, T., Wilcox-Fogel, N., Kraus, E., Ladd, A., Fredericson, M. 2017

    Abstract

    Student-run free clinics (SRFCs) have emerged as an important educational component of United States (US) medical schools. Despite the prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) problems presenting to SRFCs, students and clinics are often unprepared to diagnose and to treat common MSK complaints.We sought to determine the scope of diagnosis and treatment at a medical student-run free clinic specializing in musculoskeletal care using physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) residents. Secondary goals included reviewing student satisfaction and determining the appropriateness of the clinic in medical education.Retrospective chart review, anonymous online survey.Primary care, free student clinic affiliated with tertiary academic medical center.A total of 20 medical student volunteers, 6 PM&R residents, and 91 community patients.We established a musculoskeletal clinic as a specialty referral clinic for the 2 primary care SRFCs with institutional support from a partner medical school. We then reviewed clinical operations retrospectively using electronic medical records and student satisfaction based on an online survey.We analyzed patient demographics and chief complaints, referrals provided, and medical services rendered. We also used a 5-point Likert scale to assess student satisfaction.A monthly musculoskeletal referral clinic was established with the oversight of PM&R attendings and residents. The clinic received 91 referrals and managed 61 unique patients over a 2.5-year study period. The most common presentations to the clinic involved knee pain (n = 17, 27.9%) and back pain (n = 16, 26.2%). Pro bono relationships with community and institutional partners enabled all patients to receive medical examinations, physical therapy visits, plain film radiographs, and insurance consultations free of charge. Student satisfaction with teaching and patient care was high, with 19 of 20 students reporting their experience as "good" or "excellent."SRFCs represent an underused opportunity to enhance MSK education among medical students by treating a variety of common MSK complaints in an underserved population.To be determined.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmrj.2017.03.008

    View details for PubMedID 28389399

  • Poster 155 Higher Cumulative Risk Assessment Scores Are Associated with Delayed Return to Play in Division I Collegiate Distance Runners. PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation Kraus, E. A., Kim, B., Nattiv, A., Tenforde, A., Barrack, M., Deakins-Roche, M., Kussman, A., Singh, S., Morkos, J., Fredericson, M. 2016; 8 (9S): S212-S213

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmrj.2016.07.196

    View details for PubMedID 27672919

  • Piriformis Syndrome With Variant Sciatic Nerve Anatomy: A Case Report. PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation Kraus, E., Tenforde, A. S., Beaulieu, C. F., Ratliff, J., Fredericson, M. 2016; 8 (2): 176-179

    Abstract

    A 68-year-old male long distance runner presented with low back and left buttock pain, which eventually progressed to severe and debilitating pain, intermittently radiating to the posterior thigh and foot. A comprehensive workup ruled out possible spine or hip causes of his symptoms. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging neurogram with complex oblique planes through the piriformis demonstrated variant anatomy of the left sciatic nerve consistent with the clinical diagnosis of piriformis syndrome. The patient ultimately underwent neurolysis with release of the sciatic nerve and partial resection of the piriformis muscle. After surgery the patient reported significant pain reduction and resumed running 3 months later. Piriformis syndrome is uncommon but should be considered in the differential diagnosis for buttock pain. Advanced imaging was essential to guide management.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmrj.2015.09.005

    View details for PubMedID 26377629

  • Bone Stress Injuries in Runners. Physical medicine and rehabilitation clinics of North America Tenforde, A. S., Kraus, E., Fredericson, M. 2016; 27 (1): 139-149

    Abstract

    Bone stress injuries (BSIs) are common running injuries and may occur at a rate of 20% annually. Both biological and biomechanical risk factors contribute to BSI. Evaluation of a runner with suspected BSI includes completing an appropriate history and physical examination. MRI grading classification for BSI has been proposed and may guide return to play. Management includes activity modification, optimizing nutrition, and addressing risk factors, including the female athlete triad. BSI prevention strategies include screening for risk factors during preparticipation evaluations, optimizing nutrition (including adequate caloric intake, calcium, and vitamin D), and promoting ball sports during childhood and adolescence.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmr.2015.08.008

    View details for PubMedID 26616181