Bio

Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of California Berkeley (2011)

Stanford Advisors


  • Jin Li, Postdoctoral Faculty Sponsor

Research & Scholarship

Lab Affiliations


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Transcriptional profiling of aging in human muscle reveals a common aging signature PLOS GENETICS Zahn, J. M., Sonu, R., Vogel, H., Crane, E., Mazan-Mamczarz, K., Rabkin, R., Davis, R. W., Becker, K. G., Owen, A. B., Kim, S. K. 2006; 2 (7): 1058-1069

    Abstract

    We analyzed expression of 81 normal muscle samples from humans of varying ages, and have identified a molecular profile for aging consisting of 250 age-regulated genes. This molecular profile correlates not only with chronological age but also with a measure of physiological age. We compared the transcriptional profile of muscle aging to previous transcriptional profiles of aging in the kidney and the brain, and found a common signature for aging in these diverse human tissues. The common aging signature consists of six genetic pathways; four pathways increase expression with age (genes in the extracellular matrix, genes involved in cell growth, genes encoding factors involved in complement activation, and genes encoding components of the cytosolic ribosome), while two pathways decrease expression with age (genes involved in chloride transport and genes encoding subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport chain). We also compared transcriptional profiles of aging in humans to those of the mouse and fly, and found that the electron transport chain pathway decreases expression with age in all three organisms, suggesting that this may be a public marker for aging across species.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.0020115

    View details for Web of Science ID 000239494800016

    View details for PubMedID 16789832

  • A transcriptional profile of aging in the human kidney PLOS BIOLOGY Rodwell, G. E., Sonu, R., Zahn, J. M., Lund, J., Wilhelmy, J., Wang, L. L., Xiao, W. Z., Mindrinos, M., Crane, E., Segal, E., Myers, B. D., Brooks, J. D., Davis, R. W., Higgins, J., Owen, A. B., Kim, S. K. 2004; 2 (12): 2191-2201

    Abstract

    In this study, we found 985 genes that change expression in the cortex and the medulla of the kidney with age. Some of the genes whose transcripts increase in abundance with age are known to be specifically expressed in immune cells, suggesting that immune surveillance or inflammation increases with age. The age-regulated genes show a similar aging profile in the cortex and the medulla, suggesting a common underlying mechanism for aging. Expression profiles of these age-regulated genes mark not only age, but also the relative health and physiology of the kidney in older individuals. Finally, the set of aging-regulated kidney genes suggests specific mechanisms and pathways that may play a role in kidney degeneration with age.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pbio.0020427

    View details for Web of Science ID 000226099600020

    View details for PubMedID 15562319

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