School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 26 Results

  • Ash A. Alizadeh, MD/PhD

    Ash A. Alizadeh, MD/PhD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research is focused on attaining a better understanding of the initiation, maintenance, and progression of tumors, and their response to current therapies toward improving future treatment strategies. In this effort, I employ tools from functional genomics, computational biology, molecular genetics, and mouse models.

    Clinically, I specialize in the care of patients with lymphomas, working on translating our findings in prospective cancer clinical trials.

  • Philip Beachy

    Philip Beachy

    The Ernest and Amelia Gallo Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Function of Hedgehog proteins and other extracellular signals in morphogenesis (pattern formation), in injury repair and regeneration (pattern maintenance). We study how the distribution of such signals is regulated in tissues, how cells perceive and respond to distinct concentrations of signals, and how such signaling pathways arose in evolution. We also study the normal roles of such signals in stem-cell physiology and their abnormal roles in the formation and expansion of cancer stem cells.

  • Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Karel H. and Avice N. Beekhuis Professor in Cancer Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Clarke maintains a laboratory focused on two areas of research: i) the control of self-renewal of normal stem cells and diseases such as cancer and hereditary diseases; and ii) the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells. His laboratory is investigating how perturbations of stem cell regulatory machinery contributes to human disease. In particular, the laboratory is investigating epigenetic regulators of self renewal, the process by which stem cells regenerate themselves.

  • Tushar Desai

    Tushar Desai

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We investigate the cellular and molecular events that regulate proper development of the lungs, including how the gas exchange region is maintained and renewed throughout life. We apply this knowledge to dissect how dysregulation of these normal processes can cause or contribute to specific lung diseases like pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and lung cancer, and we are interested in uncovering how lung stem cells are regulated in the hopes of harnessing them as a regenerative therapy for patients.

  • Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory focuses on two main areas: 1) cancer stem cell biology and 2) novel biomarkers for identifying the presence of malignant cells (diagnostic), predicting outcome (prognostic), and predicting response to therapy (predictive). Areas of study include cancers of the lung, breast, and gastrointestinal system. Clinically I specialize in the treatment of lung cancer and applications of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and perform both prospective and retrospective clinical studies.

  • Robert W. Hsieh

    Robert W. Hsieh

    Instructor, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

    Bio Robert W. Hsieh, M.D. Ph.D. is a medical oncologist who specializes in the treatment of prostate cancer, bladder cancer, kidney (renal) cancer and testicular cancer as a member of Stanford's multi-disciplinary Urologic Cancer Program. Dr. Hsieh obtained his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Chicago (Pritzker School of Medicine) and subsequently came to Stanford to complete his Internal Medicine residency and Hematology and Oncology fellowship training (with a clinical focus on genitourinary cancers).

    Dr. Hsieh is also involved in laboratory-based research at Stanford's Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine with a particular interest in hormonal and targeted therapies. He has significant experience in pre-clinical cancer target/drug identification and validation. His past experiences include the development of novel protein-protein interaction assays, high-throughput small molecule screening and x-ray crystallography. His current research utilizes genetic techniques and unique organoid and patient derived xenograft mouse models to identify novel therapeutic targets for challenging cancers such as triple-negative breast cancer.

  • Kyle M. Loh

    Kyle M. Loh

    Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We have developed a strategy to generate fairly pure populations of various human tissue progenitors in a dish from embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We have delineated the sequential lineage steps through which ESCs diversify into various tissues, and in so doing, developed methods to exclusively induce certain fates at the expense of others. The resultant pure populations of tissue progenitors are the fundamental building blocks for regenerative medicine.

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