Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Emergency Medicine
  • International

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Assistant Director, International Visiting Scholars Program (2011 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Residency:Loma Linda University - School of Medicine (2008) CA
  • Board Certification: Emergency Medicine, American Board of Emergency Medicine (2010)
  • Medical Education:University of North Carolina School of Medicine (2004) NC
  • MPH, University of North Carolina, Global Health
  • BS, University of North Carolina, International Studies
  • BS, University of North Carolina, Spanish

Community and International Work


  • Nepal Ambulance Service, Kathmandu, Nepal

    Topic

    EMS Development

    Partnering Organization(s)

    NAS

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • EMRI, India

    Topic

    Post-Graduate Program in Emergency Care

    Partnering Organization(s)

    EMRI

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Physician Volunteer, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Topic

    HIV/Tuberculosis Medical and Hospice Care

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Mother Teresa's Home for the Sick and Dying Destitute

    Populations Served

    indigenous population- Addis Ababa

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Emergency Medicine Development, Solomon Islands

    Topic

    Administration/Medical Education

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Atoifi Hospital, Auki Hospital

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Public Health/Clinical Interventions, Iquitos, Peru

    Topic

    Teen Pregnancy/ Medical Care

    Partnering Organization(s)

    People of Peru Project

    Populations Served

    indigenous population Amazon basin

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • "Working with the Underserved", San Diego

    Topic

    Grant awarded to increase access to health care for homeless population

    Partnering Organization(s)

    UCSD Free Clinic Project

    Location

    California

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Interests include international development, human rights, healthcare disparities, wilderness medicine, administrative efficiency

Teaching

2014-15 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Educating Health Care Professionals on Human Trafficking PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY CARE Grace, A. M., Lippert, S., Collins, K., Pineda, N., Tolani, A., Walker, R., Jeong, M., Trounce, M. B., Graham-Lamberts, C., Bersamin, M., Martinez, J., Dotzler, J., Vanek, J., Storfer-Isser, A., Chamberlain, L. J., Horwitz, S. M. 2014; 30 (12): 856-861

    Abstract

    The US Department of State estimates that there are between 4 and 27 million individuals worldwide in some form of modern slavery. Recent studies have demonstrated that 28% to 50% of trafficking victims in the United States encountered health care professionals while in captivity, but were not identified and recognized. This study aimed to determine whether an educational presentation increased emergency department (ED) providers' recognition of human trafficking (HT) victims and knowledge of resources to manage cases of HT.The 20 largest San Francisco Bay Area EDs were randomized into intervention (10 EDs) or delayed intervention comparison groups (10 EDs) to receive a standardized educational presentation containing the following: background about HT, relevance of HT to health care, clinical signs in potential victims, and referral options for potential victims. Participants in the delayed intervention group completed a pretest in the period the immediate intervention group received the educational presentation, and all participants were assessed immediately before (pretest) and after (posttest) the intervention. The intervention effect was tested by comparing the pre-post change in the intervention group to the change in 2 pretests in the delayed intervention group adjusted for the effect of clustering within EDs. The 4 primary outcomes were importance of knowledge of HT to the participant's profession (5-point Likert scale), self-rated knowledge of HT (5-point Likert scale), knowledge of who to call for potential HT victims (yes/no), and suspecting that a patient was a victim of HT (yes/no).There were 258 study participants from 14 EDs; 141 from 8 EDs in the intervention group and 117 from 7 EDs in the delayed intervention comparison group, of which 20 served as the delayed intervention comparison group. Participants in the intervention group reported greater increases in their level of knowledge about HT versus those in the delayed intervention comparison group (1.42 vs -0.15; adjusted difference = 1.57 [95% confidence interval, 1.02-2.12]; P < 0.001). Pretest ratings of the importance of knowledge about HT to the participant's profession were high in both groups and there was no intervention effect (0.31 vs 0.55; -0.24 [-0.90-0.42], P = 0.49). Knowing who to call for potential HT victims increased from 7.2% to 59% in the intervention group and was unchanged (15%) in the delayed intervention comparison group (61.4% [28.5%-94.4%]; P < 0.01). The proportion of participants who suspected their patient was a victim of HT increased from 17% to 38% in the intervention group and remained unchanged (10%) in the delayed intervention comparison group (20.9 [8.6%-33.1%]; P < 0.01).A brief educational intervention increased ED provider knowledge and self-reported recognition of HT victims.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000345912500005

    View details for PubMedID 25407038

  • Implementing an emergency medical services system in kathmandu, Nepal: a model for "white coat diplomacy". Wilderness & environmental medicine Walker, R., Auerbach, P. S., Kelley, B. V., Gongal, R., Amsalem, D., Mahadevan, S. 2014; 25 (3): 311-318

    Abstract

    Wilderness medicine providers often visit foreign lands, where they come in contact with medical situations that are representative of the prevailing healthcare issues in the host countries. The standards of care for matters of acute and chronic care, public health, and crisis intervention are often below those we consider to be modern and essential. Emergency medical services (EMS) is an essential public medical service that is often found to be underdeveloped. We describe our efforts to support development of an EMS system in the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal, including training the first-ever class of emergency medical technicians in that country. The purpose of this description is to assist others who might attempt similar efforts in other countries and to support the notion that an effective approach to improving foreign relations is assistance such as this, which may be considered a form of "white coat diplomacy."

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.wem.2014.04.006

    View details for PubMedID 24954196

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