Bio

Bio


Dr. Edward Bender specializes in the treatment of adult cardiac abnormalities, including ischemic heart disease, structural and valvular disease, and arrhythmias. Additionally, he has an interest and expertise in General Thoracic and Vascular surgery. Dr. Bender currently works with organizations within the medical community to develop software to aid in the teaching and practice of medicine.

Clinical Focus


  • Thoracic Surgery

Academic Appointments


Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, Workforce on Clinical Education, Society of Thoracic Surgeons (2013 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Thoracic Surgery, American Board of Thoracic Surgery (1989)
  • Fellow, University of Chicago Medical School, Cardiothoracic Surgery (1988)
  • Fellowship:University of Chicago CTS Fellowship (1988) IL
  • Registrar, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, Scotland, Thoracic Surgery (1986)
  • Residency:University of Colorado Health Science Center (1985) CO
  • Resident, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Surgery (1985)
  • Medical Education:Wayne State University School of Medicine (1980) MI
  • MD, Wayne State University (1980)
  • BS, University of Michigan, Zoology (1976)

Research & Scholarship

Projects


  • Zwisch Thoracic Surgical Resident Evaluation, Multiple universities

    Mobile app and cloud-based data store to evaluate resident autonomy in the operating room.

    Location

    Chicago, Palo Alto, Corvallis

    Collaborators

    • Shari Meyerson, Associate Professor of Surgery, Northwestern University
    • Jay Zwischenberger, Professor of Surgery, University of Kentucky
    • Joel Sternbach, Surgery Resident, Northwestern University
    • Michael Rizzo, Medical Student, Washington University
  • CTSNet Videos & CTSNet TV

    Developed platform for mobile devices and Apple TV for presentation of surgical videos.

    Location

    Corvallis, OR

  • Adult Cardiac Risk Calculator

    Risk calculator for iOS devices which uses and has been validated for STS dataset 2.73.

    Location

    Corvallis, OR

    For More Information:

  • Congenital Heart Surgery: The Essentials

    Electronic iBook featuring text, images, echocardiograms, and surgical videos of congenital heart defects. This publication is designed for those with an interest in childhood heart disease.

    Location

    Corvallis, OR

    Collaborators

    • Umar Boston, Cardiac Surgeon, University of Tennessee
    • Gautum Singh, Cardiologist, Washington University

Publications

All Publications


  • The University of Minnesota Donor Lung Quality Index: A Consensus-Based Scoring Application Improves Donor Lung Use. Annals of thoracic surgery Loor, G., Radosevich, D. M., Kelly, R. F., Cich, I., Grabowski, T. S., Lyon, C., Michael Morrow, J., Bender, E. M., Billings, J., Hertz, M. 2016; 102 (4): 1156-1165

    Abstract

    A simplified and consensus-based donor scoring process could improve donor lung use.To develop the University of Minnesota Donor Lung Quality Index (UMN-DLQI), we used expert opinion to create an online survey that ranked 17 lung donor and recipient factors and graded their importance on a scale of 0 to 10. To arrive at consensus-based weights for each of the 17 factors, we used magnitude estimation (ME) methods. We performed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses to evaluate predictive value. An application (app) was developed to simplify the scoring process. A second review process was instituted for every donor offer with an UMN-DLQI score greater than 40 as of September 2014 (post-donor score era).Worldwide, 11 transplantation centers (including ours) completed our survey. Results showed strong consensus among transplantation physicians across disparate practices. UMN-DLQI scores greater than 40 provided a sensitivity of 89%, a specificity of 55%, and a positive predictive value of 52% for donor offer acceptance. Number of transplants (63 versus 48) and donor lung use (15.1% versus 8.9%; p = 0.02) were significantly better in the post-donor score era without a penalty in transplantation outcomes. There was a trend toward a lower incidence of any primary graft dysfunction within 72 hours (40% versus 75%; p = 0.06) with a UMN-DLQI greater than 40 but no difference in 30-day or 1-year survival.The UMN-DLQI scoring app is a simple tool for describing the attributes of a donor lung offer. More attention to scores greater than 40 safely improved donor lung use at a single institution.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2016.04.044

    View details for PubMedID 27492670

  • Rapid clinical evaluation: an early warning cardiac surgical scoring system for hand-held digital devices EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CARDIO-THORACIC SURGERY Badreldin, A. M., Doerr, F., Bender, E. M., Bayer, O., Brehm, B. R., Wahlers, T., Hekmat, K. 2013; 44 (6): 992-998

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new scoring system for the prompt recognition of clinical deterioration and early treatment in postoperative cardiac surgical patients.All consecutive adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery between 1st January 2007 and 31st December 2010 were included. The new score was calculated daily until intensive care unit (ICU) discharge. The score consists of 11 variables representing six different organ systems. Performance was assessed using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves and calibration tests.A total of 5207 patients with a mean age of 67.2 ± 10.9 years were admitted to the ICU after cardiac surgery. The operations performed covered the whole spectrum of cardiac surgery. ICU mortality was 5.9%. The mean length of ICU stay was 4.6 ± 7.0 days. The new score had an excellent discrimination with areas under the ROC curves between 0.91 and 0.96. Calibration was also excellent reflected by observed/expected mortality ratios ranging between 1.0 and 1.26.The new score is a simple and reliable scoring system to assess organ dysfunction in cardiac intensive care patients. It is designed especially for personal digital assistants to simplify and accelerate the process of risk stratification in cardiac surgical ICUs.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/ejcts/ezt232

    View details for Web of Science ID 000327432200005

    View details for PubMedID 23756348

  • Outcome prediction in cardiac surgery: the first logistic scoring model for cardiac surgical intensive care patients MINERVA ANESTESIOLOGICA Doerr, F., Badreldin, A. M., Bender, E. M., Heldwein, M. B., Lehmann, T., Bayer, O., Brehm, B. B., Ferrari, M., Hekmat, K. 2012; 78 (8): 879-886

    Abstract

    In the process of risk stratification, a logistic calculation of mortality risk in percentage is easier to interpret. Unfortunately, there is no reliable logistic model available for postoperative intensive care patients. The aim of this study was to present the first logistic model for postoperative mortality risk stratification in cardiac surgical intensive care units. This logistic version is based on our previously presented and established additive model (CASUS) that proved a very high reliability.In this prospective study, data from all adult patients admitted to our ICU after cardiac surgery over a period of three years (2007-2009) were collected. The Log-CASUS was developed by weighting the 10 variables of the additive CASUS and adding the number of postoperative day to the model. Risk of mortality is predicted with a logistic regression equation. Statistical performance of the two scores was assessed using calibration (observed/expected mortality ratio), discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve), and overall correct classification analyses. The outcome measure was ICU mortality.A total of 4054 adult cardiac surgical patients was admitted to the ICU after cardiac surgery during the study period. The ICU mortality rate was 5.8%. The discriminatory power was very high for both additive (0.865-0.966) and logistic (0.874-0.963) models. The logistic model calibrated well from the first until the 13th postoperative day (0.997-1.002), but the additive model over- or underestimated mortality risk (0.626-1.193).The logistic model shows statistical superiority. Because of the precise weighing the individual risk factors, it offers a reliable risk prediction. It is easier to interpret and to facilitate the integration of mortality risk stratification into the daily management more than the additive one.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000309080200004

    View details for PubMedID 22475805

  • CONTRAST ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY - A METHOD TO VISUALIZE CHANGES IN REGIONAL MYOCARDIAL PERFUSION IN THE DOG-MODEL FOR CABG SURGERY ANESTHESIOLOGY ARONSON, S., Bender, E., Feinstein, S. B., HEIDENREICH, P. H., Ellis, J., Dick, C., Roizen, M. F., Karp, R. B. 1990; 72 (2): 295-301

    Abstract

    The ability of contrast echocardiography to assess regional myocardial perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in a dog model for coronary artery bypass surgery was evaluated. Sonicated Renograffin-76 microbubbles (meglumin diatrigoate and sodium diatrigoate) were injected into an aortic root proximal to an aortic occlusion clamp root while dogs were on cardiopulmonary bypass, with the heart arrested in diastole. Echocardiographic contrast-enhanced regions of myocardial perfusion were easily visualized. Differences in contrast-enhanced myocardial regions depended on coronary artery occlusion or patency. The contrast-enhanced images of myocardial perfusion showed that, for a given myocardial segment of the supplying vessel, the presence or absence of contrast effect reliably predicted vessel occlusion or patency (P less than .01). In the future contrast echocardiography may allow the direct assessment of regional myocardial perfusion in the operating room.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990CL65000015

    View details for PubMedID 2301760

  • ESOPHAGOGASTRECTOMY FOR BENIGN ESOPHAGEAL STRICTURE - FATE OF THE ESOPHAGOGASTRIC ANASTOMOSIS ANNALS OF SURGERY Bender, E. M., WALBAUM, P. R. 1987; 205 (4): 385-388

    Abstract

    Eighty-nine patients who had resection of benign esophageal stricture with esophagogastrostomy were reviewed through medical records and by mailed questionnaire. The 30-day mortality rate was 8.9%. Seventy-six patients were available for follow-up for an average of 66.4 months (Group 1). Forty-three of these patients were followed up for longer than 5 years (Group 2). The incidence of postoperative heartburn in Groups 1 and 2 was 7.9% and 7.0%, respectively. The incidence of postoperative dysphagia in Groups 1 and 2 was 39.4% and 30.2%, respectively, with most episodes occurring within 2 years of operation. The vast majority of these patients required multiple esophageal dilatations over a long time. The high rate of restricture precludes support for the routine use of an esophagogastric anastomosis after resection of benign esophageal stricture.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1987G695700007

    View details for PubMedID 3566374

  • PREVENTION OF ALTERATIONS IN POSTOPERATIVE LYMPHOCYTE SUBPOPULATIONS BY CIMETIDINE AND IBUPROFEN AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY Hansbrough, J. F., ZAPATASIRVENT, R. L., Bender, E. M. 1986; 151 (2): 249-255

    Abstract

    Surgical procedures probably result in a temporary state of immunosuppression. Identification of functional lymphocyte subclasses using appropriate monoclonal antibodies appears to serve as a sensitive, accurate, and reproducible measure of immune status in patients in many disease states. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for lymphocyte surface markers and immunofluorescent assay, we quantitated lymphocyte subpopulations in patients undergoing surgical procedures. Cholecystectomy, colon surgery, and coronary bypass procedures all resulted in postoperative decreases in helper and inducer populations and increases in cytotoxic suppressor populations, with resultant depressions in the helper to suppressor lymphocyte ratio. Studies in an additional group of patients who underwent cholecystectomy demonstrated that these changes could be prevented by perioperative administration of ibuprofen and cimetidine. These results suggest that prostaglandins and histamines are involved in immunoregulatory events after major operation. The ability of specific pharmacologic therapy to prevent alterations in lymphocyte populations suggest that postoperative immunity may be preserved, hopefully leading to greater host resistance against infection and tumor dissemination.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986A254100014

    View details for PubMedID 3484914

  • POSTBURN IMMUNOSUPPRESSION IN AN ANIMAL-MODEL .4. IMPROVED RESISTANCE TO SEPTIC CHALLENGE WITH IMMUNOMODULATING DRUGS SURGERY ZAPATASIRVENT, R. L., Hansbrough, J. F., Bender, E. M., BARTLE, E. J., Mansour, M. A., Carter, W. H. 1986; 99 (1): 53-59

    Abstract

    We have previously demonstrated that certain pharmacologic agents administered to burned mice will restore cell-mediated immunity, as evidenced by measurement of delayed hypersensitivity responses and determination of splenic helper/suppressor lymphocyte ratios. These drugs are systemic cimetidine, ibuprofen, cyclophosphamide, and topical cerium nitrate. In the studies reported here we performed cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in burned mice as a measure of resistance to infectious challenge. Survival after CLP with a 23-gauge needle used for puncture was markedly decreased when performed on the tenth postburn day (normal 63.7%, 10 days postburn 20.0%; p less than 0.001), but survival was not decreased when CLP was performed on the fifth (60.0%; p not significant) or twenty-first postburn day (65.3%; p not significant). Animals were then treated with the four agents in carefully defined dosage regimens, and survival was again determined on the tenth postburn day. Survival figures with p values compared to burned, untreated animals: burn plus cimetidine 62.2%, p less than 0.0005; burn plus: ibuprofen 64.7% p less than 0.0003; burn plus cyclophosphamide 68.2%, p less than 0.0001; burn plus cerium nitrate 54.1%, p less than 0.004. Specific pharmacologic therapy in burned mice in dosage regimens that have been shown to improve cell-mediated immunity is also able to significantly improve resistance to subsequent infectious challenge.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986AYB7300008

    View details for PubMedID 2934837

  • Modulation of suppressor cell activity and improved resistance to infection in the burned mouse. journal of burn care & rehabilitation Hansbrough, J. F., Zapata-Sirvent, R. L., Peterson, V., Bender, E. M., Claman, H. N. 1985; 6 (3): 270-274

    View details for PubMedID 2954966

  • RESTORATION OF IMMUNITY IN BURNED MICE BY CIMETIDINE JOURNAL OF TRAUMA-INJURY INFECTION AND CRITICAL CARE Bender, E. M., Hansbrough, J. F., ZAPATASIRVENT, R., Sullivan, J., Claman, H. N. 1985; 25 (2): 131-137

    Abstract

    We have previously described a mouse model of postburn suppression of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Ear swelling (ES) in response to contact antigen challenge is depressed maximally 14 days following a 25% steam burn and recovers to control levels 3 weeks postburn. Splenic lymphocyte proliferation in response to Concanavalin A (Con A) is also depressed 14 days postburn. Splenic T-lymphocyte subset analysis with monoclonal antibodies for helper cells (Lyt 1.2) and suppressor cells (Lyt 2.2) reveals that T-helper cells reach a minimal level and T suppressor cells reach a maximum level 14 days postburn. The helper: suppressor ratio (HSR) reaches its nadir at day 14. Treatment of burned mice with low-dose cimetidine (2 or 10 mg/kg/day), but not high-dose (50 mg/kg/day), for 14 days restores CMI. Low-dose cimetidine also normalizes the HSR but does not effect postburn depression of mitogen responsiveness. Low-dose cimetidine probably restores CMI by inhibiting suppressor cells, whereas high doses provide more global inhibition. Recovery of mitogen responsiveness may require continued cimetidine presence in culture.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1985ACH9200008

    View details for PubMedID 3156251

  • PREVENTION OF SUPPRESSED CELL-MEDIATED-IMMUNITY IN BURNED MICE WITH HISTAMINE-2 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST DRUGS JOURNAL OF SURGICAL RESEARCH Hansbrough, J. F., ZAPATASIRVENT, R., Bender, E. M., Peterson, V. 1985; 39 (2): 150-156

    Abstract

    Thermal injury has been shown to suppress many aspects of both specific and nonspecific immune responses. We investigated the effect of two histamine H-2 antagonist drugs on cell-mediated immunity in burned mice, utilizing a method of quantitating the degree of contact sensitivity elicited to the antigen. 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB). Following sensitization by painting the abdomen with DNFB, animals were challenged 5 days later by painting the ears; subsequent ear swelling is a sensitive and reproducible measure of cell-mediated immunity. We have previously demonstrated that burned mice are maximally immunosuppressed 10 to 14 days following burn injury. In the present study we found that daily intraperitoneal administration of appropriate doses of the H-2 antagonists cimetidine (2 and 10 mg/kg/day) and ranitidine (2 and 10 mg/kg/day) resulted in maintenance of normal cell-mediated immunity in burned animals. Neither a lower dose of ranitidine (0.2 mg/kg/day) nor higher doses of cimetidine (20 and 50 mg/kg/day) restored immunity, and diphenhydramine, an H-1 antagonist, had no effect. There was no augmentation of contact sensitivity in unburned mice treated with cimetidine. The immunorestorative effect is probably secondary to antagonism of histamine H-2 receptors on suppressor T lymphocytes, and may reflect increased suppressor cell activity in burned mice; however, other mechanisms may be involved.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1985AND7100007

    View details for PubMedID 4021474

  • THE EFFECT OF HISTAMINE-RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS ON SPECIFIC AND NONSPECIFIC SUPPRESSION OF EXPERIMENTAL CONTACT SENSITIVITY JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY Mekori, Y. A., Bender, E. M., ZAPATASIRVENT, R., Hansbrough, J. F., Claman, H. N. 1985; 76 (1): 90-96

    Abstract

    We studied the effects of H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists on down regulation of contact sensitivity (CS) to dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB). Two H2 receptor antagonists, cimetidine and ranitidine, reversed the nonspecific immunosuppression of CS induced by burns. On the other hand, these two drugs did not affect the antigen-specific suppressor T cell-mediated tolerance to DNFB induced by dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Two H1 antagonists did not affect the down regulation of CS induced by either tolerance or burning. The differential sensitivities to histamine 2-receptor antagonists indicate that the mechanisms for nonspecific burn-induced immunosuppression are different from those for hapten-specific tolerance to DNFB.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1985AMV8400012

    View details for PubMedID 3159783

  • CHARACTERIZATION OF THE IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE EFFECT OF BURNED TISSUE IN AN ANIMAL-MODEL JOURNAL OF SURGICAL RESEARCH Hansbrough, J. F., ZAPATASIRVENT, R., Peterson, V., Wang, X., Bender, E., Claman, H., BOSWICK, J. 1984; 37 (5): 383-393

    Abstract

    The immunosuppressive effect of burned tissue was studied using a mouse burn model. To evaluate the immunologic status an in vivo measure of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) involving contact sensitization of mice by painting the skin with dinitrofluorobenzene was used; mice were challenged 5 days later by painting the ear with the same antigen. Ear swelling in response to antigenic challenge was used as a quantitative measure of CMI; diminution in ear swelling in treatment mice compared to sensitized, unburned control mice indicated the degree of immunosuppression. A full-thickness steam burn covering 20% body surface ares (BSA) was profoundly immunosuppressive as reflected by ear swelling of 45 to 60% of that found in normal mice; partial thickness burns and burns of 10% BSA extent were not significantly immunosuppressive. Transfer into unburned mice of burned skin equivalent in size to a 20% BSA burn eschar resulted in marked immunosuppression, but transfer of smaller amounts of burned skin, or of larger amounts of unburned skin and normal and burned liver tissue, did not produce immunosuppression. Mice receiving a very high-temperature (300 degrees C), dry burn were only slightly more suppressed than mice receiving a standard steam burn. Normal immunity was preserved in burned mice which received daily application of cerium nitrate to the wound for 7 days, but application of other topical agents commonly used in burn treatment did not preserve immunity. Postburn immunosuppression thus appears related quantitatively to toxic factors in burned skin, and these toxic factors can be abrogated in burned mice by the topical application of cerium nitrate.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1984TS32800007

    View details for PubMedID 6492780

  • ALTERED HELPER AND SUPPRESSOR LYMPHOCYTE POPULATIONS IN SURGICAL PATIENTS - A MEASURE OF POSTOPERATIVE IMMUNOSUPPRESSION AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY Hansbrough, J. F., Bender, E. M., ZAPATASIRVENT, R., Anderson, J. 1984; 148 (3): 303-307

    Abstract

    Although a wealth of evidence has suggested that cell-mediated immunity is suppressed after simple surgical trauma, there have been contradictory results using stimulation assays of lymphocyte function. We quantitated T-lymphocyte subsets in 11 patients undergoing routine cholecystectomy by immunofluorescence microscopy using specific monoclonal antibodies. T-helper to T-suppressor cell ratios were calculated on the preoperative day and the first postoperative day in all patients, and on the third or fourth postoperative day in five patients. Helper to suppressor ratios decreased in all patients on the first postoperative day (p greater than 0.01), but returned to within normal limits on subsequent days. Changes were due more to decreases in helper cells than to increases in suppressor cells, although changes in both populations were statistically significant. The measurement of T-cell subsets by antibody-specific labeling and immunofluorescence microscopy may prove to be a more sensitive, quantifiable, and reproducible assay of immune function in surgical or traumatized patients than use of stimulation assays. Measurements of specific helper and suppressor lymphocyte populations may prove useful in predicting morbidity and mortality, and may also help in studying the effect of immunomodulating agents on the immune response.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1984TG87600003

    View details for PubMedID 6236703

  • CONSERVATIVE MANAGEMENT OF SAND ASPIRATION - CASE-REPORT MILITARY MEDICINE Bender, E. M., Kashuk, J. L., Moore, E. E., HOPEMAN, A. R. 1984; 149 (2): 98-99

    View details for Web of Science ID A1984SD03500013

    View details for PubMedID 6427668

  • Prevention of post-burn alterations in helper and suppressor T-lymphocytes by cimetidine The Heart Surgery Forum Bender, E., Hansbrough, J., Whitefield, J., Anderson, J., Claman, H. 1984; 35: 166
  • STEROIDOGENIC EFFECT OF 17 BETA-ESTRADIOL IN RABBIT - STIMULATION OF PROGESTERONE SYNTHESIS IN PREMATURELY REGRESSING CORPORA-LUTEA ENDOCRINOLOGY Bender, E. M., MILLER, J. B., Possley, R. M., Keyes, P. L. 1978; 103 (5): 1937-1943

    View details for Web of Science ID A1978FV57600055

    View details for PubMedID 748025

  • SERUM PROGESTERONE IN PREGNANT RATS WITH ECTOPIC OR INSITU CORPORA-LUTEA - CORRELATION BETWEEN AMOUNT OF LUTEAL TISSUE AND PROGESTERONE CONCENTRATION BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION ELBAUM, D. J., Bender, E. M., Brown, J. M., Keyes, P. L. 1975; 13 (5): 541-545

    View details for Web of Science ID A1975BA39600008

    View details for PubMedID 1203409