Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Residency

Honors & Awards


  • RSNA Resident/Fellow Research Grant, Radiological Society of North America (2019-2020)
  • Moskowitz Research Grant, Stanford Department of Radiology (2017-2018)
  • Alpha Omega Alpha, Tufts University School of Medicine (2015)
  • George L. Howland Prize for Best Anatomy Dissection, Tufts University School of Medicine (2015)
  • William Dameshak Undergraduate Research Award, Tufts University School of Medicine (2015)
  • Howard Hughes Medical Fellowship, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Janelia Research Campus (2012-2013)
  • Phi Beta Kappa, Brandeis University (2010)

Professional Education


  • Internship, California Pacific Medical Center, Internal Medicine (2016)
  • MD, Tufts University School of Medicine (2015)
  • BS, Brandeis University, Neuroscience, Biology (2010)

Publications

All Publications


  • Longitudinal Changes in Hippocampal Subfield Volume Associated with Collegiate Football JOURNAL OF NEUROTRAUMA Parivash, S. N., Goubran, M., Mills, B. D., Rezaii, P., Thaler, C., Wolman, D., Bian, W., Mitchell, L. A., Boldt, B., Douglas, D., Wilson, E. W., Choi, J., Xie, L., Yushkevich, P. A., DiGiacomo, P., Wongsripuemtet, J., Parekh, M., Fiehler, J., Do, H., Lopez, J., Rosenberg, J., Camarillo, D., Grant, G., Wintermark, M., Zeineh, M. 2019
  • Achalasia With Tortuous Megaesophagus. Seminars in ultrasound, CT, and MR Wolman, D., Gayer, G. 2019; 40 (3): 275–77

    View details for DOI 10.1053/j.sult.2019.03.005

    View details for PubMedID 31200875

  • Longitudinal changes in hippocampal subfield volume associated with collegiate football. Journal of neurotrauma Parivash, S. N., Goubran, M., Mills, B. D., Rezaii, P., Thaler, C., Wolman, D., Bian, W., Mitchell, L. A., Boldt, B., Douglas, D., Wilson, E., Choi, J., Xie, L., Yushkevich, P., Digiacomo, P., Wongsripuemtet, J., Parekh, M., Fiehler, J., Do, H., Lopez, J., Rosenerg, J., Camarillo, D. B., Grant, G., Wintermark, M., Zeineh, M. 2019

    Abstract

    Collegiate football athletes are subject to repeated head impacts that may cause brain injury. The hippocampus is composed of several distinct subfields with possible differential susceptibility to injury. The purpose of this study is to determine whether there are longitudinal changes in hippocampal subfield volume in collegiate football. A prospective cohort study was conducted over a 5-year period tracking 63 football and 34 volleyball male collegiate athletes. Athletes underwent high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging, and automated segmentation provided hippocampal subfield volumes. At baseline, football athletes demonstrated a smaller subiculum volume than volleyball athletes (-67.77 mm3, P=.012). A regression analysis performed within football athletes similarly demonstrated a smaller subiculum volume among those at increased concussion risk based on athlete position (P=.001). For the longitudinal analysis, a linear mixed-effects model assessed the interaction between sport and time, revealing a significant decrease in CA1 volume in football athletes without an in-study concussion compared to volleyball athletes (volume difference per year=-35.22 mm3, P=.005). This decrease in CA1 volume over time was significant when football athletes were examined in isolation from volleyball athletes (P=.011). Thus, this prospective longitudinal study showed a decrease in CA1 volume over time in football athletes, in addition to baseline differences that were identified in the downstream subiculum. Hippocampal changes may have important implications for high-contact sports.

    View details for PubMedID 31044639

  • Can diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging alone accurately triage anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke patients to endovascular therapy? JOURNAL OF NEUROINTERVENTIONAL SURGERY Wolman, D. N., Iv, M., Wintermark, M., Zaharchuk, G., Marks, M. P., Do, H. M., Dodd, R. L., Albers, G. W., Lansberg, M. G., Heit, J. J. 2018; 10 (12): 1132-+
  • Can diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging alone accurately triage anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke patients to endovascular therapy? Journal of neurointerventional surgery Wolman, D. N., Iv, M., Wintermark, M., Zaharchuk, G., Marks, M. P., Do, H. M., Dodd, R. L., Albers, G. W., Lansberg, M. G., Heit, J. J. 2018

    Abstract

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients who benefit from endovascular treatment have a large vessel occlusion (LVO), small core infarction, and salvageable brain. We determined if diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) alone can correctly identify and localize anterior circulation LVO and accurately triage patients to endovascular thrombectomy (ET).This retrospective cohort study included patients undergoing MRI for the evaluation of AIS symptoms. DWI and PWI images alone were anonymized and scored for cerebral infarction, LVO presence and LVO location, DWI-PWI mismatch, and ET candidacy. Readers were blinded to clinical data. The primary outcome measure was accurate ET triage. Secondary outcomes were detection of LVO and LVO location.Two hundred and nineteen patients were included. Seventy-three patients (33%) underwent endovascular AIS treatment. Readers correctly and concordantly triaged 70 of 73 patients (96%) to ET (κ=0.938; P=0.855) and correctly excluded 143 of 146 patients (98%; P=0.942). DWI and PWI alone had a 95.9% sensitivity and a 98.4% specificity for accurate endovascular triage. LVO were accurately localized to the ICA/M1 segment in 65 of 68 patients (96%; κ=0.922; P=0.817) and the M2 segment in 18 of 20 patients (90%; κ=0.830; P=0.529).AIS patients with anterior circulation LVO are accurately identified using DWI and PWI alone, and LVO location may be correctly inferred from PWI. MRA omission may be considered to expedite AIS triage in hyperacute scenarios or may confidently supplant non-diagnostic or artifact-limited MRA.

    View details for PubMedID 29555872

  • Dual-Energy Computed Tomography Applications in Neurointervention. Journal of computer assisted tomography Wolman, D. N., Patel, B. P., Wintermark, M., Heit, J. J. 2018

    Abstract

    Dual-energy computed tomography (CT) combines the high spatial resolution of standard CT with the ability to improve contrast resolution, reduce artifact, and separate materials of different atomic weights and energy-based attenuation through postprocessing. We review the underlying physical principles and applications of dual-energy CT within the context of patients undergoing preprocedural and postprocedural evaluation for neurointerventional therapies. The broad imaging categories of cerebral ischemia and hemorrhage, head and neck angiography, and the spine are reviewed.

    View details for PubMedID 30052616

  • Recent advances in vertebral augmentation for the treatment of vertebral body compression fractures Curr Phys Med Rehabil Rep Wolman, D. N., Heit, J. J. 2017; 5 (4): 161-174
  • A large fraction of neocortical myelin ensheathes axons of local inhibitory neurons. eLife Micheva, K. D., Wolman, D., Mensh, B. D., Pax, E., Buchanan, J., Smith, S. J., Bock, D. D. 2016; 5

    Abstract

    Myelin is best known for its role in increasing the conduction velocity and metabolic efficiency of long-range excitatory axons. Accordingly, the myelin observed in neocortical gray matter is thought to mostly ensheath excitatory axons connecting to subcortical regions and distant cortical areas. Using independent analyses of light and electron microscopy data from mouse neocortex, we show that a surprisingly large fraction of cortical myelin (half the myelin in layer 2/3 and a quarter in layer 4) ensheathes axons of inhibitory neurons, specifically of parvalbumin-positive basket cells. This myelin differs significantly from that of excitatory axons in distribution and protein composition. Myelin on inhibitory axons is unlikely to meaningfully hasten the arrival of spikes at their pre-synaptic terminals, due to the patchy distribution and short path-lengths observed. Our results thus highlight the need for exploring alternative roles for myelin in neocortical circuits.

    View details for DOI 10.7554/eLife.15784

    View details for PubMedID 27383052

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4972537