Bio

Bio


Research involves development of improved methods for predicting the fatigue life of engineering materials, incuding the effects of manufacturing processes, and investigation of new approaches in the field of experimental mechanics, such as determination of residual stresses using optical methods.

Academic Appointments


Honors & Awards


  • Spergel Memorial Award, 32nd IWC Symposium (1984)
  • Hetenyi award, Society for Experimental Mechanics (1994)

Professional Education


  • PhD, Stanford, Mechanical Engineering (1978)

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Experimental Methods for Determining Residual Stresses and Strains in Various Biological Structures. Exp Mech Nelson, D. 2013

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11340-98606-6

  • Preparedness of the CTSA's Structural and Scientific Assets to Support the Mission of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) CTS-CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE Shamoon, H., Center, D., Davis, P., Tuchman, M., Ginsberg, H., Califf, R., Stephens, D., Mellman, T., Verbalis, J., Nadler, L., Shekhar, A., Ford, D., Rizza, R., Shaker, R., Brady, K., Murphy, B., Cronstein, B., Hochman, J., Greenland, P., Orwoll, E., Sinoway, L., Greenberg, H., Jackson, R., Coller, B., Topol, E., Guay-Woodford, L., Runge, M., Clark, R., Mcclain, D., Selker, H., Lowery, C., Dubinett, S., Berglund, L., Cooper, D., Firestein, G., Johnston, S. C., Solway, J., Heubi, J., Sokol, R., Nelson, D., Tobacman, L., Rosenthal, G., Aaronson, L., Barohn, R., Kern, P., Sullivan, J., Shanley, T., Blazar, B., Larson, R., FitzGerald, G., Reis, S., Pearson, T., Buchanan, T., McPherson, D., Brasier, A., Toto, R., Disis, M., Drezner, M., Bernard, G., Clore, J., Evanoff, B., Imperato-McGinley, J., Sherwin, R., Pulley, J. 2012; 5 (2): 121-129

    Abstract

    The formation of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) brings new promise for moving basic science discoveries to clinical practice, ultimately improving the health of the nation. The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) sites, now housed with NCATS, are organized and prepared to support in this endeavor. The CTSAs provide a foundation for capitalizing on such promise through provision of a disease-agnostic infrastructure devoted to clinical and translational (C&T) science, maintenance of training programs designed for C&T investigators of the future, by incentivizing institutional reorganization and by cultivating institutional support.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1752-8062.2012.00401.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000302860700005

    View details for PubMedID 22507116

  • The Association Between Neighborhood Characteristics and Body Size and Physical Activity in the California Teachers Study Cohort AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH Keegan, T. H., Hurley, S., Goldberg, D., Nelson, D. O., Reynolds, P., Bernstein, L., Horn-Ross, P. L., Gomez, S. L. 2012; 102 (4): 689-697

    Abstract

    We considered interactions between physical activity and body mass index (BMI) and neighborhood factors.We used recursive partitioning to identify predictors of low recreational physical activity (< 2.5 hours/week) and overweight and obesity (BMI ? 25.0 kg/m(2)) among 118,315 women in the California Teachers Study. Neighborhood characteristics were based on 2000 US Census data and Reference US business listings.Low physical activity and being overweight or obese were associated with individual sociodemographic characteristics, including race/ethnicity and age. Among White women aged 36 to 75 years, living in neighborhoods with more household crowding was associated with a higher probability of low physical activity (54% vs 45% to 51%). In less crowded neighborhoods where more people worked outside the home, the existence of fewer neighborhood amenities was associated with a higher probability of low physical activity (51% vs 46%). Among non-African American middle-aged women, living in neighborhoods with a lower socioeconomic status was associated with a higher probability of being overweight or obese (46% to 59% vs 38% in high-socioeconomic status neighborhoods).Associations between physical activity, overweight and obesity, and the built environment varied by sociodemographic characteristics in this educated population.

    View details for DOI 10.2105/AJPH.2011.300150

    View details for Web of Science ID 000301870000021

    View details for PubMedID 21852626

  • Review of Methods for Determining Residual Stresses in Biological Materials. In: Exp Appl Mech, Springer Nelson, D. 2012: 191-202
  • Method for efficient computation of stress intensity factors from weight functions by singular point elimination ENGINEERING FRACTURE MECHANICS Mawatari, T., Nelson, D. V. 2011; 78 (16): 2713-2730
  • Adipose levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and risk of breast cancer BREAST CANCER RESEARCH AND TREATMENT Hurley, S., Reynolds, P., Goldberg, D., Nelson, D. O., Jeffrey, S. S., Petreas, M. 2011; 129 (2): 505-511

    Abstract

    We conducted a case-control study to evaluate the risk of breast cancer associated with adipose concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) among women undergoing surgical breast biopsies in the San Francisco Bay Area of California (n=78 cases; 56 controls). Adipose tissue was analyzed for the five major congeners of PBDEs. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate age- and race-adjusted exposure-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Adipose levels of PBDEs were among the highest ever reported. Adjusted ORs for the highest compared with lowest levels of exposures were as follows: 0.56 (95% CI 0.19-1.68) for BDE-47; 1.19 (95% CI 0.35-4.10) for BDE-99; 0.91 (95% CI 0.33-2.53) for BDE-100; 0.52 (95% CI 0.19-1.39) for BDE-153; 1.67 (95% CI 0.44-6.29) for BDE-154; 2.04 (95% CI 0.45-9.20) for total BDEs. These results provide no evidence of an association between PBDE adipose concentrations measured at or near the time of diagnosis and breast cancer risk. Our study was limited by a small sample size. Given the high levels of PBDEs found in this population of California women, future studies are warranted. Such studies would benefit from a larger sample size, a more representative control series, and/or a prospective design.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10549-011-1481-7

    View details for Web of Science ID 000293634000019

    View details for PubMedID 21468638

  • Hole-Within-a-Hole Method for Determining Residual Stresses JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY-TRANSACTIONS OF THE ASME Makino, A., Nelson, D. V., Hill, M. R. 2011; 133 (2)

    View details for DOI 10.1115/1.4003496

    View details for Web of Science ID 000288807400020

  • Antibiotics for Both Moderate and Severe Cholera. NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Nelson, E. J., Nelson, D. S., Salam, M. A., Sack, D. A. 2011; 364 (1): 5-7

    View details for DOI 10.1056/NEJMp1013771

    View details for Web of Science ID 000285922600003

    View details for PubMedID 21142691

  • Cancer Incidence in Female Cosmetologists and Manicurists in California, 1988-2005 AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY Quach, T., Doan-Billing, P. A., Layefsky, M., Nelson, D., Nguyen, K. D., Okahara, L., Tran, A. N., Von Behren, J., Reynolds, P. 2010; 172 (6): 691-699

    Abstract

    Health concerns have been pronounced for cosmetologists and manicurists, who are exposed daily to cosmetic products containing known or suspected human carcinogens and endocrine disruptors. In this retrospective cohort study, the authors used probabilistic record linkage between California's statewide cosmetology licensee and cancer surveillance files to identify newly diagnosed invasive cancers among female workforce members during 1988-2005. Rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals for cancer among workforce members compared with the general female population in California were estimated via Poisson regression. For comparison, site-specific proportional incidence ratios were computed. The authors identified 9,044 cancer cases in a cohort of 325,228 licensees. Rate ratios for all sites combined suggested lower incidence among both cosmetologists (rate ratio = 0.84, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.82, 0.86) and manicurists (rate ratio = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.84, 0.90). Proportional incidence ratios were modestly elevated for thyroid cancer among all licensees (proportional incidence ratio = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.23) and for lung cancer among manicurists (proportional incidence ratio = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.36). Although there did not appear to be a cancer excess, these findings may be artifactually influenced by limitations in demographic information available from the licensee files. Additionally, the relatively young ages of cohort members and demographic shifts in the industry composition in recent years suggest a need for further follow-up.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/aje/kwq190

    View details for Web of Science ID 000281949100011

    View details for PubMedID 20693266

  • Inadequate Vitamin D Status in Adolescents with Substantial Bone Mineral Density Loss During the Use of Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Injectable Contraceptive: A Pilot Study JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC AND ADOLESCENT GYNECOLOGY Harel, Z., Wolter, K., Gold, M. A., Cromer, B., Bruner, A., Stager, M., Bachrach, L., Hertweck, P., Nelson, A., Nelson, D., Coupey, S., Johnson, C. C., Burkman, R., Bone, H. 2010; 23 (4): 209-214

    Abstract

    To examine vitamin D and parathormone (PTH) levels in adolescents who experienced substantial bone mineral density (BMD) loss during depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) use.A non-randomized, multi-center study, during which DMPA was administered every 12 weeks and evaluation of lumbar spine and hip BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was conducted every 6 months. A blood sample for vitamin D and PTH measurements was obtained from adolescents who experienced >5% BMD loss. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) level of <20 ng/mL, insufficiency as 25OHD level of 20-30 ng/mL, and sufficiency as 25OHD level of >30 ng/mL.Evaluation of vitamin D and PTH was carried out in 15 participants who experienced BMD loss of > or = 5% during DMPA use. At initiation of DMPA, participants had mean (+SE) age 17+1 years, gynecologic age 61+4 months, and body mass index 24+1.5 kg/m2. Racial/ethnic distribution was: Caucasian--7 girls, Hispanic--4 girls, African-American--3 girls, and other--1 girl. Six participants had BMD loss of >5% after 2 DMPA injections, five after 3 injections, one after 5 injections, one after 8 injections, one after 10 injections, and one after 13 injections. Only one girl (7%) had sufficient vitamin D. The other participants had vitamin D insufficiency (50%) or deficiency (43%). Participants' mean (+SE) PTH was 22+4 pg/mL (reference range 7-53 pg/mL), and mean (+SE) 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was 56+5 pg/mL (reference range 22-67 pg/mL).Inadequate vitamin D status was evident among the majority of female adolescents who experienced a substantial BMD loss while using DMPA.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jpag.2009.11.004

    View details for Web of Science ID 000279744200004

    View details for PubMedID 20471875

  • Compartmentalized Cyclic Adenosine 3 ',5 '-Monophosphate at the Plasma Membrane Clusters PDE3A and Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator into Microdomains MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE CELL Penmatsa, H., Zhang, W., Yarlagadda, S., Li, C., Conoley, V. G., Yue, J., Bahouth, S. W., Buddington, R. K., Zhang, G., Nelson, D. J., Sonecha, M. D., Manganiello, V., Wine, J. J., Naren, A. P. 2010; 21 (6): 1097-1110

    Abstract

    Formation of multiple-protein macromolecular complexes at specialized subcellular microdomains increases the specificity and efficiency of signaling in cells. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphodiesterase type 3A (PDE3A) physically and functionally interacts with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. PDE3A inhibition generates compartmentalized cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), which further clusters PDE3A and CFTR into microdomains at the plasma membrane and potentiates CFTR channel function. Actin skeleton disruption reduces PDE3A-CFTR interaction and segregates PDE3A from its interacting partners, thus compromising the integrity of the CFTR-PDE3A-containing macromolecular complex. Consequently, compartmentalized cAMP signaling is lost. PDE3A inhibition no longer activates CFTR channel function in a compartmentalized manner. The physiological relevance of PDE3A-CFTR interaction was investigated using pig trachea submucosal gland secretion model. Our data show that PDE3A inhibition augments CFTR-dependent submucosal gland secretion and actin skeleton disruption decreases secretion.

    View details for DOI 10.1091/mbc.E09-08-0655

    View details for Web of Science ID 000275433500023

    View details for PubMedID 20089840

  • Residual Stress Determination by Hole Drilling Combined with Optical Methods EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICS Nelson, D. V. 2010; 50 (2): 145-158
  • Validated High Speed Pull and Shear Test Methodologies to Evaluate Pb-Free BGA Mechanical Strength. In: 43d International Symposium on Microelectronics, International Microelectronics & Packaging Society Ahmad, M., Assudan, R., Nelson, Youssef, A. 2010: 110-118
  • Passive Smoking and Risk of Breast Cancer in the California Teachers Study CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION Reynolds, P., Goldberg, D., Hurley, S., Nelson, D. O., Largent, J., Henderson, K. D., Bernstein, L. 2009; 18 (12): 3389-3398

    Abstract

    Although recent reviews have suggested active smoking to be a risk factor for breast cancer, the association with passive smoke exposure remains controversial. This risk association was explored in a large prospective study of women, the California Teachers Study.Detailed lifetime information on passive smoke exposure by setting (home, work, or social) and by age of exposure was collected in 1997 from 57,523 women who were lifetime nonsmokers and had no history of breast cancer. In the ensuing decade, a total of 1,754 women were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) associated with several lifetime passive smoke exposure metrics.For all breast cancer, measures of higher lifetime passive smoking intensity and duration were associated with nonstatistically significant HRs of 1.11 to 1.14. For postmenopausal women, HRs for lifetime low, medium, and high cumulative exposure were 1.17 (95% CI, 0.91-1.49), 1.19 (95% CI, 0.93-1.53), and 1.26 (95% CI, 0.99-1.60). For women exposed in adulthood (age > or =20 years), risk was elevated at the highest level of cumulative exposure (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.00-1.40), primarily among postmenopausal women (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01-1.56). A statistically significant dose response was detected when analysis was restricted to women with moderate to high levels of passive smoke exposure.These results suggest that cumulative exposures to high levels of sidestream smoke may increase breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women who themselves have never smoked tobacco products.

    View details for DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0936

    View details for Web of Science ID 000272519800018

    View details for PubMedID 19959687

  • The on-orbit calibration of the Fermi Large Area Telescope ASTROPARTICLE PHYSICS Abdo, A. A., Ackermann, M., Ajello, M., Ampe, J., Anderson, B., Atwood, W. B., Axelsson, M., Bagagli, R., Baldini, L., Ballet, J., Barbiellini, G., Bartelt, J., Bastieri, D., Baughman, B. M., Bechtol, K., Bederede, D., Bellardi, F., Bellazzini, R., Belli, F., Berenji, B., Bisello, D., Bissaldi, E., Bloom, E. D., Bogaert, G., Bogart, J. R., Bonamente, E., Borgland, A. W., Bourgeois, P., Bouvier, A., Bregeon, J., Brez, A., Brigida, M., Bruel, P., Burnett, T. H., Busetto, G., Caliandro, G. A., Cameron, R. A., Campell, M., Caraveo, P. A., CARIUS, S., Carlson, P., Casandjian, J. M., Cavazzuti, E., Ceccanti, M., Cecchi, C., Charles, E., Chekhtman, A., Cheung, C. C., Chiang, J., Chipaux, R., Cillis, A. N., Ciprini, S., Claus, R., Cohen-Tanugi, J., Condamoor, S., Conrad, J., Corbet, R., Cutini, S., Davis, D. S., DeKlotz, M., Dermer, C. D., De Angelis, A., De Palma, F., Digel, S. W., Dizon, P., Dormody, M., do Couto e Silva, E., Drell, P. S., Dubois, R., Dumora, D., Edmonds, Y., Fabiani, D., Farnier, C., Favuzzi, C., Ferrara, E. C., Ferreira, O., Fewtrell, Z., Flath, D. L., Fleury, P., Focke, W. B., Fouts, K., Frailis, M., Freytag, D., Fukazawa, Y., Funk, S., Fusco, P., Garganov, F., Gasparrini, D., Gehrelscao, N., Germani, S., Giebels, B., Giglietto, N., Giordano, F., Glanzman, T., Godfrey, G., Goodman, J., Grenier, I. A., Grondin, M., Grove, J. E., Guillemot, L., Guiriec, S., Hakimi, M., Haller, G., Hanabata, Y., Hart, P. A., Hascall, P., Hays, E., Huffer, M., Hughes, R. E., Johannesson, G., Johnson, A. S., Johnson, R. P., Johnson, T. J., Johnson, W. N., Kamae, T., Katagiri, H., Kataoka, J., Kavelaars, A., Kelly, H., Kerr, M., Klamra, W., Knoedlseder, J., Kocian, M. L., KUEHN, F., Kuss, M., Latronico, L., Lavalley, C., Leas, B., Lee, B., Lee, S., Lemoine-Goumard, M., Longo, F., Loparco, F., Lott, B., Lovellette, M. N., Lubrano, P., Lung, D. K., Madejski, G. M., Makeev, A., Marangelli, B., Marchetti, M., Massai, M. M., May, D., Mazzenga, G., Mazziotta, M. N., McEnery, J. E., McGlynn, S., Meurer, C., Michelson, P. F., Minuti, M., Mirizzi, N., Mitra, P., Mitthumsiri, W., Mizuno, T., Moiseev, A. A., Mongelli, M., Monte, C., Monzani, M. E., Moretti, E., Morselli, A., Moskalenko, I. V., Murgia, S., Nelson, D., Nilsson, L., Nishino, S., Nolan, P. L., Nuss, E., Ohno, M., Ohsugi, T., Omodei, N., Orlando, E., Ormes, J. F., Ozaki, M., Paccagnella, A., Paneque, D., Panetta, J. H., Parent, D., Pelassa, V., Pepe, M., Pesce-Rollins, M., Picozza, P., Pinchera, M., Piron, F., Porter, T. A., Raino, S., Rando, R., Rapposelli, E., Raynor, W., Razzano, M., Reimer, A., Reimer, O., Reposeur, T., Reyes, L. C., Ritz, S., Robinson, S., Rochester, L. S., Rodriguez, A. Y., Romani, R. W., Roth, M., Ryde, F., Sacchetti, A., Sadrozinski, H. W., Saggini, N., Sanchez, D., Sander, A., Sapozhnikov, L., Saxton, O. H., Parkinson, P. M., Sellerholm, A., Sgro, C., SISKIND, E. J., Smith, D. A., Smith, P. D., Spandre, G., Spinelli, P., Starck, J., STEPHENS, T. E., Strickman, M. S., Strong, A. W., Sugizaki, M., Suson, D. J., Tajima, H., Takahashi, H., Takahashi, T., Tanaka, T., Tenze, A., Thayer, J. B., Thayer, J. G., Thompson, D. J., Tibaldo, L., Tibolla, O., Torres, D. F., Tosti, G., Tramacere, A., Turri, M., Usher, T. L., Vilchez, N., Virmani, N., Vitale, V., Wai, L. L., Waite, A. P., Wang, P., Winer, B. L., Wood, D. L., Wood, K. S., Yasuda, H., Ylinen, T., Ziegler, M. 2009; 32 (3-4): 193-219
  • The Genome of Nectria haematococca: Contribution of Supernumerary Chromosomes to Gene Expansion PLOS GENETICS Coleman, J. J., Rounsley, S. D., Rodriguez-Carres, M., Kuo, A., Wasmann, C. C., Grimwood, J., Schmutz, J., Taga, M., White, G. J., Zhou, S., Schwartz, D. C., Freitag, M., Ma, L., Danchin, E. G., Henrissat, B., Coutinho, P. M., Nelson, D. R., Straney, D., Napoli, C. A., Barker, B. M., Gribskov, M., Rep, M., Kroken, S., Molnar, I., Rensing, C., Kennell, J. C., Zamora, J., Farman, M. L., Selker, E. U., Salamov, A., Shapiro, H., Pangilinan, J., Lindquist, E., Lamers, C., Grigoriev, I. V., Geiser, D. M., Covert, S. F., Temporini, E., VanEtten, H. D. 2009; 5 (8)

    Abstract

    The ascomycetous fungus Nectria haematococca, (asexual name Fusarium solani), is a member of a group of >50 species known as the "Fusarium solani species complex". Members of this complex have diverse biological properties including the ability to cause disease on >100 genera of plants and opportunistic infections in humans. The current research analyzed the most extensively studied member of this complex, N. haematococca mating population VI (MPVI). Several genes controlling the ability of individual isolates of this species to colonize specific habitats are located on supernumerary chromosomes. Optical mapping revealed that the sequenced isolate has 17 chromosomes ranging from 530 kb to 6.52 Mb and that the physical size of the genome, 54.43 Mb, and the number of predicted genes, 15,707, are among the largest reported for ascomycetes. Two classes of genes have contributed to gene expansion: specific genes that are not found in other fungi including its closest sequenced relative, Fusarium graminearum; and genes that commonly occur as single copies in other fungi but are present as multiple copies in N. haematococca MPVI. Some of these additional genes appear to have resulted from gene duplication events, while others may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. The supernumerary nature of three chromosomes, 14, 15, and 17, was confirmed by their absence in pulsed field gel electrophoresis experiments of some isolates and by demonstrating that these isolates lacked chromosome-specific sequences found on the ends of these chromosomes. These supernumerary chromosomes contain more repeat sequences, are enriched in unique and duplicated genes, and have a lower G+C content in comparison to the other chromosomes. Although the origin(s) of the extra genes and the supernumerary chromosomes is not known, the gene expansion and its large genome size are consistent with this species' diverse range of habitats. Furthermore, the presence of unique genes on supernumerary chromosomes might account for individual isolates having different environmental niches.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.1000618

    View details for Web of Science ID 000271533500032

    View details for PubMedID 19714214

  • Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080916C SCIENCE Abdo, A. A., Ackermann, M., Arimoto, M., Asano, K., Atwood, W. B., Axelsson, M., Baldini, L., Ballet, J., Band, D. L., Barbiellini, G., Baring, M. G., Bastieri, D., Battelino, M., Baughman, B. M., Bechtol, K., Bellardi, F., Bellazzini, R., Berenji, B., Bhat, P. N., Bissaldi, E., Blandford, R. D., Bloom, E. D., Bogaert, G., Bogart, J. R., Bonamente, E., Bonnell, J., Borgland, A. W., Bouvier, A., Bregeon, J., Brez, A., Briggs, M. S., Brigida, M., Bruel, P., Burnett, T. H., Burrows, D., Busetto, G., Caliandro, G. A., Cameron, R. A., Caraveo, P. A., Casandjian, J. M., Ceccanti, M., Cecchi, C., Celotti, A., Charles, E., Chekhtman, A., Cheung, C. C., Chiang, J., Ciprini, S., Claus, R., Cohen-Tanugi, J., Cominsky, L. R., Connaughton, V., Conrad, J., Costamante, L., Cutini, S., DeKlotz, M., Dermer, C. D., De Angelis, A., De Palma, F., Digel, S. W., Dingus, B. L., do Couto e Silva, E., Drell, P. S., Dubois, R., Dumora, D., Edmonds, Y., Evans, P. A., Fabiani, D., Farnier, C., Favuzzi, C., Finke, J., Fishman, G., Focke, W. B., Frailis, M., Fukazawa, Y., Funk, S., Fusco, P., Gargano, F., Gasparrini, D., Gehrels, N., Germani, S., Giebels, B., Giglietto, N., Giommi, P., Giordano, F., Glanzman, T., Godfrey, G., Goldstein, A., Granot, J., Greiner, J., Grenier, I. A., Grondin, M., Grove, J. E., Guillemot, L., Guiriec, S., Haller, G., Hanabata, Y., Harding, A. K., Hayashida, M., Hays, E., Morata, J. A., Hoover, A., Hughes, R. E., Johannesson, G., Johnson, A. S., Johnson, R. P., Johnson, T. J., Johnson, W. N., Kamae, T., Katagiri, H., Kataoka, J., Kavelaars, A., Kawai, N., Kelly, H., Kennea, J., Kerr, M., Kippen, R. M., Knoedlseder, J., Kocevski, D., Kocian, M. L., Komin, N., Kouveliotou, C., KUEHN, F., Kuss, M., Lande, J., Landriu, D., Larsson, S., Latronico, L., Lavalley, C., Lee, B., Lee, S., Lemoine-Goumard, M., Lichti, G. G., Longo, F., Loparco, F., Lott, B., Lovellette, M. N., Lubrano, P., Madejski, G. M., Makeev, A., Marangelli, B., Mazziotta, M. N., McBreen, S., McEnery, J. E., McGlynn, S., Meegan, C., Meszaros, P., Meurer, C., Michelson, P. F., Minuti, M., Mirizzi, N., Mitthumsiri, W., Mizuno, T., Moiseev, A. A., Monte, C., Monzani, M. E., Moretti, E., Morselli, A., Moskalenko, I. V., Murgia, S., Nakamori, T., Nelson, D., Nolan, P. L., Norris, J. P., Nuss, E., Ohno, M., Ohsugi, T., Okumura, A., Omodei, N., Orlando, E., Ormes, J. F., Ozaki, M., Paciesas, W. S., Paneque, D., Panetta, J. H., Parent, D., Pelassa, V., Pepe, M., Perri, M., Pesce-Rollins, M., Petrosian, V., Pinchera, M., Piron, F., Porter, T. A., Preece, R., Raino, S., Ramirez-Ruiz, E., Rando, R., Rapposelli, E., Razzano, M., Razzaque, S., Rea, N., Reimer, A., Reimer, O., Reposeur, T., Reyes, L. C., Ritz, S., Rochester, L. S., Rodriguez, A. Y., Roth, M., Ryde, F., Sadrozinski, H. W., Sanchez, D., Sander, A., Parkinson, P. M., Scargle, J. D., SCHALK, T. L., Segal, K. N., Sgro, C., Shimokawabe, T., SISKIND, E. J., Smith, D. A., Smith, P. D., Spandre, G., Spinelli, P., Stamatikos, M., Starck, J., Stecker, F. W., Steinle, H., STEPHENS, T. E., Strickman, M. S., Suson, D. J., Tagliaferri, G., Tajima, H., Takahashi, H., Takahashi, T., Tanaka, T., Tenze, A., Thayer, J. B., Thayer, J. G., Thompson, D. J., Tibaldo, L., Torres, D. F., Tosti, G., Tramacere, A., Turri, M., Tuvi, S., Usher, T. L., van der Horst, A. J., Vigiani, L., Vilchez, N., Vitale, V., von Kienlin, A., Waite, A. P., Williams, D. A., Wilson-Hodge, C., Winer, B. L., Wood, K. S., Wu, X. F., Yamazaki, R., Ylinen, T., Ziegler, M. 2009; 323 (5922): 1688-1693

    Abstract

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass.

    View details for DOI 10.1126/science.1169101

    View details for Web of Science ID 000264559800029

    View details for PubMedID 19228997

  • A multi-parameter Bragg grating fiber optic sensor and triaxial strain measurement SMART MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES Mawatari, T., Nelson, D. 2008; 17 (3)
  • Longitudinal study of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera (R)) effects on bone health in adolescents: study design, population characteristics and baseline bone mineral density CONTRACEPTION Johnson, C. C., Burkman, R. T., Gold, M. A., Brown, R. T., Harel, Z., Bruner, A., Stager, M., Bachrach, L. K., Hertweck, S. P., Nelson, A. L., Nelson, D. A., Coupey, S. M., McLeod, A., Bone, H. G. 2008; 77 (4): 239-248

    Abstract

    This analysis was conducted to assess the baseline data and design methodology within an observational longitudinal comparison of use vs. nonuse of the injectable (intramuscular) contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-IM) and its effect on bone mass in adolescent women.A prospective, observational, open-label, unmatched-cohort, safety study in females aged 11-18 years. Participants either self-selected DMPA-IM (Depo-Provera) 150 mg to be administered every 12 weeks for up to 240 weeks with a 120-week post-treatment follow-up or were nonusers (users of nonhormonal contraception or sexually abstinent) who were to be followed up for up to 360 weeks. As each participant entered the study, bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine, hip and femoral neck regions, along with total body bone mineral content; serum and urine specimens were obtained for assay of bone metabolism markers and participants' histories of parity and tobacco and alcohol use were obtained.A total of 389 participants were enrolled: 169 elected to begin DMPA-IM; 26 chose nonhormonal methods and 194 were abstinent. The baseline characteristics indicated significant disparities between DMPA-IM users and nonusers: compared with the nonusers, DMPA-IM users had more advanced chronologic and gynecologic ages, were more likely to have smoked, been pregnant and included more blacks. These factors would likely influence bone accretion rates independent of DMPA-IM exposure. Comparison of participant BMDs with standard reference data revealed that the study cohorts did not match reference populations closely enough to make a direct between-cohort comparative analysis feasible.The baseline differences in cohort characteristics preclude a meaningful comparison of mean BMD changes over time between DMPA-IM users and nonusers cohorts, and comparisons of changes in Z-scores between cohorts were also not appropriate. Therefore, within-participant BMD decreases from baseline were established as safety thresholds, and the proportion of individuals crossing those thresholds on a persistent or progressive basis was identified as the revised primary end point.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.contraception.2007.11.002

    View details for Web of Science ID 000254502900004

    View details for PubMedID 18342646

  • Environmental tests of the flight GLAST LAT tracker towers NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Bagagli, R., Baldini, L., Bellazzini, R., Barblellini, G., Belli, F., Borden, T., Brez, A., Brigida, M., Caliandro, G. A., Cecchi, C., Cohen-Tanugi, J., De Angelis, A., DRELL, P., Favuzzi, C., Fusco, P., Gargano, F., Germani, S., Giglietto, N., Giordano, F., Goodman, J., Himel, T., Hirayarna, M., Johnson, R. P., Katagiri, H., Kataoka, J., Kawai, N., Kroeger, W., Ku, J., Kuss, M., Latronico, L., Longo, F., Loparco, F., Lubrano, P., Marangelli, B., Marcucci, F., Marchetti, M., Massai, M. M., Mazziotta, M. N., Minori, M., Minuti, M., Mirizzi, N., Mongelli, M., Monte, C., Morselli, A., Nelson, D., Nordby, M., Omodei, N., Pepe, M., Pesce-Rollins, M., Raino, S., Rando, R., Razzano, M., Rich, D., Scolieri, G., Sgro, C., Spandre, G., Spinelli, P., Sugizaki, M., Takahashi, H., Tenze, A., Young, C. 2008; 584 (2-3): 358-373
  • Design and initial tests of the Tracker-converter of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope ASTROPARTICLE PHYSICS Atwood, W. B., Bagagli, R., Baldini, L., Bellazzini, R., Barbiellini, G., Belli, F., Borden, T., Brez, A., Brigida, M., Caliandro, G. A., Cecchi, C., Cohen-Tanugi, J., De Angelis, A., DRELL, P., Favuzzi, C., Fukazawa, Y., Fusco, P., Gargano, F., Germani, S., Giannitrapani, R., Giglietto, N., Giordano, F., Himel, T., Hirayama, M., Johnson, R. P., Katagiri, H., Kataoka, J., Kawai, N., Kroeger, W., Kuss, M., Latronico, L., Longo, F., Loparco, F., Lubrano, P., Massai, M. M., Mazziotta, M. N., Minuti, M., Mizuno, T., Morselli, A., Nelson, D., Nordby, M., Ohsugi, T., Omodei, N., Ozaki, M., Pepe, M., Raino, S., Rando, R., Razzano, M., Rich, D., Sadrozinski, H. W., Scolieri, G., Sgro, C., Spandre, G., Spinelli, P., Sugizaki, M., Tajima, H., Takahashi, H., Takahashi, T., Yoshida, S., Young, C., Ziegler, M. 2007; 28 (4-5): 422-434
  • The Chlamydomonas genome reveals the evolution of key animal and plant functions SCIENCE Merchant, S. S., Prochnik, S. E., Vallon, O., Harris, E. H., Karpowicz, S. J., Witman, G. B., Terry, A., Salamov, A., Fritz-Laylin, L. K., Marechal-Drouard, L., Marshall, W. F., Qu, L., Nelson, D. R., Sanderfoot, A. A., Spalding, M. H., Kapitonov, V. V., Ren, Q., Ferris, P., Lindquist, E., Shapiro, H., Lucas, S. M., Grimwood, J., Schmutz, J., Cardol, P., Cerutti, H., Chanfreau, G., Chen, C., Cognat, V., Croft, M. T., Dent, R., Dutcher, S., Fernandez, E., Fukuzawa, H., Gonzalez-Ballester, D., Gonzalez-Halphen, D., Hallmann, A., Hanikenne, M., Hippler, M., Inwood, W., Jabbari, K., Kalanon, M., Kuras, R., Lefebvre, P. A., Lemaire, S. D., Lobanov, A. V., Lohr, M., Manuell, A., Meier, I., Mets, L., Mittag, M., Mittelmeier, T., Moroney, J. V., Moseley, J., Napoli, C., Nedelcu, A. M., Niyogi, K., Novoselov, S. V., Paulsen, I. T., Pazour, G., Purton, S., Ral, J., Riano-Pachon, D. M., Riekhof, W., Rymarquis, L., Schroda, M., Stern, D., Umen, J., Willows, R., Wilson, N., Zimmer, S. L., Allmer, J., Balk, J., Bisova, K., Chen, C., Elias, M., Gendler, K., Hauser, C., Lamb, M. R., Ledford, H., Long, J. C., Minagawa, J., Page, M. D., Pan, J., Pootakham, W., Roje, S., Rose, A., Stahlberg, E., Terauchi, A. M., Yang, P., Ball, S., Bowler, C., Dieckmann, C. L., Gladyshev, V. N., Green, P., Jorgensen, R., Mayfield, S., Mueller-Roeber, B., Rajamani, S., Sayre, R. T., Brokstein, P., Dubchak, I., Goodstein, D., Hornick, L., Huang, Y. W., Jhaveri, J., Luo, Y., Martinez, D., Ngau, W. C., Otillar, B., Poliakov, A., Porter, A., Szajkowski, L., Werner, G., Zhou, K., Grigoriev, I. V., Rokhsar, D. S., Grossman, A. R. 2007; 318 (5848): 245-251

    Abstract

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the approximately 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella.

    View details for DOI 10.1126/science.1143609

    View details for Web of Science ID 000250086100040

    View details for PubMedID 17932292

  • Primary CNS lymphomas prognosis - In reply JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY Abrey, L. E., Ben-Porat, L., Panageas, K. S., Yahalom, J., Curran, W., Schultz, C., Leibel, S., Nelson, D., Mehta, M., DeAngelis, L. M. 2007; 25 (27): 4324-4325
  • Techniques for predicting the lifetimes of wave-swept macroalgae: a primer on fracture mechanics and crack growth JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY Mach, K. J., Nelson, D. V., Denny, M. W. 2007; 210 (13): 2213-2230

    Abstract

    Biomechanical analyses of intertidal and shallow subtidal seaweeds have elucidated ways in which these organisms avoid breakage in the presence of exceptional hydrodynamic forces imposed by pounding surf. However, comparison of algal material properties to maximum hydrodynamic forces predicts lower rates of breakage and dislodgment than are actually observed. Why the disparity between prediction and reality? Most previous research has measured algal material properties during a single application of force, equivalent to a single wave rushing past an alga. In contrast, intertidal macroalgae may experience more than 8000 waves a day. This repeated loading can cause cracks - introduced, for example, by herbivory or abrasion - to grow and eventually cause breakage, yet fatigue crack growth has not previously been taken into account. Here, we present methods from the engineering field of fracture mechanics that can be used to assess consequences of repeated force imposition for seaweeds. These techniques allow quantification of crack growth in wave-swept macroalgae, a first step towards considering macroalgal breakage in the realistic context of repeated force imposition. These analyses can also be applied to many other soft materials.

    View details for DOI 10.1242/jeb.001560

    View details for Web of Science ID 000248304900009

    View details for PubMedID 17575028

  • Death by small forces: a fracture and fatigue analysis of wave-swept macroalgae JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY Mach, K. J., Hale, B. B., Denny, M. W., Nelson, D. V. 2007; 210 (13): 2231-2243

    Abstract

    Wave-swept macroalgae are subjected to large hydrodynamic forces as each wave breaks on shore, loads that are repeated thousands of times per day. Previous studies have shown that macroalgae can easily withstand isolated impositions of maximal field forces. Nonetheless, macroalgae break frequently. Here we investigate the possibility that repeated loading by sub-lethal forces can eventually cause fracture by fatigue. We determine fracture toughness, in the form of critical strain energy release rate, for several flat-bladed macroalgae, thereby assessing their resistance to complete fracture in the presence of cracks. Critical energy release rates are evaluated through single-edge-notch, pull-to-break tests and single-edge-notch, repeated-loading tests. Crack growth at sub-critical energy release rates is measured in repeated-loading tests, providing a first assessment of algal breakage under conditions of repeated loading. We then estimate the number of imposed waves required for un-notched algal blades to reach the point of complete fracture. We find that, if not checked by repair, fatigue crack growth from repeated sub-lethal stresses may completely fracture individuals within days. Our results suggest that fatigue may play an important role in macroalgal breakage.

    View details for DOI 10.1242/jeb.001578

    View details for Web of Science ID 000248304900010

    View details for PubMedID 17575029

  • Evolutionary and biomedical insights from the rhesus macaque genome SCIENCE Gibbs, R. A., Rogers, J., Katze, M. G., Bumgarner, R., Weinstock, G. M., Mardis, E. R., Remington, K. A., Strausberg, R. L., Venter, J. C., Wilson, R. K., Batzer, M. A., Bustamante, C. D., Eichler, E. E., Hahn, M. W., Hardison, R. C., Makova, K. D., Miller, W., Milosavljevic, A., Palermo, R. E., Siepel, A., Sikela, J. M., Attaway, T., Bell, S., Bernard, K. E., Buhay, C. J., Chandrabose, M. N., Dao, M., Davis, C., Delehaunty, K. D., Ding, Y., Dinh, H. H., Dugan-Rocha, S., Fulton, L. A., Gabisi, R. A., Garner, T. T., Godfrey, J., Hawes, A. C., Hernandez, J., Hines, S., Holder, M., Hume, J., Jhangiani, S. N., Joshi, V., Khan, Z. M., Kirkness, E. F., Cree, A., Fowler, R. G., Lee, S., Lewis, L. R., Li, Z., Liu, Y., Moore, S. M., Muzny, D., Nazareth, L. V., Ngo, D. N., Okwuonu, G. O., Pai, G., Parker, D., Paul, H. A., Pfannkoch, C., Pohl, C. S., Rogers, Y., Ruiz, S. J., Sabo, A., Santibanez, J., Schneider, B. W., Smith, S. M., Sodergren, E., Svatek, A. F., Utterback, T. R., Vattathil, S., Warren, W., White, C. S., Chinwalla, A. T., Feng, Y., Halpern, A. L., Hillier, L. W., Huang, X., Minx, P., Nelson, J. O., Pepin, K. H., Qin, X., Sutton, G. G., Venter, E., Walenz, B. P., Wallis, J. W., Worley, K. C., Yang, S., Jones, S. M., Marra, M. A., Rocchi, M., Schein, J. E., Baertsch, R., Clarke, L., Csuros, M., Glasscock, J., Harris, R. A., Haviak, P., Jackson, A. R., Jiang, H., Liu, Y., Messina, D. N., Shen, Y., Song, H. X., Wylie, T., Zhang, L., Birney, E., Han, K., Konkel, M. K., Lee, J., Smit, A. F., Ullmer, B., Wang, H., Xing, J., Burhans, R., Cheng, Z., Karro, J. E., Ma, J., Raney, B., She, X., Cox, M. J., Demuth, J. P., Dumas, L. J., Han, S., Hopkins, J., Karimpour-Fard, A., Kim, Y. H., Pollack, J. R., Vinar, T., Addo-Quaye, C., Degenhardt, J., Denby, A., Hubisz, M. J., Indap, A., Kosiol, C., Lahn, B. T., Lawson, H. A., Marklein, A., Nielsen, R., Vallender, E. J., Clark, A. G., Ferguson, B., Hernandez, R. D., Hirani, K., Kehrer-Sawatzki, H., Kolb, J., Patil, S., Pu, L., Ren, Y., Smith, D. G., Wheeler, D. A., Schenck, I., Ball, E. V., Chen, R., Cooper, D. N., Giardine, B., Hsu, F., Kent, W. J., Lesk, A., Nelson, D. L., O'Brien, W. E., Prufer, K., Stenson, P. D., Wallace, J. C., Ke, H., Liu, X., Wang, P., Xiang, A. P., Yang, F., Barber, G. P., Haussler, D., Karolchik, D., Kern, A. D., Kuhn, R. M., Smith, K. E., Zwieg, A. S. 2007; 316 (5822): 222-234

    Abstract

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is an abundant primate species that diverged from the ancestors of Homo sapiens about 25 million years ago. Because they are genetically and physiologically similar to humans, rhesus monkeys are the most widely used nonhuman primate in basic and applied biomedical research. We determined the genome sequence of an Indian-origin Macaca mulatta female and compared the data with chimpanzees and humans to reveal the structure of ancestral primate genomes and to identify evidence for positive selection and lineage-specific expansions and contractions of gene families. A comparison of sequences from individual animals was used to investigate their underlying genetic diversity. The complete description of the macaque genome blueprint enhances the utility of this animal model for biomedical research and improves our understanding of the basic biology of the species.

    View details for DOI 10.1126/science.1139247

    View details for Web of Science ID 000245654500037

    View details for PubMedID 17431167

  • Techniques for Predicting Lifetime: a Primer on Fracture Mechanics and Crack Growth in Wave-swept Macroalgae J Exp Biol Mach, K., Nelson, D., Denny, M. 2007; 210: 2213-2230
  • Primary central nervous system lymphoma: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center prognostic model JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY Abrey, L. E., Ben-Porat, L., Panageas, K. S., Yahalom, J., Berkey, B., Curran, W., Schultz, C., Leibel, S., Nelson, D., Mehta, M., DeAngelis, L. M. 2006; 24 (36): 5711-5715

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to analyze prognostic factors for patients with newly diagnosed primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) in order to establish a predictive model that could be applied to the care of patients and the design of prospective clinical trials.Three hundred thirty-eight consecutive patients with newly diagnosed PCNSL seen at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC; New York, NY) between 1983 and 2003 were analyzed. Standard univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. In addition, a formal cut point analysis was used to determine the most statistically significant cut point for age. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to create independent prognostic classes. An external validation set obtained from three prospective Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) PCNSL clinical trials was used to test the RPA classification.Age and performance status were the only variables identified on standard multivariate analysis. Cut point analysis of age determined that patients age < or = 50 years had significantly improved outcome compared with older patients. RPA of 282 patients identified three distinct prognostic classes: class 1 (patients < 50 years), class 2 (patients > or =50; Karnofsky performance score [KPS] > or = 70) and class 3 (patients > or = 50; KPS < 70). These three classes significantly distinguished outcome with regard to both overall and failure-free survival. Analysis of the RTOG data set confirmed the validity of this classification. CONCLUSION The MSKCC prognostic score is a simple, statistically powerful model with universal applicability to patients with newly diagnosed PCNSL. We recommend that it be adopted for the management of newly diagnosed patients and incorporated into the design of prospective clinical trials.

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JCO.2006.08.2941

    View details for Web of Science ID 000242994400015

    View details for PubMedID 17116938

  • Fabrication of the GLAST silicon tracker readout electronics IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE Baldini, L., Brez, A., Himel, T., Johnson, R. P., Latronico, L., Minuti, M., Nelson, D., Sadrozinski, H. W., Sgro', C., Spandre, G., Sugizaki, M., Tajima, H., Cohen-Tanugi, J., Young, C., Ziegler, M. 2006; 53 (5): 3013-3020
  • The genome of black cottonwood, Populus trichocarpa (Torr. & Gray) SCIENCE Tuskan, G. A., DiFazio, S., Jansson, S., Bohlmann, J., Grigoriev, I., Hellsten, U., Putnam, N., Ralph, S., Rombauts, S., Salamov, A., Schein, J., Sterck, L., Aerts, A., Bhalerao, R. R., Bhalerao, R. P., Blaudez, D., Boerjan, W., Brun, A., Brunner, A., Busov, V., Campbell, M., Carlson, J., Chalot, M., Chapman, J., Chen, G., Cooper, D., Coutinho, P. M., Couturier, J., Covert, S., Cronk, Q., Cunningham, R., Davis, J., Degroeve, S., Dejardin, A., dePamphilis, C., Detter, J., Dirks, B., Dubchak, I., Duplessis, S., Ehlting, J., Ellis, B., Gendler, K., Goodstein, D., Gribskov, M., Grimwood, J., Groover, A., Gunter, L., Hamberger, B., Heinze, B., Helariutta, Y., Henrissat, B., Holligan, D., Holt, R., Huang, W., Islam-Faridi, N., Jones, S., Jones-Rhoades, M., Jorgensen, R., Joshi, C., Kangasjarvi, J., Karlsson, J., Kelleher, C., Kirkpatrick, R., Kirst, M., Kohler, A., Kalluri, U., Larimer, F., Leebens-Mack, J., Leple, J., Locascio, P., Lou, Y., Lucas, S., Martin, F., Montanini, B., Napoli, C., Nelson, D. R., Nelson, C., Nieminen, K., Nilsson, O., Pereda, V., Peter, G., Philippe, R., Pilate, G., Poliakov, A., Razumovskaya, J., Richardson, P., Rinaldi, C., Ritland, K., Rouze, P., Ryaboy, D., Schmutz, J., Schrader, J., Segerman, B., Shin, H., Siddiqui, A., Sterky, F., Terry, A., Tsai, C., Uberbacher, E., Unneberg, P., Vahala, J., Wall, K., Wessler, S., Yang, G., Yin, T., Douglas, C., Marra, M., Sandberg, G., Van de Peer, Y., Rokhsar, D. 2006; 313 (5793): 1596-1604

    Abstract

    We report the draft genome of the black cottonwood tree, Populus trichocarpa. Integration of shotgun sequence assembly with genetic mapping enabled chromosome-scale reconstruction of the genome. More than 45,000 putative protein-coding genes were identified. Analysis of the assembled genome revealed a whole-genome duplication event; about 8000 pairs of duplicated genes from that event survived in the Populus genome. A second, older duplication event is indistinguishably coincident with the divergence of the Populus and Arabidopsis lineages. Nucleotide substitution, tandem gene duplication, and gross chromosomal rearrangement appear to proceed substantially more slowly in Populus than in Arabidopsis. Populus has more protein-coding genes than Arabidopsis, ranging on average from 1.4 to 1.6 putative Populus homologs for each Arabidopsis gene. However, the relative frequency of protein domains in the two genomes is similar. Overrepresented exceptions in Populus include genes associated with lignocellulosic wall biosynthesis, meristem development, disease resistance, and metabolite transport.

    View details for DOI 10.1126/science.1128691

    View details for Web of Science ID 000240498900035

    View details for PubMedID 16973872

  • The silicon tracker readout electronics of the gamma-ray large area space telescope IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE Baldini, L., Brez, A., Himel, T., Hirayama, M., Johnson, R. P., Kroeger, W., Latronico, L., Minuti, M., Nelson, D., Rando, R., Sadrozinski, H. F., Sgro, C., Spandre, G., Spencer, E. N., Sugizaki, M., Tajima, H., Cohen-Tanugi, J., Ziegler, M. 2006; 53 (2): 466-473
  • Residual stress determination using hole drilling and 3D image correlation EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICS Nelson, D. V., Makino, A., Schmidt, T. 2006; 46 (1): 31-38
  • Residual Stress Determination Using Digital Image Correlation Exp Mech Nelson, D., Makino, A., Schmidt, T. 2006; 1 (46): 31-38
  • Galectin-1: A link between tumor hypoxia and tumor immune privilege JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY Le, Q. T., Shi, G. Y., Cao, H. B., Nelson, D. W., Wang, Y. Y., CHEN, E. Y., Zhao, S. C., Kong, C., Richardson, D., O'Byrne, K. J., Giaccia, A. J., Koong, A. C. 2005; 23 (35): 8932-8941

    Abstract

    To identify a 15-KDa novel hypoxia-induced secreted protein in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and to determine its role in malignant progression.We used surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) and tandem MS to identify a novel hypoxia-induced secreted protein in FaDu cells. We used immunoblots, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay to confirm the hypoxic induction of this secreted protein as galectin-1 in cell lines and xenografts. We stained tumor tissues from 101 HNSCC patients for galectin-1, CA IX (carbonic anhydrase IX, a hypoxia marker) and CD3 (a T-cell marker). Expression of these markers was correlated to each other and to treatment outcomes.SELDI-TOF studies yielded a hypoxia-induced peak at 15 kDa that proved to be galectin-1 by MS analysis. Immunoblots and PCR studies confirmed increased galectin-1 expression by hypoxia in several cancer cell lines. Plasma levels of galectin-1 were higher in tumor-bearing severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice breathing 10% O2 compared with mice breathing room air. In HNSCC patients, there was a significant correlation between galectin-1 and CA IX staining (P = .01) and a strong inverse correlation between galectin-1 and CD3 staining (P = .01). Expression of galectin-1 and CD3 were significant predictors for overall survival on multivariate analysis.Galectin-1 is a novel hypoxia-regulated protein and a prognostic marker in HNSCC. This study presents a new mechanism on how hypoxia can affect the malignant progression and therapeutic response of solid tumors by regulating the secretion of proteins that modulate immune privilege.

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JCO.2005.02.0206

    View details for Web of Science ID 000234026500004

    View details for PubMedID 16219933

  • A noninvasive approach for assessing tumor hypoxia in xenografts: Developing a urinary marker for hypoxia CANCER RESEARCH Nelson, D. W., Cao, H. B., Zhu, Y. H., Sunar-Reeder, B., Choi, C. Y., Faix, J. D., Brown, J. M., Koong, A. C., Giaccia, A. J., Le, Q. T. 2005; 65 (14): 6151-6158

    Abstract

    Tumor hypoxia modifies the efficacy of conventional anticancer therapy and promotes malignant tumor progression. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein secreted during pregnancy that has been used to monitor tumor burden in xenografts engineered to express this marker. We adapted this approach to use urinary beta-hCG as a secreted reporter protein for tumor hypoxia. We used a hypoxia-inducible promoter containing five tandem repeats of the hypoxia-response element (HRE) ligated upstream of the beta-hCG gene. This construct was stably integrated into two different cancer cell lines, FaDu, a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and RKO, a human colorectal cancer cell line. In vitro studies showed that tumor cells stably transfected with this plasmid construct secrete beta-hCG in response to hypoxia or hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) stabilizing agents. The hypoxia responsiveness of this construct can be blocked by treatment with agents that affect the HIF-1alpha pathways, including topotecan, 1-benzyl-3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)indazole (YC-1), and flavopiridol. Immunofluorescent analysis of tumor sections and quantitative assessment with flow cytometry indicate colocalization between beta-hCG and 2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl)acetamide (EF5) and beta-hCG and pimonidazole, two extrinsic markers for tumor hypoxia. Secretion of beta-hCG from xenografts that contain these stable constructs is directly responsive to changes in tumor oxygenation, including exposure of the animals to 10% O2 and tumor bed irradiation. Similarly, urinary beta-hCG levels decline after treatment with flavopiridol, an inhibitor of HIF-1 transactivation. This effect was observed only in tumor cells expressing a HRE-regulated reporter gene and not in tumor cells expressing a cytomegalovirus-regulated reporter gene. The 5HRE beta-hCG reporter system described here enables serial, noninvasive monitoring of tumor hypoxia in a mouse model by measuring a urinary reporter protein.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000230633400024

    View details for PubMedID 16024616

  • XBP1 is essential for survival under hypoxic conditions and is required for tumor growth CANCER RESEARCH Romero-Ramirez, L., Cao, H. B., Nelson, D., Hammond, E., Lee, A. H., Yoshida, H., Mori, K., Glimcher, L. H., Denko, N. C., Giaccia, A. J., Le, Q. T., Koong, A. C. 2004; 64 (17): 5943-5947

    Abstract

    Hypoxia within solid tumors is a major determinant of outcome after anticancer therapy. Analysis of gene expression changes during hypoxia indicated that unfolded protein response genes were one of the most robustly induced groups of genes. In this study, we investigated the hypoxic regulation of X-box binding protein (XBP1), a major transcriptional regulator of the unfolded protein response. Hypoxia induced XBP1 at the transcriptional level and activated splicing of its mRNA, resulting in increased levels of activated XBP1 protein. After exposure to hypoxia, apoptosis increased and clonogenic survival decreased in XBP1-deficient cells. Loss of XBP1 severely inhibited tumor growth due to a reduced capacity for these transplanted tumor cells to survive in a hypoxic microenvironment. Taken together, these studies directly implicate XBP1 as an essential survival factor for hypoxic stress and tumor growth.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000223603200007

    View details for PubMedID 15342372

  • Keratin 8 and 18 hyperphosphorylation is a marker of progression of human liver disease HEPATOLOGY Toivola, D. A., Ku, N. O., Resurreccion, E. Z., Nelson, D. R., Wright, T. L., Omary, M. B. 2004; 40 (2): 459-466

    Abstract

    Keratin 8 and 18 (K8/18) phosphorylation plays a significant and site-specific role in regulating keratin filament organization, association with binding proteins, and modulation of cell cycle progression. Keratin hyperphosphorylation correlates with exposure to a variety of stresses in cultured cells and in mouse models of liver, pancreatic, and gallbladder injury, and it is found in association with mouse and human Mallory bodies. We asked whether K8/18 phosphorylation correlates with human liver disease progression by analyzing liver explants and biopsies of patients with chronic noncirrhotic hepatitis C virus (HCV) or cirrhosis. We also examined the effect of HCV therapy with interleukin-10 on keratin phosphorylation. Using site-specific antiphosphokeratin antibodies we found keratin hyperphosphorylation on most K8/18 sites in all cirrhotic liver explants tested and in most liver biopsies from patients with chronic HCV infection. Immunofluorescence staining of precirrhotic HCV livers showed focal keratin hyperphosphorylation and limited reorganization of keratin filament networks. In cirrhotic livers, keratin hyperphosphorylation occurred preferentially in hepatic nodule cells adjacent to bridging fibrosis and associated with increased stress kinase activation and apoptosis. Histological and serological improvement after interleukin-10 therapy was accompanied by normalization of keratin hyperphosphorylation on some sites in 7 of 10 patients. In conclusion, site-specific keratin phosphorylation in liver disease is a progression marker when increased and a likely regression marker when decreased.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/hep.20277

    View details for Web of Science ID 000223439400022

    View details for PubMedID 15368451

  • Detection of southward intracontinental subduction of Tibetan lithosphere along the Bangong-Nujiang suture by P-to-S converted waves GEOLOGY Shi, D., Zhao, W. J., Brown, L., Nelson, D., Zhao, X., Kind, R., Ni, J., Xiong, J. Y., Mechie, J., Guo, J., Klemperer, S., Hearn, T. 2004; 32 (3): 209-212

    View details for DOI 10.1130/G19814.1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000189284200009

  • A study of small crack growth in aluminum alloy 7075-T6 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FATIGUE Donnelly, E., Nelson, D. 2002; 24 (11): 1175-1189
  • The BABAR detector NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Aubert, B., Bazan, A., Boucham, A., Boutigny, D., De Bonis, I., Favier, J., Gaillard, J. M., Jeremie, A., Karyotakis, Y., Le Flour, T., Lees, J. P., Lieunard, S., Petitpas, P., Robbe, P., Tisserand, V., Zachariadou, K., Palano, A., Chen, G. P., Chen, J. C., Qi, N. D., Rong, G., Wang, P., Zhu, Y. S., Eigen, G., Reinertsen, P. L., Stugu, B., Abbott, B., Abrams, G. S., Amerman, L., Borgland, A. W., Breon, A. B., Brown, D. N., Button-Shafer, J., Clark, A. R., Dardin, S., Day, C., Dow, S. F., Fan, Q., Gaponenko, I., Gill, M. S., Goozen, F. R., Gowdy, S. J., Gritsan, A., Groysman, Y., Hernikl, C., Jacobsen, R. G., Jared, R. C., Kadel, R. W., Kadyk, J., Karcher, A., Kerth, L. T., Kipnis, I., Kluth, S., Kral, J. F., Lafever, R., Leclerc, C., Levi, M. E., Lewis, S. A., Lionberger, C., Liu, T., Long, M., Luo, L., Lynch, G., Luft, P., Mandelli, E., Marino, M., Marks, K., Matuk, C., Meyer, A. B., Minor, R., MOKHTARANI, A., Momayezi, M., Nyman, M., Oddone, P. J., Ohnemus, J., Oshatz, D., Patton, S., Pedrali-Noy, M., Perazzo, A., Peters, C., Pope, W., Pripstein, M., Quarrie, D. R., Rasson, J. E., Roe, N. A., Romosan, A., Ronan, M. T., Shelkov, V. G., Stone, R., Strother, P. D., Telnov, A. V., von der Lippe, H., Weber, T. F., Wenzel, W. A., Zizka, G., Bright-Thomas, P. G., Hawkes, C. M., Kirk, A., Knowles, D. J., O'Neale, S. W., Watson, A. T., Watson, N. K., Deppermann, T., Koch, H., Krug, J., Kunze, M., Lewandowski, B., Peters, K., Schmuecker, H., Steinke, M., Andress, J. C., Barlow, N. R., Bhimji, W., Chevalier, N., Clark, P. J., Cottingham, W. N., De Groot, N., Dyce, N., Foster, B., Mass, A., McFall, J. D., Wallom, D., Wilson, F. F., Abe, K., Hearty, C., McKenna, J. A., Thiessen, D., Camanzi, B., Harrison, T. J., McKemey, A. K., Tinslay, J., Antohin, E. I., Blinov, V. E., Bukin, A. D., Bukin, D. A., Buzykaev, A. R., Dubrovin, M. S., Golubev, V. B., Ivanchenko, V. N., Kolachev, G. M., Korol, A. A., Kravchenko, E. A., Mikhailov, S. F., Onuchin, A. P., Salnikov, A. A., Serednyakov, S. I., Skovpen, Y. I., Telnov, V. I., Yushkov, A. N., Booth, J., Lankford, A. J., Mandelkern, M., Pier, S., Stoker, D. P., Zioulas, G., Ahsan, A., Arisaka, K., Buchanan, C., Chun, S., Faccini, R., MacFarlane, D. B., Prell, S. A., Rahatlou, S., Raven, G., Sharma, V., Burke, S., Callahan, D., Campagnari, C., Dahmes, B., Hale, D., Hart, P. A., Kuznetsova, N., Kyre, S., Levy, S. L., Long, O., Lu, A., May, J., Richman, J. D., Verkerke, W., Witherell, M., Yellin, S., Beringer, J., DeWitt, J., Dorfan, D. E., Eisner, A. M., Frey, A., Grillo, A. A., Grothe, M., Heusch, C. A., Johnson, R. P., Kroeger, W., Lockman, W. S., Pulliam, T., Rowe, W., Sadrozinski, H., Schalk, T., Schmitz, R. E., Schumm, B. A., Seiden, A., Spencer, E. N., Turri, M., Walkowiak, W., Wilder, M., Williams, D. C., Chen, E., Dubois-Felsmann, G. P., Dvoretskii, A., Hanson, J. E., Hitlin, D. G., Kolomensky, Y. G., Metzler, S., Oyang, J., Porter, F. C., Ryd, A., Samuel, A., Weaver, M., Yang, S., Zhu, R. Y., Devmal, S., Geld, T. L., Jayatilleke, S., Jayatilleke, S. M., Mancinelli, G., Meadows, B. T., Sokoloff, M. D., Bloom, P., Broomer, B., Erdos, E., Fahey, S., Ford, W. T., Gaede, F., van Hoek, W. C., Johnson, D. R., Michael, A. K., Nauenberg, U., Olivas, A., Park, H., Rankin, P., Roy, J., Sen, S., Smith, J. G., Wagner, D. L., Blouw, J., Harton, J. L., Krishnamurthy, M., Soffer, A., Toki, W. H., Warner, D. W., Wilson, R. J., Zhang, J., Brandt, T., Brose, J., Dahlinger, G., Dickopp, M., Dubitzky, R. S., Eckstein, P., Futterschneider, H., Kocian, M. L., Krause, R., Muller-Pfefferkorn, R., Schubert, K. R., Schwierz, R., Spaan, B., Wilden, L., Behr, L., Bernard, D., Bonneaud, G. R., Brochard, F., Cohen-Tanugi, J., Ferrag, S., Fouque, G., Gastaldi, F., Matricon, P., de Freitas, P. M., Renard, C., Roussot, E., T'Jampens, S., Thiebaux, C., Vasileiadis, G., Verderi, M., Anjomshoaa, A., Bernet, R., Di Lodovico, F., Muheim, F., Playfer, S., Swain, J. E., Falbo, M., Bozzi, C., Dittongo, S., Folegani, M., Piemontese, L., Ramusino, A. C., Treadwell, E., Anulli, F., Baldini-Ferroli, R., Calcaterra, A., de Sangro, R., Falciai, D., Finocchiaro, G., Patteri, P., Peruzzi, I. M., Piccolo, M., Xie, Y., Zallo, A., Bagnasco, S., Buzzo, A., Contri, R., Crosetti, G., Fabbricatore, P., Farinon, S., Lo Vetere, M., Macri, M., Minutoli, S., Monge, M. R., Musenich, R., Pallavicini, M., Parodi, R., Passaggio, S., Pastore, F. C., Patrignani, C., Pia, M. G., Priano, C., Robutti, E., Santroni, A., Bartoldus, R., Dignan, T., HAMILTON, R., Mallik, U., Cochran, J., Crawley, H. B., Fischer, P. A., Lamsa, J., McKay, R., Meyer, W. T., Rosenberg, E. I., Albert, J. N., Beigbeder, C., Benkebil, M., Breton, D., Cizeron, R., Du, S., Grosdidier, G., Hast, C., Hocker, A., Lacker, H. M., Lepeltier, V., Lutz, A. M., Plaszczynski, S., Schune, M. H., Trincaz-Duvoid, S., Truong, K., Valassi, A., Wormser, G., Alford, O., Behne, D., Bionta, R. M., Bowman, J., Brigljevic, V., Brooks, A., Dacosta, V. A., Fackler, O., Fujino, D., Harper, M., Lange, D. J., Mugge, M., O'Connor, T. G., Olson, H., Ott, L., Parker, E., Pedrotti, B., Roeben, M., Shi, X., van Bibber, K., Wenaus, T. J., Wright, D. M., Wuest, C. R., Yamamoto, B., Carroll, M., Cooke, P., Fry, J. R., Gabathuler, E., Gamet, R., George, M., Kay, M., McMahon, S., Muir, A., Payne, D. J., Sloane, R. J., Sutcliffe, P., Touramanis, C., Aspinwall, M. L., Bowerman, D. A., Dauncey, P. D., Eschrich, I., Gunawardane, N. J., Martin, R., Nash, J. A., Price, D. R., Sanders, P., Smith, D., Azzopardi, D. E., Back, J. J., Dixon, P., Harrison, P. F., Newman-Coburn, D., Potter, R. J., Shorthouse, H. W., Williams, M. I., Vidal, P. B., Cowan, G., George, S., Green, M. G., Kurup, A., Marker, C. E., McGrath, P., McMahon, T. R., Salvatore, F., Scott, I., Vaitsas, G., Brown, D., Davis, C. L., Li, Y., Pavlovich, J., Allison, J., Barlow, R. J., Boyd, J. T., Fullwood, J., Jackson, F., Khan, A., Lafferty, G. D., Savvas, N., Simopoulos, E. T., Thompson, R. J., Weatherall, J. H., Bard, R., Dallapiccola, C., Farbin, A., Jawahery, A., Lillard, V., Olsen, J., Roberts, D. A., Schieck, J. R., Blaylock, G., Flood, K. T., Hertzbach, S. S., Kofler, R., Lin, C. S., Willocq, S., Wittlin, J., Brau, B., Cowan, R., Taylor, F., Yamamoto, R. K., Britton, D. I., Fernholz, R., Houde, M., Milek, M., Patel, P. M., Trischuk, J., Lanni, F., Palombo, F., Bauer, J. M., Booke, M., Cremaldi, L., Kroeger, R., Reep, M., Reidy, J., Sanders, D. A., Summers, D. J., Arguin, J. F., Beaulieu, M., Martin, J. P., Nief, J. Y., Seitz, R., Taras, P., Woch, A., Zacek, V., Nicholson, H., Sutton, C. S., Cartaro, C., Cavallo, N., De Nardo, G., Fabozzi, F., Gatto, C., Lista, L., Piccolo, D., Sciacca, C., Cason, N. M., LoSecco, J. M., Alsmiller, J. R., Gabriel, T. A., Handler, T., Heck, J., Iwasaki, M., Sinev, N. B., Caracciolo, R., Colecchia, F., Dal Corso, F., Galeazzi, F., Marzolla, M., Michelon, G., Morandin, M., Posocco, M., Rotondo, M., SANTI, S., Simonetto, F., Stroili, R., Torassa, E., Voci, C., Bailly, P., Benayoun, M., Briand, H., Chauveau, J., David, P., de la Vaissiere, C., Del Buono, L., Genat, J. F., Hamon, O., Leruste, P., Le Diberder, F., Lebbolo, H., Lory, J., Martin, L., Martinez-Vidal, F., Roos, L., Stark, J., Versille, S., Zhang, B., Manfredi, P. F., Ratti, L., Re, V., Speziali, V., Frank, E. D., Gladney, L., Guo, Q. H., Panetta, J. H., Angelini, C., Batignani, G., Bettarini, S., Bondioli, M., Bosi, F., Carpinelli, M., Forti, F., Gaddi, A., Gagliardi, D., Giorgi, M. A., Lusiani, A., Mammini, P., Morganti, M., Morsani, F., Neri, N., Profeti, A., Paoloni, E., Raffaelli, F., Rama, M., Rizzo, G., Sandrelli, F., Simi, G., Triggiani, G., Haire, M., Judd, D., Paick, K., Turnbull, L., Wagoner, D. E., Albert, J., Bula, C., Kelsey, M. H., Lu, C., McDonald, K. T., Miftakov, V., Sands, B., Schaffner, S. F., Smith, A. J., Tumanov, A., Varnes, E. W., Bronzini, F., Buccheri, A., Bulfon, C., Cavoto, G., del Re, D., Ferrarotto, F., Ferroni, F., Fratini, K., Lamanna, E., Leonardi, E., Mazzoni, M. A., Morganti, S., Piredda, G., Tehrani, F. S., Serra, M., Voena, C., Waldi, R., Jacques, P. F., Kalelkar, M., Plano, R. J., Adye, T., Claxton, B., Dowdell, J., Egede, U., Franek, B., Galagedera, S., Geddes, N. I., Gopal, G. P., Kay, J., Lidbury, J., Madani, S., Metcalfe, S., Metcalfe, S., Markey, G., Olley, P., Watt, M., Xella, S. M., Aleksan, R., Besson, P., Bourgeois, P., CONVERT, P., De Domenico, G., de Lesquen, A., Emery, S., Gaidot, A., Ganzhur, S. F., Georgette, Z., Gosset, L., Graffin, P., de Monchenault, G. H., Herve, S., Karolak, M., Kozanecki, W., Langer, M., London, G. W., Marques, V., Mayer, B., Micout, P., Mols, J. P., Mouly, J. P., Penichot, Y., Rolquin, J., Serfass, B., Toussaint, J. C., Usseglio, M., Vasseur, G., Yeche, C., Zito, M., Copty, N., Purohit, M. V., Yumiceva, F. X., Adam, I., Adesanya, A., Anthony, P. L., Aston, D., Bartelt, J., Becla, J., Bell, R., BLOOM, E., Boeheim, C. T., Boyarski, A. M., Boyce, R. F., Briggs, D., Bulos, F., Burgess, W., Byers, B., Calderini, G., Chestnut, R., Claus, R., Convery, M. R., Coombes, R., Cottrell, L., Coupal, D. P., Coward, D. H., Craddock, W. W., DeBarger, S., DeStaebler, H., Dorfan, J., Doser, M., Dunwoodie, W., Dusatko, J. E., Ecklund, S., Fieguth, T. H., Freytag, D. R., Glanzman, T., Godfrey, G. L., Haller, G., Hanushevsky, A., Harris, J., Hasan, A., Hee, C., Himel, T., Huffer, M. E., Hung, T., Innes, W. R., Jessop, C. P., Kawahara, H., Keller, L., King, M. E., Klaisner, L., Krebs, H. J., Langenegger, U., Langeveld, W., Leith, D. W., Louie, S. K., Luitz, S., Luth, V., Lynch, H. L., McDonald, J., Manzin, G., Marsiske, H., Mattison, T., McCulloch, M., McDougald, M., McShurley, D., Menke, S., Messner, R., Metcalfe, S., Morii, M., Mount, R., Muller, D. R., Nelson, D., Nordby, M., O'Grady, C. P., Olavson, L., Olsen, J., O'Neill, F. G., Oxoby, G., Paolucci, P., Pavel, T., Perl, J., Pertsova, M., Petrak, S., Putallaz, G., Raines, P. E., Ratcliff, B. N., Reif, R., Robertson, S. H., Rochester, L. S., Roodman, A., Russel, J. J., Sapozhnikov, L., Saxton, O. H., Schietinger, T., Schindler, R. H., Schwiening, J., Sciolla, G., Seeman, J. T., Serbo, V. V., Shapiro, S., Skarpass, K., Snyder, A., Soderstrom, E., Soha, A., Spanier, S. M., Stahl, A., Stiles, P., Su, D., Sullivan, M. K., Talby, M., Tanaka, H. A., Va'vra, J., Wagner, S. R., Wang, R., Weber, T., Weinstein, A. J., WHITE, J. L., Wienands, U., Wisniewski, W. J., Young, C. C., Yu, N., Burchat, P. R., Cheng, C. H., Kirkby, D., Meyer, T. I., Roat, C., Henderson, R., Khan, N., Berridge, S., Bugg, W., Cohn, H., Hart, E., Weidemann, A. W., Benninger, T., Izen, J. M., Kitayama, I., Lou, X. C., Turcotte, M., Bianchi, F., Bona, M., Daudo, F., Di Girolamo, B., Gamba, D., Grosso, P., Smol, A., Trapani, P. P., Zanin, D., Bosisio, L., Della Ricca, G., Lanceri, L., Pompili, A., Poropat, P., Prest, M., Rashevskaia, I., Vallazza, E., Vuagnin, G., Panvini, R. S., Brown, C., de Silva, A., Kowalewski, R., Pitman, D., Roney, J. M., Band, H. R., Charles, E., Dasu, S., Elmer, P., Johnson, J. R., Nielsen, J., Orejudos, W., Pan, Y., Prepost, R., Scott, I. J., Walsh, J., Wu, S. L., Yu, Z., Zobernig, H., Moore, T. B., Neal, H. 2002; 479 (1): 1-116
  • Qualitative and quantitative differences in cuticular hydrocarbons between laboratory and field colonies of Pogonomyrmex barbatus COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY B-BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Tissot, M., Nelson, D. R., GORDON, D. M. 2001; 130 (3): 349-358

    Abstract

    Ants held in the laboratory and field ants of the species Pogonomyrmex barbatus have quantitative differences in their cuticular hydrocarbons and a qualitative difference in their methyl-branched hydrocarbons. Laboratory-held workers showed twice the hydrocarbon content as field ants. This difference was mainly due to higher amounts of straight-chain alkanes and methyl-branched alkanes in laboratory ants, whereas the proportion of the alkenes remained the same for both groups. In addition to the absence of some hydrocarbons in the field colonies, one of the methyl-branched hydrocarbons differed in amount and branching pattern between the two groups of ants. Whereas, notable peaks of 2-methylalkanes were identified in ants kept in the laboratory, these compounds could not be identified in ants living in their natural habitat. However, a trace amount of 4-methyltriacontane was found in lieu of the 2-methyltriacontane counterpart in field ants. Possible explanations for both qualitative and quantitative differences are discussed.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000171356000008

    View details for PubMedID 11567897

  • Measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in B-0 decays to CP eigenstates PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS Aubert, B., Boutigny, D., De Bonis, I., Gaillard, J. M., Jeremie, K., Karyotakis, Y., Lees, J. P., Robbe, P., Tisserand, V., Palano, A., Chen, G. P., Chen, J. C., Qi, N. D., Rong, G., Wang, P., Zhu, Y. S., Eigen, G., Reinertsen, P. L., Stugu, B., Abbott, B., Abrams, G. S., Borgland, A. W., Breon, A. B., Brown, D. N., Button-Shafer, J., Cahn, R. N., Clark, A. R., Dardin, S., Day, C., Dow, S. F., Elioff, T., Fan, Q., Gaponenko, I., Gill, M. S., Goozen, F. R., Gowdy, S. J., Gritsan, A., Groysman, Y., Jacobsen, R. G., Jared, R. C., Kadel, R. W., Kadyk, J., Karcher, A., Kerth, L. T., Kipnis, I., Kluth, S., Kolomensky, Y. G., Kral, J. E., Lafever, R., Leclerc, C., Levi, M. E., Lewis, S. A., Lionberger, C., Liu, T., Long, M., Lynch, G., Marino, M., Marks, K., Meyer, A. B., MOKHTARANI, A., Momayezi, M., Nyman, M., Oddone, P. J., Ohnemus, J., Oshatz, D., Patton, S., Perazzo, A., Peters, C., Pope, W., Pripstein, M., Quarrie, D. R., Rasson, J. E., Roe, N. A., Romosan, A., Ronan, M. T., Shelkov, V. G., Stone, R., Telnov, A. V., von der Lippe, H., Weber, T., Wenzel, W. A., Zisman, M. S., Bright-Thomas, P. G., Harrison, T. J., Hawkes, C. M., Kirk, A., Knowles, D. J., O'Neale, S. W., Watson, A. T., Watson, N. K., Deppermann, T., Koch, H., Krug, J., Kunze, M., Lewandowski, B., Peters, K., Schmuecker, H., Steinke, M., Andress, J. C., Barlow, N. R., Bhimji, W., Chevalier, N., Clark, P. J., Cottingham, W. N., De Groot, N., Dyce, N., Foster, B., Mass, A., McFall, J. D., Wallom, D., Wilson, F. F., Abe, K., Hearty, C., Mattison, T. S., McKenna, J. A., Thiessen, D., Camanzi, B., Jolly, S., McKemey, A. K., Tinslay, J., Blinov, V. E., Bukin, A. D., Bukin, D. A., Buzykaev, A. R., Dubrovin, M. S., Golubev, V. B., Ivanchenko, V. N., Kolachev, G. M., Korol, A. A., Kravchenko, E. A., Onuchin, A. P., Salnikov, A. A., Serednyakov, S. I., Skovpen, Y. I., Telnov, V. I., Yushkov, A. N., Lankford, A. J., Mandelkern, M., McMahon, S., Stoker, D. P., Ahsan, A., Buchanan, C., Chun, S., MacFarlane, D. B., Prell, S., Rahatlou, S., Raven, G., Sharma, V., Burke, S., Campagnari, C., Dahmes, B., Hale, D., Hart, P. A., Kuznetsova, N., Kyre, S., Levy, S. L., Long, O., Lu, A., Richman, J. D., Verkerke, W., Witherell, M., Yellins, S., Beringer, J., Dorfan, D. E., Eisner, A. M., Frey, A., Grillo, A. A., Grothe, M., Heusch, C. A., Johnson, R. P., Kroeger, W., Lockman, W. S., Puiliam, T., Sadrozinski, H., Schalk, T., Schmitz, R. E., Schumm, B. A., Seiden, A., Spencer, E. N., Turri, M., Walkowiak, W., Williams, D. C., Chen, E., Dubois-Felsmann, G. P., Dvoretskii, A., Hanson, J. E., Hitlin, D. G., Metzler, S., Oyang, J., Porter, F. C., Ryd, A., Samuel, A., Weaver, M., Yang, S., Zhu, R. Y., Devmal, S., Geld, T. L., Jayatilleke, S., Jayatilleke, S. M., Mancinelli, G., Meadows, B. T., Sokoloff, M. D., Bloom, P., Fahey, S., Ford, W. T., Gaede, F., van Hoek, W. C., Johnson, D. R., Michael, A. K., Nauenberg, U., Olivas, A., Park, H., Rankin, P., Roy, J., Sen, S., Smith, J. G., Wagner, D. L., Blouw, J., Harton, J. L., Krishnamurthy, M., Soffer, A., Toki, W. H., Warner, D. W., Wilson, R. J., Zhang, J., Brandt, T., Brose, J., Colberg, T., Dahlinger, G., Dickopp, M., Dubitzky, R. S., Eckstein, P., Futterschneider, H., Krause, R., Maly, E., Muller-Pfefferkorn, R., Otto, S., Schubert, K. R., Schwierz, R., Spaan, B., Wilden, L., Behr, L., Bernard, D., Bonneaud, G. R., Brochard, F., Cohen-Tanugi, J., Ferrag, S., Fouque, G., Gastaldi, F., Matricon, P., de Freitas, P. M., Renard, C., Roussot, E., Jampens, S. T., Thiebaux, C., Vasileiadis, G., Verderi, M., Anjomshoaa, A., Bernet, R., Di Lodovico, F., Khan, A., Muheim, F., Playfer, S., Swain, J. E., Falbo, M., Bozzi, C., Dittongo, S., Folegani, M., Piemontese, L., Treadwell, E., Anulli, F., Baldini-Ferroli, R., Calcaterra, A., de Sangro, R., Falciai, D., Finocchiaro, G., Patteri, P., Peruzzi, I. M., Piccolo, M., Xie, Y., Zallo, A., Bagnasco, S., Buzzo, A., Contri, R., Crosetti, G., Lo Vetere, M., Macri, M., Monge, M. R., Pallavicini, M., Passaggio, S., Pastore, F. C., Patrignani, C., Pia, M. G., Robutti, E., Santroni, A., Morii, M., Bartoldus, R., Dignan, T., HAMILTON, R., Mallik, U., Cochran, J., Crawley, H. B., Fischer, P. A., Lamsa, J., McKay, R., Meyer, W. T., Rosenberg, E. I., Albert, J. N., Beigbeder, C., Benkebil, M., Breton, D., Cizeron, R., Du, S., Grosdidier, G., Hast, C., Hocker, A., Lepeltier, V., Lutz, A. M., Plaszczynski, S., Schune, M. H., Trincaz-Duvoid, S., Truong, K., Valassi, A., Wormser, G., Bionta, R. M., Brigijevic, V., Brooks, A., Fackler, O., Fujino, D., Lange, D. J., Mugge, M., O'Connor, T. G., Pedrotti, B., Shi, X., van Bibber, K., Wenaus, T. J., Wright, D. M., Wuest, C. R., Yamamoto, B., Carroll, M., Fry, J. R., Gabathuler, E., Gamet, R., George, M., Kay, M., Payne, D. J., Sloane, R. J., Touramanis, C., Aspinwall, M. L., Bowerman, D. A., Dauncey, P. D., Egede, U., Eschrich, I., Gunawardane, N. J., Martin, R., Nash, J. A., Price, D. R., Sanders, P., Smith, D., Azzopardi, D. E., Back, J. J., Dixon, P., Harrison, P. F., Newman-Coburn, D., Potter, R. J., Shorthouse, H. W., Strother, P., Vidal, P. B., Williams, M. I., Cowan, G., George, S., Green, M. G., Kurup, A., Marker, C. E., McGrath, P., McMahon, T. R., Salvatore, F., Scott, I., Vaitsas, G., Brown, D., Davis, C. L., Ford, K., Li, Y., Pavlovich, J., Allison, J., Barlow, R. J., Boyd, J. T., Fullwood, J., Jackson, F., Laffery, G. D., Savvas, N., Simopoulos, E. T., Thompson, R. J., Weatherall, J. H., Bard, R., Farbin, A., Jawahery, A., Lillard, V., Olsen, J., Roberts, D. A., Schieck, J. R., Blaylock, G., Dallapiccola, C., Flood, K. T., Hertzbach, S. S., Kofler, R., Lin, C. S., Staengle, H., Willocq, S., Wittlin, J., Brau, B., Cowan, R., Sciolla, G., Taylor, F., Yamamoto, R. K., Britton, D. I., Milek, M., Patel, P. M., Trischuk, J., Lanni, F., Palombo, F., Bauer, J. M., Booke, M., Cremaldi, L., Eschenberg, V., Kroeger, R., Reep, M., Reidy, J., Sanders, D. A., Summers, D. J., Beaulieu, M., Martin, J. P., Nief, J. Y., Seitz, R., Taras, P., Zacek, V., Nicholson, H., Sutton, C. S., Cavallo, N., Cartaro, C., De Nardo, G., Fabozzi, F., Gatto, C., Lista, L., Paolucci, P., Piccolo, D., Sciacca, C., LoSecco, J. M., Alsmiller, J. R., Gabriel, T. A., Handler, T., Heck, J., Brau, J. E., Frey, P., Iwasaki, M., Sinev, N. B., Strom, D., Borsato, E., Colecchia, F., Dal Corso, F., Galeazzi, F., Maroni, M., Marzolla, M., Michelon, G., Morandin, M., Posocco, M., Rotondo, M., Simonetto, F., Stroili, R., Torassa, E., Voci, C., Bailly, P., Benayoun, M., Briand, H., Chauveau, J., David, P., de la Vaissiere, C., Del Buono, L., Genat, J. F., Hamon, O., Le Diberder, F., Lebbolo, H., Leruste, P., Lory, J., Martin, L., Roos, L., Stark, J., Versille, S., Zhang, B., Manfredi, P. F., Ratti, L., Re, V., Speziali, V., Frank, E. D., Gladney, L., Guo, Q. H., Panetta, J. H., Angelini, C., Batignani, G., Bettarini, S., Bondioli, M., Bosi, F., Carpinelli, M., Forti, F., Giorgi, M. A., Lusiani, A., Martinez-Vidal, F., Morganti, M., Neri, N., Paoloni, E., Rama, M., Rizzo, G., Sandrelli, F., Simi, G., Triggiani, G., Walsh, J., Haire, M., Judd, D., Paick, K., Turnbull, L., Wagoner, D. E., Albert, J., Bula, C., Fernholz, R., Lu, C., McDonald, K. T., Miftakov, V., Sands, B., Schaffner, S. F., Smith, A. J., Tumanov, A., Varnes, E. W., Bronzini, F., Buccheri, A., Bulfon, C., Cavoto, G., del Re, D., Faccini, R., Ferrarotto, F., Ferroni, F., Fratini, K., Lamanna, E., Leonardi, E., Mazzoni, M. A., Morganti, S., Piredda, G., Tehrani, E. S., Serra, M., Voena, C., Waldi, R., Jacques, P. E., Kalelkar, M., Plano, R. J., Adye, T., Claxton, B., Franek, B., Galagedera, S., Geddes, N. I., Gopa, G. P., Lidbury, J., Xella, S. M., Aleksan, R., Besson, P., Bourgeois, P., De Domenico, G., Emery, S., Gaidot, A., Ganzhur, S. F., Gosset, L., de Monchenault, G. H., Kozanecki, W., Langer, M., London, G. W., Mayer, B., Serfass, B., Vasseur, G., Yeche, C., Zito, M., Copty, N., Purohit, M. V., Singh, H., Yumiceva, F. X., Adam, I., Anthony, P. L., Aston, D., Baird, K., Bartelt, J., Becla, J., Bell, R., BLOOM, E., Boeheim, C. T., Boyarski, A. M., Boyce, R. F., Bulos, F., Burgess, W., Byers, B., Calderini, G., Claus, R., Convery, M. R., Coombes, R., Cottrell, L., Coupal, D. P., Coward, D. H., Craddock, W. W., DeSstaebler, H., Dorfan, J., Doser, M., Dunwoodie, W., Ecklund, S., Fieguth, T. H., Field, R. C., Freytag, D. R., Glanzman, T., Godfrey, G. L., Grosso, P., Haller, G., Hanushevsky, A., Harris, J., Hasan, A., Hewett, J. L., Himel, T., Huffer, M. E., Innes, W. R., Jessop, C. P., Kawahara, H., Keller, L., Kelsey, M. H., Kim, P., Klaisner, L. A., Kocian, M. L., Krebs, H. J., Kunz, P. F., Langenegger, U., Langeveld, W., Leith, D. W., Louie, S. K., Luitz, S., Luth, V., Lynch, H. L., MacDonald, J., Manzin, G., Marsiske, H., McCulloch, M., McShurley, D., Menke, S., Messner, R., Metcalfe, S., Moffeit, K. C., Mount, R., Muller, D. R., Nelson, D., Nordby, M., O'Grady, C. P., O'Neill, F. G., Oxoby, G., Pavel, T., Perl, J., Petrak, S., Putallaz, G., Quinn, H., Raines, P. E., Ratcliff, B. N., Reif, R., Robertson, S. H., Rochester, L. S., Roodman, A., Russell, J. J., Sapozhnikov, L., Saxton, O. H., Schietinger, T., Schindler, R. H., Schwiening, J., Seeman, J. T., Serbo, V. V., Skarpass, K., Snyder, A., Soha, A., Spanier, S. M., Stah, A., Stelzer, J., Su, D., Sullivan, M. K., Talby, M., Tanaka, H. A., Va'vra, J., Wagner, S. R., Weinstein, A. J., WHITE, J. L., Wienands, U., Wisniewski, W. J., Young, C. C., Zioulas, G., Burchat, P. R., Cheng, C. H., Kirkby, D., Meyer, T. I., Roat, C., de Silva, A., Henderson, R., Berridge, S., Bugg, W., Cohn, H., Hart, E., Weidemann, A. W., Benninger, T., Izen, J. M., Kitayama, I., Lou, X. C., Turcotte, M., Bianchi, F., Bona, M., Di Girolamo, B., Gamba, D., Smol, A., Zanin, D., Bosisio, L., Della Ricca, G., Lanceri, L., Pompili, A., Poropat, P., Vuagnin, G., Panvini, R. S., Brown, C. M., Kowalewski, R., Roney, J. M., Band, H. R., Charles, E., Dasu, S., Elmer, P., Hu, H., Johnson, J. R., Nielsen, J., Orejudos, W., Pan, Y., Prepost, R., Scott, I. J., von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H., Wu, S. L., Yu, Z., Zobernig, H., Kordich, T. M., Moore, T. B., Neal, H. 2001; 86 (12): 2515-2522

    Abstract

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in neutral B decays to several CP eigenstates. The measurement uses a data sample of 23x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BbarB decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. In this sample, we find events in which one neutral B meson is fully reconstructed in a CP eigenstate containing charmonium and the flavor of the other neutral B meson is determined from its decay products. The amplitude of the CP-violating asymmetry, which in the standard model is proportional to sin2beta, is derived from the decay time distributions in such events. The result is sin2beta = 0.34+/-0.20 (stat)+/-0.05 (syst).

    View details for Web of Science ID 000167573800008

    View details for PubMedID 11289970

  • Novel wax esters and hydrocarbons in the cuticular surface lipids of the red harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex barbatus COMPARATIVE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY B-BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Nelson, D. R., Tissot, M., Nelson, L. J., Fatland, C. L., GORDON, D. M. 2001; 128 (3): 575-595

    Abstract

    The cuticular surface lipids of the red harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex barbatus, were found to contain minor amounts of novel wax esters, in addition to the major components, hydrocarbons. The wax esters ranged in carbon number from C19 to C31 and consisted of esters of both odd- and even-numbered alcohols and acids. Each wax ester with a given carbon number eluted at several different retention times indicating possible methyl branching in either the fatty acid or alcohol moiety, or in both moieties. Each eluting peak of wax esters consisted of a mixture of wax esters of the same carbon number in which the fatty acid moiety ranged from C8 to C18, and the alcohol moiety ranged from C8 to C17. Some wax esters were largely found on the head indicating they may be of a glandular origin. The hydrocarbons consisted of: n-alkanes, C23 to C33; odd-numbered n-alkenes, C27 to C35; and the major components, methyl-branched alkanes, C26 to over C49. Notable components of the methyl-branched alkanes were 2-methyltriacontane, and the novel trimethylalkanes with a single methylene between the first and second branch points, 13,15,19-trimethylhentriacontane and 13,15,21-trimethyltritriacontane.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000167569500021

    View details for PubMedID 11250553

  • Small crack growth in combined bending-torsion fatigue of A533B steel FATIGUE & FRACTURE OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS & STRUCTURES Park, J., Nelson, D., Rostami, A. 2001; 24 (3): 179-191
  • Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome NATURE Lander, E. S., Int Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, Linton, L. M., Birren, B., Nusbaum, C., Zody, M. C., Baldwin, J., Devon, K., Dewar, K., Doyle, M., FitzHugh, W., Funke, R., Gage, D., Harris, K., Heaford, A., Howland, J., Kann, L., Lehoczky, J., Levine, R., McEwan, P., McKernan, K., Meldrim, J., Mesirov, J. P., Miranda, C., Morris, W., Naylor, J., Raymond, C., Rosetti, M., Santos, R., Sheridan, A., Sougnez, C., Stange-Thomann, N., Stojanovic, N., Subramanian, A., Wyman, D., Rogers, J., Sulston, J., Ainscough, R., Beck, S., Bentley, D., Burton, J., Clee, C., CARTER, N., Coulson, A., Deadman, R., Deloukas, P., Dunham, A., Dunham, I., Durbin, R., French, L., Grafham, D., Gregory, S., Hubbard, T., Humphray, S., Hunt, A., Jones, M., LLOYD, C., McMurray, A., Matthews, L., Mercer, S., Milne, S., Mullikin, J. C., Mungall, A., Plumb, R., Ross, M., Shownkeen, R., Sims, S., Waterston, R. H., Wilson, R. K., Hillier, L. W., McPherson, J. D., Marra, M. A., Mardis, E. R., Fulton, L. A., Chinwalla, A. T., Pepin, K. H., Gish, W. R., Chissoe, S. L., Wendl, M. C., Delehaunty, K. D., Miner, T. L., Delehaunty, A., Kramer, J. B., Cook, L. L., Fulton, R. S., Johnson, D. L., Minx, P. J., Clifton, S. W., Hawkins, T., Branscomb, E., Predki, P., Richardson, P., Wenning, S., Slezak, T., Doggett, N., Cheng, J. F., Olsen, A., Lucas, S., Elkin, C., Uberbacher, E., Frazier, M., Gibbs, R. A., Muzny, D. M., Scherer, S. E., Bouck, J. B., Sodergren, E. J., Worley, K. C., Rives, C. M., Gorrell, J. H., Metzker, M. L., NAYLOR, S. L., Kucherlapati, R. S., Nelson, D. L., Weinstock, G. M., SAKAKI, Y., Fujiyama, A., Hattori, M., Yada, T., Toyoda, A., Itoh, T., Kawagoe, C., Watanabe, H., Totoki, Y., Taylor, T., Weissenbach, J., Heilig, R., Saurin, W., Artiguenave, F., Brottier, P., Bruls, T., Pelletier, E., Robert, C., Wincker, P., Rosenthal, A., Platzer, M., Nyakatura, G., Taudien, S., Rump, A., Yang, H. M., Yu, J., Wang, J., Huang, G. Y., Gu, J., Hood, L., Rowen, L., Madan, A., Qin, S. Z., Davis, R. W., Federspiel, N. A., Abola, A. P., Proctor, M. J., Myers, R. M., Schmutz, J., Dickson, M., Grimwood, J., Cox, D. R., Olson, M. V., Kaul, R., Raymond, C., Shimizu, N., Kawasaki, K., Minoshima, S., Evans, G. A., Athanasiou, M., Schultz, R., Roe, B. A., Chen, F., Pan, H. Q., Ramser, J., Lehrach, H., Reinhardt, R., McCombie, W. R., de la Bastide, M., Dedhia, N., Blocker, H., Hornischer, K., Nordsiek, G., Agarwala, R., Aravind, L., Bailey, J. A., Bateman, A., Batzoglou, S., Birney, E., Bork, P., Brown, D. G., Burge, C. B., Cerutti, L., Chen, H. C., Church, D., Clamp, M., Copley, R. R., Doerks, T., Eddy, S. R., Eichler, E. E., Furey, T. S., Galagan, J., Gilbert, J. G., Harmon, C., Hayashizaki, Y., Haussler, D., Hermjakob, H., Hokamp, K., Jang, W. H., Johnson, L. S., Jones, T. A., Kasif, S., Kaspryzk, A., Kennedy, S., Kent, W. J., Kitts, P., Koonin, E. V., Korf, I., Kulp, D., Lancet, D., Lowe, T. M., McLysaght, A., Mikkelsen, T., Moran, J. V., Mulder, N., Pollara, V. J., Ponting, C. P., Schuler, G., Schultz, J. R., Slater, G., Smit, A. F., Stupka, E., Szustakowki, J., Thierry-Mieg, D., Thierry-Mieg, J., Wagner, L., Wallis, J., Wheeler, R., Williams, A., Wolf, Y. I., Wolfe, K. H., Yang, S. P., Yeh, R. F., Collins, F., Guyer, M. S., Peterson, J., Felsenfeld, A., Wetterstrand, K. A., Patrinos, A., Morgan, M. J. 2001; 409 (6822): 860-921

    Abstract

    The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine and evolution. Here we report the results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/35057062

    View details for Web of Science ID 000166938800058

    View details for PubMedID 11237011

  • Evaluation of an energy-based approach and a critical plane approach for predicting constant amplitude multiaxial fatigue life (vol 22, pg 23, 2000) INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FATIGUE Park, J., Nelson, D. 2000; 22 (4): 349-349
  • The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster SCIENCE Adams, M. D., Celniker, S. E., Holt, R. A., Evans, C. A., Gocayne, J. D., Amanatides, P. G., Scherer, S. E., Li, P. W., Hoskins, R. A., Galle, R. F., George, R. A., Lewis, S. E., Richards, S., Ashburner, M., Henderson, S. N., Sutton, G. G., Wortman, J. R., Yandell, M. D., Zhang, Q., Chen, L. X., Brandon, R. C., Rogers, Y. H., Blazej, R. G., Champe, M., Pfeiffer, B. D., Wan, K. H., Doyle, C., Baxter, E. G., Helt, G., Nelson, C. R., Miklos, G. L., Abril, J. F., Agbayani, A., An, H. J., Andrews-Pfannkoch, C., Baldwin, D., Ballew, R. M., Basu, A., Baxendale, J., Bayraktaroglu, L., Beasley, E. M., Beeson, K. Y., Benos, P. V., Berman, B. P., Bhandari, D., Bolshakov, S., Borkova, D., Botchan, M. R., Bouck, J., Brokstein, P., Brottier, P., Burtis, K. C., Busam, D. A., Butler, H., Cadieu, E., Center, A., Chandra, I., Cherry, J. M., Cawley, S., Dahlke, C., Davenport, L. B., DAVIES, A., de Pablos, B., Delcher, A., Deng, Z. M., Mays, A. D., Dew, I., Dietz, S. M., Dodson, K., Doup, L. E., Downes, M., Dugan-Rocha, S., Dunkov, B. C., Dunn, P., Durbin, K. J., Evangelista, C. C., Ferraz, C., Ferriera, S., Fleischmann, W., Fosler, C., Gabrielian, A. E., Garg, N. S., Gelbart, W. M., Glasser, K., Glodek, A., Gong, F. C., Gorrell, J. H., Gu, Z. P., Guan, P., Harris, M., Harris, N. L., Harvey, D., Heiman, T. J., HERNANDEZ, J. R., Houck, J., Hostin, D., Houston, D. A., Howland, T. J., Wei, M. H., Ibegwam, C., Jalali, M., Kalush, F., Karpen, G. H., Ke, Z. X., Kennison, J. A., Ketchum, K. A., Kimmel, B. E., Kodira, C. D., Kraft, C., Kravitz, S., Kulp, D., Lai, Z. W., Lasko, P., Lei, Y. D., Levitsky, A. A., Li, J. Y., Li, Z. Y., Liang, Y., Lin, X. Y., Liu, X. J., Mattei, B., McIntosh, T. C., McLeod, M. P., McPherson, D., Merkulov, G., Milshina, N. V., Mobarry, C., Morris, J., Moshrefi, A., Mount, S. M., Moy, M., Murphy, B., Murphy, L., Muzny, D. M., Nelson, D. L., Nelson, D. R., Nelson, K. A., Nixon, K., Nusskern, D. R., Pacleb, J. M., Palazzolo, M., Pittman, G. S., Pan, S., Pollard, J., Puri, V., Reese, M. G., Reinert, K., Remington, K., Saunders, R. D., Scheeler, F., Shen, H., Shue, B. C., Siden-Kiamos, I., Simpson, M., Skupski, M. P., Smith, T., Spier, E., Spradling, A. C., Stapleton, M., Strong, R., Sun, E., Svirskas, R., Tector, C., Turner, R., Venter, E., Wang, A. H., Wang, X., Wang, Z. Y., Wassarman, D. A., Weinstock, G. M., Weissenbach, J., Williams, S. M., Woodage, T., Worley, K. C., Wu, D., Yang, S., Yao, Q. A., Ye, J., Yeh, R. F., Zaveri, J. S., Zhan, M., Zhang, G. G., Zhao, Q., Zheng, L. S., Zheng, X. Q., Zhong, F. N., Zhong, W. Y., Zhou, X. J., Zhu, S. P., Zhu, X. H., Smith, H. O., Gibbs, R. A., Myers, E. W., Rubin, G. M., Venter, J. C. 2000; 287 (5461): 2185-2195

    Abstract

    The fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensively studied organisms in biology and serves as a model system for the investigation of many developmental and cellular processes common to higher eukaryotes, including humans. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of nearly all of the approximately 120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map. Efforts are under way to close the remaining gaps; however, the sequence is of sufficient accuracy and contiguity to be declared substantially complete and to support an initial analysis of genome structure and preliminary gene annotation and interpretation. The genome encodes approximately 13,600 genes, somewhat fewer than the smaller Caenorhabditis elegans genome, but with comparable functional diversity.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000086049100033

    View details for PubMedID 10731132

  • Analysis of Time-Varying Biological Data Using Rainflow Cycle Counting Comput Meth Biomech Biomed Eng Jacobs, C., Yellowley, C., Nelson, Donahue, H. 2000; 1 (3): 31-40
  • Evaluation of an energy-based approach and a critical plane approach for predicting constant amplitude multiaxial fatigue life INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FATIGUE Park, J., Nelson, D. 2000; 22 (1): 23-39
  • In-Phase and Out-of-Phase Combined Bending-Torsion Fatigue of a Notched Specimen In: Multiaxial Fatigue and Deformation: Testing and Prediction, ASTM STP Park, J., Nelson, D. 2000; 1387: 246-265
  • A fiber optic sensor for transverse strain measurement EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICS Lawrence, C. M., Nelson, D. V., Udd, E., Bennett, T. 1999; 39 (3): 202-209
  • Understanding thermal behavior in the LENS process MATERIALS & DESIGN Griffith, M. L., Schlienger, M. E., Harwell, L. D., Oliver, M. S., Baldwin, M. D., Ensz, M. T., Essien, M., Brooks, J., Robino, C. V., Smugeresky, J. E., Hofmeister, W. H., Wert, M. J., Nelson, D. V. 1999; 20 (2-3): 107-113
  • Residual Stress Determination by a Holographic-Hole Drilling Technique In: Multiaxial Fatigue of an Induction Hardened Shaft, SAE AE28 Nelson, D., Makino, A., Foss, S. 1999: 53-60
  • The BaBar drift chamber NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Sciolla, G., Bajic, A., Bard, R., Beaulieu, M., BLINOV, V., Borsato, E., Boucham, A., Boutigny, D., Boyarski, A., Boyce, R., Britton, D., Brochu, B., Bronzini, F., Broomer, B., Buccheri, A., Caracciolo, R., Colecchia, F., Coupal, D., Cowan, R. F., Coward, D., DalCorso, F., Dallapiccola, C., DeBonis, I., Dorfan, D., Dow, S., Dusatko, J., Erdos, E., Fanin, C., Fernandez, J., Fernholz, R., Ferrarotto, F., Ferroni, F., Fong, D., Ford, W. T., Gaddi, A., Galeazzi, F., Goodenough, C., Gritsan, A., Harris, J., Harton, J., Hasan, A., Hearty, C., Heise, J., Henderson, R., Hodgson, J., Houde, M., Jawahery, H., Jeremie, A., Johnson, D. R., Karcher, A., Karyotakis, Y., Kelsey, M., Khan, N., Kowalewski, R. V., Krieg, H., Lafaye, R., Lamanna, E., Lanting, T., Levi, M., Lu, C., MacFarlane, D., Malchow, R., Martin, J. P., Mazzoni, M. A., McDonald, K. T., McDougald, M., McKenna, J., Miller, W., Momayezi, M., Morandin, M., Morganti, M., Morganti, S., Morii, M., Nelson, D., Palrang, M., Park, H., Patel, P., Piredda, G., Pitman, D., Posocco, M., Raffaelli, F., Rankin, P., Roney, J. M., Roy, J., Sadrozinski, H., Sands, W. R., SANTI, S., Schaffner, S., Schumm, B., Seitz, R., Serra, M., Smith, J. G., Smith, A. J., Smy, M., Snyder, A., Spencer, N., Stroili, C., Taras, P., Torassa, E., Trischuk, J., Voci, C., Wagner, S., Warner, D., Weinstein, A., Woch, A., Yamamoto, R. K., Zacek, V., vonderLippe, H. 1998; 419 (2-3): 310-314
  • An embedded fiber optic sensor method for determining residual stresses in fiber-reinforced composite materials JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENT MATERIAL SYSTEMS AND STRUCTURES Lawrence, C. M., Nelson, D. V., Bennett, T. E., Spingarn, J. R. 1998; 9 (10): 788-799
  • Thermal behavior in the LENS process SOLID FREEFORM FABRICATION PROCEEDINGS, AUGUST, 1998 Griffith, M. L., Schlienger, M. E., Harwell, L. D., Oliver, M. S., Baldwin, M. D., Ensz, M. T., Smugeresky, J. E., Essien, M., Brooks, J., Robino, C. V., Hofmeister, W. H., Wert, M. J., Nelson, D. V. 1998: 89-96
  • Biaxial fatigue of A533B pressure vessel steel JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY-TRANSACTIONS OF THE ASME Nelson, D. V., Rostami, A. 1997; 119 (3): 325-331
  • Advances in multiaxial fatigue life prediction for components with stress concentrations INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FATIGUE Tipton, S. M., Nelson, D. V. 1997; 19 (6): 503-515
  • In-Phase and Out-of-Phase Combined Bending-Torsion Fatigue of A533B Steel. J Press Vessel Technol Nelson, D., Rostami, A. 1997; 3 (119): 325-331
  • Determination of sub-surface distributions of residual stresses by a holographic-hole drilling technique JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY-TRANSACTIONS OF THE ASME Makino, A., Nelson, D. V. 1997; 119 (1): 95-103
  • The holographic-hole drilling method for residual stress determination OPTICS AND LASERS IN ENGINEERING Nelson, D. V., Makino, A., Fuchs, E. A. 1997; 27 (1): 3-23
  • Determination of biaxial residual stresses by a holographic-hole drilling technique JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY-TRANSACTIONS OF THE ASME Makino, A., Nelson, D. V., Fuch, E. A., Williams, D. R. 1996; 118 (4): 583-588
  • GONADAL MOSAICISM FOR INCONTINENTIA PIGMENTI IN A HEALTHY MALE JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS KIRCHMAN, T. T., Levy, M. L., Lewis, R. A., Kanzler, M. H., Nelson, D. L., Scheuerle, A. E. 1995; 32 (11): 887-890

    Abstract

    Incontinentia pigmenti (IP) is a genodermatosis that segregates as an X linked dominant trait with male lethality. The disease has been linked to Xq28 in a number of studies. A few affected males have been documented, most of whom have a 47,XXY karyotype. We report a family with two paternally related half sisters, each affected with IP. The father is healthy, clinically normal, and has a 46,XY normal male karyotype. Linkage analysis of 12 polymorphic markers (two X linked and 10 autosomal) confirms paternity. X inactivation studies with the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) indicate that the paternal X chromosome is inactivated preferentially in each girl, implying that this chromosome carries the IP mutation, and that the father is a gonadal mosaic for the IP mutation.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995TC96200012

    View details for PubMedID 8592334

  • EFFECT OF SURFACE CONDITION AND PRIOR PLASTIC-DEFORMATION ON X-RAY EFFECTIVE ELASTIC PARAMETERS IN A STEEL AND ITS WELD EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUES Hampton, R. W., Nelson, D. V. 1995; 19 (4): 25-28
  • FATIGUE AND FRACTURE ESTIMATION FOR METALLIC COMPONENTS - SOME CURRENT METHODS AND FUTURE-DEVELOPMENTS JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL DESIGN Nelson, D. V., Sheppard, S. D. 1995; 117: 121-127
  • Fatigue and Fracture Estimation: Some Current Methods and Future Developments J Mech Des Nelson, D., Sheppard, S. 1995; 117: 121-127
  • ACTIVATION AND INHIBITION OF THE HYPOTHALAMIC-PITUITARY-ADRENAL AXIS OF THE NEONATAL RAT - EFFECTS OF MATERNAL-DEPRIVATION PSYCHONEUROENDOCRINOLOGY Suchecki, D., NELSON, D. Y., VANOERS, H., LEVINE, S. 1995; 20 (2): 169-182

    Abstract

    These studies investigated the activation and inhibition (negative feedback) of the neonatal rat. The ACTH response of maternally deprived pups is persistently elevated for 30 min, suggesting a deficiency in the negative feedback system. In Experiment 1, we examined the time-course of corticosterone (CORT) and ACTH responses to a saline injection over a 120-min period during development. In deprived pups, CORT and ACTH were persistently elevated throughout the testing period, whereas only 15-day-old nondeprived pups showed ACTH and CORT elevations. Further nondeprived and deprived pups were exposed twice to ether (Experiment 2) or saline injections (Experiment 3) separated by a 1-h interval. Nondeprived pups showed an augmented ACTH response to double exposure to ether, but not to saline. No CORT response to either stimulus was observed. In response to one exposure of each stimulus, deprived pups showed increased ACTH and CORT values and no further elevation to repeated exposure. These results suggest the negative feedback system of neonates is immature, but partially functional in deprived pups. Moreover, nondeprived pups show a stressor-specific response to stress, whereas deprived animals show a similar response to different stimuli.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995PU09900005

    View details for PubMedID 7899536

  • A STUDY OF THE GROWTH OF SMALL FATIGUE CRACKS IN A HIGH-STRENGTH STEEL USING A SURFACE-ACOUSTIC-WAVE TECHNIQUE FATIGUE & FRACTURE OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS & STRUCTURES Nelson, D. V., YUCE, H. H., CHOW, L. G. 1994; 17 (11): 1357-1369
  • RESIDUAL-STRESS DETERMINATION BY SINGLE-AXIS HOLOGRAPHIC-INTERFEROMETRY AND HOLE DRILLING .1. THEORY EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICS Makino, A., Nelson, D. 1994; 34 (1): 66-78
  • RESIDUAL-STRESS DETERMINATION BY SINGLE-AXIS HOLOGRAPHIC-INTERFEROMETRY AND HOLE DRILLING .2. EXPERIMENTS EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICS Nelson, D., Fuchs, E., Makino, A., Williams, D. 1994; 34 (1): 79-88
  • Residual Stress Determination by Single-Axis Holographic Interferometry and Hole Drilling - Part II: Experiments. Exp Mech Nelson, D., Fuchs, E., Makino, A., Williams, D. 1994; 1 (34): 79-88
  • Residual Stress Determination by Single-Axis Holographic Interferometry and Hole Drilling - Part I: Theory Exp Mech Makino, A., Nelson, D. 1994; 1 (34): 66-78
  • THE LEAD LIQUID ARGON SAMPLING CALORIMETER OF THE SLD DETECTOR NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Axen, D., Bougerolle, S., Sobie, R., Eigen, G., DeJongh, F., Hitlin, D., Kelsey, M., Klein, M., Mincer, A., Wisniewski, W., Wolf, R., Arroyo, C., Au, Y., Baltay, C., Bolton, T., Bazarko, A., Camilleri, L., Hyatt, E., Manly, S., Rabinowitz, S., Rowson, P. C., SELIGMAN, S., Shaevitz, M. H., Smith, S., STEINER, R. V., Abt, I., ALZOFON, D., Arnett, D., Barrera, F., Bell, R., BES, S. C., Bogart, J., Breidenbach, M., Candia, A., Claus, R., Cutler, H., Davis, R., Dubois, R., Foss, M., Fox, J., Fox, M., GIOUMOUSIS, A., GREBENYUK, A., Haller, G., Hamilton, V., Hodgson, J., Huffer, M., Junk, T., Kim, P., Labs, J., Neal, H., Nelson, D., Nordby, M., Paffrath, L., Putallaz, G., Rogers, H., Russell, J. J., Saez, P., SEWARD, P., SHERDEN, D., Skarpaas, K., Schindler, R. H., Waite, A. P., Watt, R., Brau, J., BUGG, B., Weidemann, A., GURD, D., Oram, C., Astbury, A., Beer, G., Cross, G., Hodges, T., Honma, A., Keeler, R., Langstaff, R., Mason, G., Poffenberger, P., Robertson, L., Schenk, P., Turcot, A., Turcotte, M., Cook, V., Forbush, D., Harrison, J., Kim, H., Ji, M., Mockett, P., Toevs, F., Vella, E. 1993; 328 (3): 472-494
  • 1ST MEASUREMENT OF THE LEFT-RIGHT CROSS-SECTION ASYMMETRY IN Z-BOSON PRODUCTION BY E+E- COLLISIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS Abe, K., Abt, I., Acton, P. D., ADOLPHSEN, C. E., Agnew, G., Alber, C., ALZOFON, D. F., Antilogus, P., Arroyo, C., Ash, W. W., Ashford, V., Astbury, A., Aston, D., Au, Y., AXEN, D. A., Bacchetta, N., Baird, K. G., Baker, W., Baltay, C., Band, H. R., Baranko, G., Bardon, O., Barrera, F., Battiston, R., Bazarko, A. O., Bean, A., Beer, G., BELCINSKI, R. J., Bell, R. A., Bendavid, R., Benvenuti, A. C., Berger, R., Berridge, S. C., Bethke, S., Biasini, M., Bienz, T., Bilei, G. M., Bird, F., Bisello, D., Blaylock, G., BLUMBERG, R., Bogart, J. R., Bolton, T., Bougerolle, S., Bower, G. R., Boyce, R. F., Brau, J. E., Breidenbach, M., Browder, T. E., Bugg, W. M., Burgess, B., Burke, D., Burnett, T. H., Burrows, P. N., Busza, W., BYERS, B. L., Calcaterra, A., Caldwell, D. O., Calloway, D., Camanzi, B., Camilleri, L., Carpinelli, M., Carr, J., Cartwright, S., Cassell, R., Castaldi, R., Castro, A., CAVALLISFORZA, M., Chadwick, G. B., Chamberlain, O., Chambers, D., Chen, L., Clarke, P. E., Claus, R., Clendenin, J., Cohn, H. O., Coller, J. A., Cook, V., Cords, D., Cotton, R., Cowan, R. F., Coyle, P. A., Coyne, D. G., Craddock, W., Cutler, H., DOLIVEIRA, A., Damerell, C. J., Dasu, S., Davis, R., deSangro, R., Desimone, P., DeSimone, S., Dean, T., Decker, F. J., DeJongh, F., DELLORSO, R., Disco, A., Dolin, R., Downing, R. W., Du, Y. C., Dubois, R., Duboscq, J. E., Dunwoodie, W., DURRETT, D. D., ECKLUND, S. D., Eigen, G., Eisenstein, B. I., Elia, R., EMMA, P. J., EMMET, W. T., English, R. L., Erdos, E., Escalera, J., Fan, C., Fero, M. J., Ferrie, J., Fieguth, T., Flynn, J., FORBUSH, D. A., Fortune, K. M., Fox, J. D., Fox, M. J., Frey, R., Freytag, D. R., Friedman, J. I., Frisch, J., Fujimoto, J., Furuno, K., Gaillard, M., Gallinaro, M., GARWIN, E., Gillman, T., GIOUMOUSIS, A., Gladding, G., Gonzalez, S., GURD, D. P., Hale, D. L., HALLER, G. M., Hallewell, G. D., Hamilton, V., Haney, M. J., HANSLKOZANECKA, T., HARGIS, H., Harrison, J., Hart, E. L., Hasegawa, K., Hasegawa, Y., Hedges, S., Hertzbach, S. S., Hildreth, M. D., HILOMEN, R. C., HIMEL, T. M., Hitlin, D. G., Hodges, T. A., Hodgson, J., HOEFLICH, J. J., Honma, A., HORELICK, D., Huber, J., Huffer, M. E., Hughes, E. W., Hwang, H., Hyatt, E., Iwasaki, Y., Izen, J. M., Jobe, R. K., Jacques, P., Jako, C., Johnson, A. S., Johnson, J. R., Johnson, R. A., Jones, S., Junk, T., Kaiser, S., Kajikawa, R., Kalelkar, M., Kang, H., Karliner, I., Kawahara, H., Keeler, R. K., Kelsey, M. H., Kendall, H. W., KHARAKH, D., Kim, H. Y., Kim, P. C., King, R., Klein, M., Kofler, R. R., Kowitt, M., Krejcik, P., Krishna, N. M., Kroeger, R. S., Kulikov, A. V., Kunz, P. F., Kwon, Y., Labs, J. F., LANGSTAFF, R. R., Langston, M., Larsen, R., Lath, A., Lauber, J. A., Leith, D. W., Limberg, T., Lintern, L., Liu, X., Loreti, M., Lu, A., Lynch, H. L., Lyons, T., Ma, J., Majid, W. A., Mancinelli, G., Manly, S., Mansour, D., Mantovani, G., Markiewicz, T. W., Maruyama, T., Mason, G. R., Masuda, H., Mathys, L., Mazaheri, G., Mazzucato, A., Mazzucato, E., McCormick, D. J., McGowan, J. F., McHugh, S., McKemey, A. K., Meadows, B. T., Mellor, D. J., Messner, R., Mincer, A. I., Minty, M., Mockett, P. M., Moffeit, K. C., Morrison, R. J., Mours, B., Mueller, G., Muller, D., Mundy, G., Nagamine, T., Nauenberg, U., Neal, H., Nelson, D., Nesterov, V., Nordby, M., Nussbaum, M., Nuttall, A., Ogren, H., Olsen, J., Oram, C., Osborne, L. S., OSSA, R., Oxoby, G., Paffrath, L., PALOUNEK, A., Panvini, R. S., Park, H., Pauluzzi, M., Pavel, T. J., Perrier, F., Peruzzi, I., Pescara, L., Peters, D., Petersen, H., PETRADZA, M., PHINNEY, N., Piccolo, M., Piemontese, L., Pieroni, E., Pitthan, R., Pitts, K. T., Plano, R. J., Poffenberger, P. R., Prepost, R., Prescott, C. Y., Pripstein, D., Punkar, G. D., Putallaz, G., Raimondi, P., Rankin, P., Ratcliff, B. N., Reeves, T. W., Rensing, P. E., Richman, J. D., RINTA, R., Robertson, L. P., Rochester, L. S., Rosenson, L., Ross, M. C., Rothberg, J. E., Rothenberg, A., Rowson, P. C., Russell, J. J., Rust, D., RUTZ, E., Saez, P., SANTHA, A. K., Santocchia, A., Saxton, O. H., Schalk, T., SCHENK, P. R., Schindler, R. H., Schneekloth, U., Schneider, M., Schultz, D., Schultz, G. E., Schumm, B. A., Seeman, J. T., Seiden, A., Servoli, L., Settles, M., Shaevitz, M. H., Shank, J. T., Shapiro, G., Shapiro, S. L., Shaw, H., Sheppard, J. C., Sherden, D. J., Shimomura, T., Shoup, A., SHYPIT, R. L., Siemann, R. H., Simopoulos, C., Skarpaas, K., Smith, S. R., Snyder, A., Snyder, J. A., Sobie, R., Sokoloff, M. D., SPENCE, W. L., Spencer, E. N., STLORANT, S., Stamer, P., Steiner, H., Steiner, R., Stephenson, R. J., Stewart, G., Stiles, P., STOCKDALE, I. E., Strauss, M. G., Su, D., Suekane, F., Sugiyama, A., Suzuki, S., Swartz, M., Szumilo, A., Tahar, M. Z., Takahashi, T., Tang, H., TAPPERN, G. J., Tarnopolsky, G., Taylor, F. E., Tecchio, M., Thaler, J. J., Toevs, F., Toge, N., Turcotte, M., Turk, J. D., Turner, J. L., Usher, T., Vavra, J., Vannini, C., Vella, E., Venuti, J. P., Verdier, R., Verdini, P. G., WADSWORTH, B. F., Waite, A. P., Walker, N. J., Walz, D., Warner, D., Watt, R., Watts, S. J., Weber, T., Weidemann, A. W., Whitaker, J. S., White, S. L., Wickens, F. J., WICKERT, S. A., Williams, D. A., Williams, D. C., Williams, R. W., Williams, S. H., Wilson, R. J., Wisniewski, W. J., Witherell, M. S., WOODLY, M. D., Woods, M., Word, G. B., Wyss, J., Yamamoto, R. K., Yamartino, J. M., Yee, C., Yeremian, A. D., Yellin, S. J., Yim, A., Young, C. C., Young, K. K., Yuta, H., Zapalac, G., Zdarko, R. W., Zeitlin, C., Zhou, J., Ziemann, V., Zolotorev, M., Zucchelli, P. 1993; 70 (17): 2515-2520
  • ON THE USE OF THE HOLE-DRILLING TECHNIQUE FOR RESIDUAL-STRESS MEASUREMENTS IN THIN PLATES JOURNAL OF PRESSURE VESSEL TECHNOLOGY-TRANSACTIONS OF THE ASME Hampton, R. W., Nelson, D. V. 1992; 114 (3): 292-299
  • COMPARISON OF ACELLULAR AND WHOLE-CELL PERTUSSIS-COMPONENT DIPHTHERIA-TETANUS-PERTUSSIS VACCINES IN INFANTS JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS Blumberg, D. A., Mink, C. M., Cherry, J. D., Johnson, C., Garber, R., Plotkin, S. A., Watson, B., Ballanco, G. A., Daum, R. S., Sullivan, B., Townsend, T. R., Brayton, J., Gooch, W. M., Nelson, D. B., Congeni, B. L., Prober, C. G., Hackell, J. G., Dekker, C. L., Christenson, P. D. 1991; 119 (2): 194-204
  • THE INFLUENCE OF TEMPERING TEMPERATURE ON SMALL FATIGUE CRACK BEHAVIOR MONITORED WITH SURFACE ACOUSTIC-WAVES IN QUENCHED AND TEMPERED 4140 STEEL METALLURGICAL TRANSACTIONS A-PHYSICAL METALLURGY AND MATERIALS SCIENCE London, B., Nelson, D. V., SHYNE, J. C. 1989; 20 (7): 1257-1265
  • THE EFFECT OF TEMPERING TEMPERATURE ON NEAR-THRESHOLD FATIGUE CRACK BEHAVIOR IN QUENCHED AND TEMPERED 4140 STEEL METALLURGICAL TRANSACTIONS A-PHYSICAL METALLURGY AND MATERIALS SCIENCE London, B., Nelson, D. V., SHYNE, J. C. 1988; 19 (10): 2497-2502
  • DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF ADVANCED HYBRID CIRCUITS FOR HIGH-ENERGY PHYSICS IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE HALLER, G. M., Moss, J., Freytag, D. R., Nelson, D., Yim, A., Lo, C. C. 1988; 35 (1): 217-221
  • THE ANALOG PROCESSING SYSTEM FOR THE LIQUID ARGON CALORIMETER FOR SLD AT SLAC IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE HALLER, G. M., Nelson, D., Freytag, D. R. 1987; 34 (1): 170-174
  • RESIDUAL-STRESS DETERMINATION THROUGH COMBINED USE OF HOLOGRAPHIC-INTERFEROMETRY AND BLIND-HOLE DRILLING EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICS Nelson, D. V., MCCRICKERD, J. T. 1986; 26 (4): 371-378
  • NEUROGENIC HYPERACUTE ASCITES IN MICE CLINICAL SCIENCE Nelson, D. P., Robin, E. D., Wong, R. J., MORIN, M. E., Bensch, K. G., MURPHY, B. J., Theodore, J. 1986; 71 (3): 327-330

    Abstract

    Four groups of mice were subjected to controlled fatal head trauma and then evaluated for the presence of ascites (neurogenic hyperacute ascites, NHA). The animals died virtually instantaneously and without evidence of maintained pain or suffering. The volume of ascites was determined in one group of animals. Two of the traumatized groups were pretreated, one with the beta-blocker propranolol and the other with the alpha-blocker phentolamine. A fifth, non-traumatized, group which was killed with either inhalation served as a control group. Two more groups of non-traumatized mice were administered either the alpha-adrenergic agonist methoxamine hydrochloride or the beta-agonist isoethrane mesylate before killing by ether inhalation, and then evaluated for ascites. Transudative ascitic fluid was found in 87-100% of untreated traumatized mice and in no control animals. Pretreatment with phentolamine had no effect on the prevalence of ascites. Pretreatment with propranolol produced a significant decrease in the prevalence of ascites compared with trauma alone (P less than 0.001). Isoethrane (beta-agonist) administration caused ascites in 100% of the treated animals. Methoxamine (alpha-agonist) administration did not cause ascites. A previously undescribed consequence of acute brain trauma is described (NHA) which appears to be mediated by beta-sympathetic activity of central origin. NHA is inhibited by beta-blockade and can be simulated with beta-agonist administration.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986D509900016

    View details for PubMedID 2875822

  • PULMONARY ARTERIOVENOUS-MALFORMATIONS - A CRITICAL UPDATE AMERICAN REVIEW OF RESPIRATORY DISEASE Burke, C. M., SAFAI, C., Nelson, D. P., Raffin, T. A. 1986; 134 (2): 334-339

    Abstract

    Although first reported 90 yr ago, the natural history of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM) is still incompletely understood. We review historical perspectives and pathologic classification of this rare disease and identify etiologic factors and clinical features in the 450 reported cases. The many different diagnostic modalities currently available are described, and a logical sequence of investigations is suggested. Pulmonary angiography remains mandatory prior to definitive treatment. The available evidence strongly suggests that morbidity and mortality in untreated PAVM exceeds that associated with either surgical resection or embolic occlusion. Thus, definitive treatment should be offered in all cases, with the possible exception of asymptomatic patients with small lesions who have no evidence of Osler-Weber-Rendu disease. Embolotherapy is now the treatment of choice in institutions with the necessary expertise and facilities, notwithstanding the absence of long-term follow-up for patients treated this way. It is suggested that increased documentation of long-term morbidity and mortality in both treated and untreated patients with PAVM will lead to greater understanding and more effective management of this enigmatic condition.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986D577000030

    View details for PubMedID 3527008

  • SLD LIQUID ARGON CALORIMETER PROTOTYPE TEST-RESULTS IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE Dubois, R., Hodges, T., Langstaff, R., Mason, G. R., Robertson, L. P., Eigen, G., Hitlin, D., Schindler, R. H., Warfield, K., Zhu, Y., Au, Y., Baltay, C., Manly, S., Shaevitz, M. H., Smith, S. R., Sleeman, J., Breidenbach, M., Nelson, D., Nordby, M., Lynch, H., ROTHENBERG, A. F., Skarpaas, K., Wolf, G., Brau, J., Bugg, W., Weidemann, A., LUDGATE, G. A., Oram, C. J., Cook, V., Davisson, R., Duncan, A. L., Forbush, D., Guy, A., Mockett, P. M., Vella, E., Johnson, J. 1986; 33 (1): 194-196
  • UNIVERSAL FILE PROCESSING PROGRAM FOR FIELD PROGRAMMABLE INTEGRATED-CIRCUITS IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE Freytag, D. R., Nelson, D. J. 1985; 32 (1): 332-335
  • LEGIONELLA-PNEUMOPHILA PERICARDITIS WITHOUT PNEUMONIA ARCHIVES OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Nelson, D. P., RENSIMER, E. R., Raffin, T. A. 1985; 145 (5): 926-926

    Abstract

    To our knowledge, Legionella pericarditis has been reported only four times in the literature and only once without pneumonia. We report the second case of nonpneumonic Legionella pericarditis in a man who eventually required pericardiectomy for constriction. Since Legionella endocarditis, myocarditis, and pericarditis have all been documented by culture or direct fluorescent antibody staining, it is important to be aware of the possibility of cardiac legionellosis.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1985AGN4100031

    View details for PubMedID 3994470

  • CARDIAC LEGIONELLOSIS CHEST Nelson, D. P., RENSIMER, E. R., Burke, C. M., Raffin, T. A. 1984; 86 (6): 807-808

    View details for Web of Science ID A1984TV20500003

    View details for PubMedID 6499542

  • THE VAX CAMAC CHANNEL IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE Nelson, D. J., Breidenbach, M., GRANIERI, C. D., GRUND, J. E., PATRICK, J. F., Weaver, L. J. 1981; 28 (1): 336-340
  • SEMI-AUTONOMOUS CONTROLLER FOR DATA ACQUISITION - BRILLIANT ADC IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE Breidenbach, M., Frank, E., Hall, J., Nelson, D. 1978; 25 (1): 706-710
  • REVIEW OF FATIGUE-CRACK-GROWTH PREDICTION METHODS EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICS Nelson, D. V. 1977; 17 (2): 41-49
  • FLUID PIVOT JOURNAL BEARING JOURNAL OF LUBRICATION TECHNOLOGY-TRANSACTIONS OF THE ASME Nelson, D. V., HOLLINGSWORTH, L. W. 1977; 99 (1): 122-128
  • DYNAMICS OF NUCLEAR OVERHAUSER ENHANCEMENT IN PROTON DECOUPLED C-13 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC-RESONANCE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Opella, S. J., Nelson, D. J., Jardetzky, O. 1976; 64 (6): 2533-2535
  • APPROACH TO QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF INTERNAL MOTIONS IN PROTEINS BY MEASUREMENTS OF LONGITUDINAL RELAXATION-TIMES AND NUCLEAR OVERHAUSER ENHANCEMENTS IN PROTON DECOUPLED C-13 NMR-SPECTRA ACS SYMPOSIUM SERIES Opella, S. J., Nelson, D. J., Jardetzky, O. 1976: 397-417
  • C-13 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC-RESONANCE STUDY OF MOLECULAR MOTIONS AND CONFORMATIONAL TRANSITIONS IN MUSCLE CALCIUM-BINDING PARVALBUMINS BIOCHEMISTRY Nelson, D. J., Opella, S. J., Jardetzky, O. 1976; 15 (25): 5552-5560

    Abstract

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to detect the Ca2+ ion controlled conformational transition in muscle calcium binding parvalbumin and to study its intramolecular motions. Nuclear relaxation parameters are used to evaluate the reorientation rates of the protein and some of the amino acid side chains. While peripheral residues exhibit greater motional freedom than the protein interior, an interesting finding is that significant rapid internal motion is present in the phenylalanine rings comprising the hydrophobic core of the protein.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1976CP37600020

    View details for PubMedID 999828

  • FINE-STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF AMYLOID DEPOSITS IN PITUITARY ADENOMA ARCHIVES OF PATHOLOGY Schober, R., Nelson, D. 1975; 99 (8): 403-410

    Abstract

    A pituitary adenoma with amyloid deposits was studied by light and electron microscopy. The amyloid material was radially oriented, deposited in the extracellular space, and often intermingled with small vesicles. It was surrounded by histiocytes with deep cytoplasmic invaginations. The histiocytes contained large autophagic vacuoles in which amyloid was also present. These features are similar to other forms of amyloidosis and suggest a histiocytic origin of the amyloid.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1975AL53700002

    View details for PubMedID 167702

  • DEPOLARIZED LIGHT-SCATTERING AND CARBON NUCLEAR-RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS OF ISOTROPIC ROTATIONAL CORRELATION TIME OF MUSCLE CALCIUM-BINDING PROTEIN JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY Bauer, D. R., Opella, S. J., Nelson, D. J., Pecora, R. 1975; 97 (9): 2580-2582

    View details for Web of Science ID A1975AA53000067

    View details for PubMedID 1133427

  • CARBON MAGNETIC-RESONANCE STUDY OF CONFORMATIONAL-CHANGES IN CARP MUSCLE CALCIUM-BINDING PARVALBUMIN JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY Opella, S. J., Nelson, D. J., JARDETZK, O. 1974; 96 (22): 7157-7159
  • FOURIER-TRANSFORM PHOSPHORUS MAGNETIC-RESONANCE STUDY OF ATP-CALCIUM G-ACTIN COMPLEX BIOCHEMICAL AND BIOPHYSICAL RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS Cozzone, P. J., Nelson, D. J., JARDETZK, O. 1974; 60 (1): 341-347

    View details for Web of Science ID A1974T990500048

    View details for PubMedID 4421143

  • ENCOURAGING CAREER EXPLORATION THROUGH SIMULATED WORK AND VOCATIONAL DETECTIVE EXPERIENCES JOURNAL OF EMPLOYMENT COUNSELING Nelson, D. E., KRUMBOLTZ, J. D. 1970; 7 (2): 58-65

Books and Book Chapters


  • Optical Methods Practical Residual Stress Measurement Methods Nelson, D. Wiley. 2012: 279-302

Conference Proceedings


  • HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS AND RISK OF CHILDHOOD CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM TUMORS IN CALIFORNIA Fisher, P. G., Von Behren, J., Nelson, D. O., Reynolds, P. OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. 2012: 43-44
  • Air Monitoring of Solvents in Nail Salon Shops in California. Thu Quach, Q., Doan-Billings, P., Gunier, R., Nelson, D., Nguyen Dung, D., Okahara, L., Tran, A., Von Behren, J., Reynolds, P. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2011: S271-S272
  • Construction, test and calibration of the GLAST silicon tracker Sgro, C., Atwood, W. B., Baldini, L., Barbiellini, G., Bellazzini, R., Belli, F., Bonamente, E., Borden, T., Bregeon, J., Brez, A., Brigida, M., Caliandro, G. A., Cecchi, C., Cohen-Tanugi, J., De Angelis, A., DRELL, P., Favuzzi, C., Fukazawa, Y., Fusco, P., Gargano, F., Germani, S., Giglietto, N., Giordano, F., Himel, T., Hirayama, M., Johnson, R. P., Katagiri, H., Kataoka, J., Kawai, N., Kroeger, W., Kuss, M., Latronico, L., Longo, F., Loparco, F., Lubrano, P., Massai, M. M., Mazziotta, M. N., Minuti, M., Mizuno, T., Morselli, A., Nelson, D., Nordby, M., Ohsugi, T., Omodei, N., Ozaki, M., Pepe, M., Raino, S., Rando, R., Razzano, M., Rich, D., Sadrozinski, H. W., Scolieri, G., Spandre, G., Spinelli, P., Sugizaki, M., Tajima, H., Takahashi, H., Takahashi, T., Yoshida, S., Young, C., Ziegler, M. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV. 2007: 9-13
  • Bone mineral density in postmenarchal adolescent girls in the United States: Associated biopsychosocial variables and bone turnover markers Harel, Z., Gold, M., Cromer, B., Bruner, A., Stager, M., Bachrach, L., Wolter, K., Reid, C., Hertweck, P., Nelson, A., Nelson, D., Coupey, S., Johnson, C., Burkman, R., Bone, H. ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. 2007: 44-53

    Abstract

    During adolescence, bone formation prevails over resorption, resulting in accumulation of 40% of peak bone mass throughout this time period. Although multiple studies have explored bone mass accrual during the early stages of puberty, less is known about factors that may influence bone accrual during later years of adolescence. In the present cross-sectional study we examined relationships among bone mineral density (BMD) and demographic factors, behavioral variables, and bone metabolism markers in postmenarchal adolescent girls.The population was comprised of 389 healthy postmenarchal adolescent girls aged 11-18 years, who were recruited into a prospective study of the effect of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) on bone health in adolescents. At the baseline visit, investigators collected demographic, reproductive health, and lifestyle data, and performed a complete physical examination. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Before study initiation, BMD at the lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and markers of bone metabolism (serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase [BAP], serum osteocalcin, and urinary N-telopeptide [uNTX]) were measured. The baseline data from this study were analyzed to evaluate possible correlates of BMD in postmenarchal adolescent girls. Potential associations between BMD values and other parameters were assessed by analysis of variance and Pearson's correlation coefficient.Participants enrolled in the study had a mean (+/- SD) chronological age of 14.9 +/-1.7 years (range 11-18), mean gynecologic age of 39.9 +/-23.0 months (range 1-120) postmenarche, and mean BMI of 23.5 +/-4.6 kg/m(2) (range 16.0-42.2). Racial/ethnic distribution was 46% African American, 35% Caucasian, and 19% other races; 9% had previously been pregnant. Positive correlations were observed between lumbar spine BMD and chronological age (r = .301, p < .0001), gynecologic age (r = .349, p < .0001), and BMI (r = .371, p < .0001). Total hip and femoral neck BMD values were significantly higher (p < .05 and p < .05, respectively) in African American participants compared with non-African American participants. Previous history of pregnancy was significantly associated with a lower BMD at the lumbar spine (p < .0001) and the total hip (p < .01) when compared with the BMD of adolescents who had never been pregnant. Cigarette smoking and alcohol use were not associated with significant differences in BMD. Negative correlations were observed between gynecologic age and the levels of BAP (r = -.564, p < .0001), osteocalcin (r = -.349, p < .0001), and uNTX (r = -.281, p < .0001), and between lumbar spine BMD and BAP (r = -.363, p < .0001), osteocalcin (r = -.129, p < .05), and uNTX (r = -.202, p < .001) levels.Our data demonstrate that chronological age, gynecologic age, race/ethnicity, BMI, and previous history of pregnancy are markedly associated with BMD in postmenarchal adolescent girls. Bone accretion in the postmenarchal years continues in the face of a slowdown in bone turnover during this time period.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2006.08.013

    View details for Web of Science ID 000243183000006

    View details for PubMedID 17185205

  • Determinants of bone mineral density in female adolescents. Harel, Z., Gold, M., Cromer, B., Bruner, A., Stager, M., Bachrach, L., Hertweck, P., Nelson, A., Nelson, D., Coupey, S. WILEY-BLACKWELL. 2005: S106-S106
  • Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera (R) 150 mg; DMPA-IM) and bone mineral density in adolescents: Study design, population characteristics, and baseline bone mineral density Johnson, C., Burkman, T., Gold, M., Brown, R., Harel, Z., Bruner, A., Stager, M., Bachrach, L., Hertweck, P., Nelson, A., Nelson, D., Coupey, M., Bone, H. ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. 2005: S62-S63
  • Biologic and environmental risk factors for childhood brain tumors: The California childhood brain tumor study Fisher, P. G., Preston-Martin, S., Wrensch, M. R., Wiemels, J. L., WIENCKE, J. K., McKean-Cowdin, R., Block, G., Metayer, C., Reynolds, P., Von Behren, J., Nelson, D. C., Selvin, S., Stram, D. O., Gauderman, W. J., Tonge, M., Buffler, R. OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. 2004: 426-426
  • Identification of Galectin-1 as a novel hypoxia-regulated protein via proteomic approaches Le, Q., Shi, G., Nelson, D., Patel, D., Zhao, S., Giaccia, A. J., Kong, C., Koong, A. C. ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. 2004: S192-S192
  • The cost of operating institutional review boards (IRBs) Wagner, T. H., Bhandari, A., Chadwick, G. L., Nelson, D. K. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2003: 638-644

    Abstract

    Recent reports have claimed that institutional review boards (IRBs) are underfunded, yet little is known about the costs of operating IRBs. This study estimated the costs for operating high-volume and low-volume IRBs.IRB costs were calculated from published summary data. Costs were standardized to reflect 2001 dollars.Total estimated costs for operating high-volume and low-volume IRBs were $770,674 and $76,626, respectively. The average cost per action, a measure of economic efficiency, was lower for high-volume IRBs ($277 per action) than it was for low-volume IRBs ($799 per action).Although high-volume IRBs are more expensive than are low-volume IRBs in absolute terms, they are more economically efficient. Policy debates should consider the potential savings from large IRBs, perhaps by encouraging small IRBs to merge, although this may result in less local review, control, and oversight.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000184741400014

    View details for PubMedID 12805049

  • Stable crack growth and instability prediction in thin plates and cylinders Hampton, R. W., Nelson, D. PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD. 2003: 469-491
  • Development of a temporally modulated fuel injector with controlled spray dynamics Chang, H., Nelson, D., Sipperley, C., Edwards, C. ASME-AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENG. 2003: 284-291

    View details for DOI 10.1115/1.1496118

    View details for Web of Science ID 000180321800036

  • Keratin hyperphosphorylation as a marker of human liver disease Toivola, D. M., Ku, N. O., Nelson, D. R., Wright, T. L., Omary, M. B. AMER SOC CELL BIOLOGY. 2001: 56A-56A
  • 9th international workshop on fragile X syndrome and X-linked mental retardation Fryns, J. P., Borghgraef, M., Brown, T. W., Chelly, J., Fisch, G. S., Hamel, B., Hanauer, A., Lacombe, D., Luo, L., MacPherson, J. N., Mandel, J. L., Moraine, C., Mulley, J., Nelson, D., Oostra, B., Partington, M., Ramakers, G. J., Ropers, H. H., Rousseau, F., Schwartz, C., Steinbach, P., Stoll, C., Tranebjaerg, L., Turner, G., van Bokhoven, H., Vianna-Morgante, A., Villard, L., Warren, S. T. WILEY-LISS. 2000: 345-360

    View details for Web of Science ID 000089491300001

    View details for PubMedID 11050616

  • Promoting cancer screening among first degree relatives of colon cancer patients. Ahnen, D. J., Hines, S., Vanoni, C., Colange, N., Flynn, P., Bresalier, R., Triadafilopoulos, G., Sontag, S., Berkel, H., Collins, J. F., Nelson, D., Bini, E. W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC. 2000: A442-A442
  • Electronics for the BaBar central drift chamber Albert, J., Bajic, A., Bard, R., Beaulieu, M., BLINOV, V., Boyarski, A., Broomer, B., Coupal, D., Dal Corso, F., Dolinsky, S., Dorfan, D., Dow, S., Dubrovin, M., Dusatko, J., Erdos, E., Faccini, R., Fernandez, J. P., Ford, W. T., Galeazzi, F., Haller, G., Innes, W., Jawahery, A., Kreig, H., Lankford, A. J., Levi, M., von der Lippe, H., MacFarlane, D. B., Martin, J. P., Momayezi, M., Morandin, M., Morii, M., Nelson, D., Nguyen, P., Palrang, M., Roy, J., Sadrozinski, H., Schumm, B., Sciolla, G., Seiden, A., Smith, A. J., SPENCER, E., Soha, A., Taras, P., Varnes, E., Weinstein, A., Wilson, F., Yushkov, A. IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC. 1999: 2027-2032
  • The BaBar drift chamber project Boucham, A., Boutigny, D., De Bonis, I., Jeremie, A., Karyotakis, Y., Lafaye, R., Goodenough, C., Hearty, C., Heise, J., Kelsey, M., McKenna, J., Dorfan, D., Fernandez, J., Sadrozinski, H., Schumm, B., Spencer, N., Harton, J., Malchow, R., Smy, M., Warner, D., Broomer, B., Erdos, E., Ford, W. T., Gritsan, A., Johnson, D. R., Krieg, H., Roy, J., Park, H., Rankin, P., Smith, J. G., Gaddi, A., Morganti, M., Raffaelli, F., Borsato, E., Caracciolo, R., Dal Corso, F., Fanin, C., Morandin, M., Posocco, M., SANTI, S., Stroili, R., Torassa, E., Voci, C., Bronzini, F., Buccheri, A., Ferroni, F., Lamanna, E., Mazzoni, M. A., Morganti, S., Piredda, G., Santacesaria, R., Dow, S., Karcher, A., Levi, M., von der Lippe, H., Momayezi, M., Bard, R., Dallapiccola, C., Fong, D., Jawahery, H., Miller, W., Cowan, R. F., Yamamoto, R. K., Britton, D. I., Fernholz, R., Houde, M., MacFarlane, D. B., Patel, P. M., Trischuk, J., Beaulieu, M., Martin, J. P., Taras, P., Woch, A., Zacek, V., Lu, C., McDonald, K. T., Smith, A. J., Sands, W. R., Bajic, A., Boyarski, A., Boyce, R., Coupal, D., Coward, D., Harris, J., Hodgson, J., McDougald, M., Morii, M., Nelson, D., Palrang, M., Sciolla, G., Schaffner, S., Snyder, A., Wagner, S., Henderson, R., Khan, N., Pitman, D., Roney, J. M. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV. 1998: 46-52
  • Multi-parameter sensing with fiber Bragg gratings Lawrence, C. M., Nelson, D. V. SPIE - INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING. 1996: 24-31
  • BRONCHIAL HYPERREACTIVITY IN THE HUMAN TRANSPLANTED LUNG - DENERVATION HYPERSENSITIVITY Burke, C. M., Theodore, J., Harvey, J., Nelson, D., Jamieson, S. W., Baldwin, J. C., Robin, E. D. SLACK INC. 1986: A693-A693
  • NEUROGENIC PERITONEAL EDEMA ASSOCIATED WITH NEUROGENIC PULMONARY-EDEMA Nelson, D. P., Wong, R. J., MURPHY, B. J., Theodore, J., Robin, E. D. SLACK INC. 1984: A433-A433
  • FINE-STRUCTURE OF AMYLOID IN A PITUITARY ADENOMA Schober, R., Nelson, D. H., Rubinstein, L. J. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 1975: 111-111

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