Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Couples and family therapy, marital relationships, influence of technology on family functioning, child and adolescent mental health, coping with stress
  • Psychiatry

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Director, Stanford Advanced Psychotherapy Program, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (2012 - Present)
  • Chief, Couples and Family Therapy Clinic, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (1993 - Present)
  • Director, Family Therapy Program, VA Palo Alto Health Care System (1992 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Outstanding Professor of the Year Award, PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium (2013)
  • Most Inspiring Mentor Award, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University (2012)
  • Outstanding Professor of the Year Award, PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium (2012)
  • Outstanding Professor of the Year Award, PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium (2011)
  • Academic Faculty Teaching Award, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University (2010)
  • Outstanding Professor of the Year Award, PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium (2009)
  • Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University (1997)
  • Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University (1994)
  • Joan Sadow Award for Excellence in Teaching, Department of Psychiatry, Beth Israel Medical Center (1991)

Professional Education


  • Fellowship:Cornell University Medical College (1986) NY
  • Fellowship:Harvard Medical School - Children's Hospital (1985) MA
  • Professional Education:University of Colorado at Boulder (1/1/85) CO
  • A.B., magna cum laude w/Honors, Brown University, Religious Studies (1979)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


My research interests include understanding the therapeutic alliance in couples and family therapy, family-systems training in medical education, work/family balance, influence of technology on family relationships, and family adaptation to acute and chronic stress. I am currently studying the relationship between therapeutic alliance, treatment process, and treatment outcomes in couples therapy in the VA health care system.

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Primary treatment approaches in child and adolescent psychiatry training. Academic Psychiatry Rait, D. 2012; 36: 487-489
  • Family therapy training in child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Academic Psychiatry Rait, D. 2012; 36: 448-451
  • Opening steps: A structural approach to working with couples. In A. Gurman (Ed.), Clinical casebook of couple therapy. New York: Guilford. Rait, D. 2010: 232-254
  • Schizophrenia: A family psychoeducational approach. In C. Taylor (Ed.), How to practice evidence-based psychiatry: Basic principles and case studies. Washington: American Psychiatric Press. Rait, D., Glick, ID 2010: 225-233
  • A model for reintegrating family therapy training in psychiatric residency programs. Academic Psychiatry Rait, D., Glick, I 2008; 32: 81-86
  • Reintegrating family therapy training in psychiatric residency programs: Making the case. Academic Psychiatry Rait, D., Glick, I 2008; 32: 76-80
  • Marital and family therapy: 4th Edition. Washington: American Psychiatric Press. Glick, I, Berman, E., Clarkin, J., Rait, D. 2000
  • Perspectives on the therapeutic alliance in brief couples and family. In J Safran & JC Muran (Eds.), The therapeutic alliance in brief psychotherapy. Washington: Amer Psych Assn Rait D 1998: 171-191
  • Working with couples and families: A systemic aproach. In M O?Connor (Ed.), Treating the psychological consequences of HIV Rait D, Ross J, Rao S 1997: 225-269
  • Solving family conflicts, Fears and phobias in children, Chronically ill children and adolescents, Family therapy The Parent Handbook: Microsoft Network. Redmond: Microsoft Corporation. Rait, D. 1996
  • AN INFERTILITY PRIMER FOR FAMILY THERAPISTS .1. MEDICAL, SOCIAL, AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DIMENSIONS FAMILY PROCESS Meyers, M., Diamond, R., KEZUR, D., Scharf, C., WEINSHEL, M., RAIT, D. S. 1995; 34 (2): 219-229

    Abstract

    A seemingly "self-evident truth" in most people's lives is that one day they will have children. This universal, biopsychosocial assumption goes unchallenged until a couple faces infertility. Although the effects of such a challenge are profound, infertility is often treated as a nonevent--both within our society as a whole, and within the field of family therapy in particular. To assist clinicians who work with this numerically increasing population, and the many others who have been affected by their encounter with infertility in the past, this article discusses the biological/medical, psychological, and social factors that shape the experience of infertility in our society.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995RK04900008

    View details for PubMedID 7589419

  • AN INFERTILITY PRIMER FOR FAMILY THERAPISTS .2. WORKING WITH COUPLES WHO STRUGGLE WITH INFERTILITY FAMILY PROCESS Meyers, M., WEINSHEL, M., Scharf, C., KEZUR, D., Diamond, R., RAIT, D. S. 1995; 34 (2): 231-240

    Abstract

    The distress of infertility and its medical treatments are profound, and the effects reverberate in each partner, the couple dyad, and the couple's relationships with family, friends, and medical systems. Yet family therapists, like others in our society, are often uninformed or misinformed about the experience of infertility. While the legacies of infertility may be painful and enduring, they often remain unspoken, and hence may be overlooked in standard interviews. This article describes the experiences of couples struggling with infertility, most of whom have sought medical intervention, and it provides treatment interventions for guiding couples through this difficult and often uncharted terrain. Case vignettes derived from 2 years of this clinical research study are included.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995RK04900009

    View details for PubMedID 7589420

  • The therapeutic alliance in couples and family therapy: Theory in practice IN SESSION-PSYCHOTHERAPY IN PRACTICE RAIT, D. S. 1995; 1 (1): 59-72
  • Dimensions of work-family interface. Community Psychologist Cramton C, Rait D 1994; 27: 45-48
  • LIVES IN A BALANCE - PERCEIVED FAMILY FUNCTIONING AND THE PSYCHOSOCIAL ADJUSTMENT OF ADOLESCENT CANCER SURVIVORS FAMILY PROCESS RAIT, D. S., Ostroff, J. S., Smith, K., Cella, D. F., Tan, C., Lesko, L. M. 1992; 31 (4): 383-397

    Abstract

    Childhood cancer patients have a greater likelihood of long-term survival than ever before. This study examined both the perceived family functioning of adolescents who had successfully completed treatment for pediatric cancer and the relationship between family functioning and post-treatment adjustment. Eighty-eight adolescent survivors of hematologic malignancies were assessed regarding their family functioning, mental health, self-esteem, global competence, and problem behaviors. Contrary to expectations about the influence of cancer on these families, adolescent cancer survivors reported lower levels of family cohesion than the normative sample of healthy adolescents and their families. While current age, gender, age at diagnosis, and time since treatment completion were generally not associated with adolescents' adjustment, perceived family cohesion and adaptability were strongly related to post-treatment psychological adjustment.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992KG44800005

    View details for PubMedID 1289123

  • Family assessment in oncology settings. Cancer Nursing Feldstein M, Rait D 1992; 15: 161-172
  • The family context of AIDS. Psychiatric medicine RAIT, D. S. 1991; 9 (3): 423-439

    View details for PubMedID 1924830

  • Informed consent in the electroconvulsive treatment of geriatric patients. The Bulletin of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law Levine, S. B., Blank, K., Schwartz, H. I., RAIT, D. S. 1991; 19 (4): 395-403

    Abstract

    The past 15 years have been marked by an increasingly stringent regulatory atmosphere regarding the administration of ECT, leading to delays in treatment and declines in usage. Regulatory changes requiring judicial intervention in clinical decisions are driven by the notion that only the courts can provide adequate due process protections when legal rights and clinical need conflict. We retrospectively reviewed the documentation of the informed consent process for 62 geriatric patients receiving ECT to assess the degree to which clinicians conformed to the spirit of the informed consent doctrine in a state that allows significant clinical discretion in decisions to administer ECT to patients lacking decisional capacity. In the eight cases in which the patient's decisional capacity was questioned, we found appropriate documentation of the patient's failure to comprehend his condition or the proposed treatment, evidence of a high degree of family involvement in decision making, and extensive use of outside consultants to document decisional incapacity and the need for treatment. Evidence of family participation in decision making was present for a high percentage of cases in which decisional capacity was unquestioned. Our review demonstrated high compliance with the procedural safeguards contained in the state regulation and with the spirit of the informed consent doctrine.

    View details for PubMedID 1786419

  • A FAMILY - SYSTEMS-APPROACH TO THE PATIENT WITH CANCER CANCER INVESTIGATION RAIT, D. S. 1989; 7 (1): 77-81

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989AD32500008

    View details for PubMedID 2736406

  • The family of the patient with cancer In Holland, J.C. & Rowland, J. (Eds.). Psychological Care of the Patient with Cancer: Handbook of Psycho-oncology. New York: Oxford Press. Rait, D., Lederberg, M. 1989: 585-597
  • CHARACTERISTICS OF PSYCHIATRIC CONSULTATIONS IN A PEDIATRIC CANCER CENTER AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY RAIT, D. S., Jacobsen, P. B., Lederberg, M. S., Holland, J. C. 1988; 145 (3): 363-364

    Abstract

    Data on psychiatric consultations with 58 pediatric cancer patients are summarized. Although most patients received DSM-III axis I diagnoses, adjustment disorder was diagnosed in 30 cases (52%). The patients with primarily depressive features were significantly older than those with anxious features.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988M329100018

    View details for PubMedID 3344854

  • Family therapy practice survey. Family Therapy Networker Rait D 1988; 1: 52-56
  • Stress reactions in adolescent cancer patients. Leukemia Rait D, Smith K, Cella D, Lesko L 1988; 2: 194
  • Pediatric cancer: Psychosocial issues and approaches. Mediguide to Oncology Rait DS, Holland JC 1986; 6: 1-5

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