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  • The hydrogen games and other adventures in chemistry. Annual review of physical chemistry Zare, R. N. 2013; 64: 1-19

    Abstract

    I seem to have started off on the wrong foot in life, but I am extremely fortunate that I soon found my footing in the company of physical chemists. I consider myself to be very lucky to be doing something that constantly brings me in contact with bright minds, stimulating conversations, and exciting experiments. My work has allowed me to learn astounding facts about the molecules and atoms that make up our surroundings and ourselves. For this article, I focus on one aspect of my research, understanding the fundamental principles of the simple reaction between a hydrogen atom and a hydrogen molecule. Although my group and others have been studying this seemingly simple reaction for well over 30 years, it continues to provoke questions about the properties of matter.

    View details for DOI 10.1146/annurev-physchem-040412-110115

    View details for PubMedID 22974411

  • Seemingly Anomalous Angular Distributions in H+D-2 Reactive Scattering SCIENCE Jankunas, J., Zare, R. N., Bouakline, F., Althorpe, S. C., Herraez-Aguilar, D., Aoiz, F. J. 2012; 336 (6089): 1687-1690

    Abstract

    When a hydrogen (H) atom approaches a deuterium (D(2)) molecule, the minimum-energy path is for the three nuclei to line up. Consequently, nearly collinear collisions cause HD reaction products to be backscattered with low rotational excitation, whereas more glancing collisions yield sideways-scattered HD products with higher rotational excitation. Here we report that measured cross sections for the H + D(2) → HD(v' = 4, j') + D reaction at a collision energy of 1.97 electron volts contradict this behavior. The anomalous angular distributions match closely fully quantum mechanical calculations, and for the most part quasiclassical trajectory calculations. As the energy available in product recoil is reduced, a rotational barrier to reaction cuts off contributions from glancing collisions, causing high-j' HD products to become backward scattered.

    View details for DOI 10.1126/science.1221329

    View details for Web of Science ID 000305794500045

    View details for PubMedID 22745425

  • Microfluidic capture and release of bacteria in a conical nanopore array LAB ON A CHIP Guo, P., Hall, E. W., Schirhagl, R., Mukaibo, H., Martin, C. R., Zare, R. N. 2012; 12 (3): 558-561

    Abstract

    We present a simple and inexpensive method for the capture and release of bacteria contained in an array of conical nanopores on a membrane inside a microfluidic device. As an example, we demonstrate that cyanobacteria can be captured, one bacterium per pore, in a defined orientation with over 500 bacteria per membrane with viabilities as high as 100%. The device can also specifically capture cyanobacteria from a mixed suspension of cyanobacteria and chlamydomonas with a selectivity as high as 90%.

    View details for DOI 10.1039/c2lc21092d

    View details for Web of Science ID 000298964300015

    View details for PubMedID 22170441

  • Separation of bacteria with imprinted polymeric films ANALYST Schirhagl, R., Hall, E. W., Fuereder, I., Zare, R. N. 2012; 137 (6): 1495-1499

    Abstract

    Separation of compounds out of complex mixtures is a key issue that has been solved for small molecules by chromatography. However, general methods for the separation of large bio-particles, such as cells, are still challenging. We demonstrate integration of imprinted polymeric films (IPF) into a microfluidic chip, which preferentially capture cells matching an imprint template, and separate strains of cyanobacteria with 80-90% efficiency, despite a minimal difference in morphology and fluorescence, demonstrating its general nature. It is currently thought that the imprinting process, conducted while the polymer cures, transfers chemical information of the cell's external structure to the substrate. Capture specificity and separation can be further enhanced by orienting the imprints parallel to the flow vector and tuning the pH to a lower range.

    View details for DOI 10.1039/c2an15927a

    View details for Web of Science ID 000300510900030

    View details for PubMedID 22324051

  • Can stimulated Raman pumping cause large population transfers in isolated molecules? JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Mukherjee, N., Zare, R. N. 2011; 135 (18)

    Abstract

    When stimulated Raman pumping (SRP) is applied to a stream of isolated molecules, such as found in a supersonic molecular beam expansion, we show that SRP can neither saturate nor power broaden a molecular transition connecting two metastable levels that is resonant with the energy difference between the pump and Stokes laser pulses. Using the optical Bloch-Feynman equations, we discuss the pumping of the hydrogen molecule from H(2) (v = 0, J = 0, M = 0) to H(2) (v = 1, J = 2, M = 0) as an illustration of how coherent population return severely reduces the SRP pumping efficiency unless the pump and Stokes laser pulses are applied with an appropriate relative delay and ratio of intensities.

    View details for DOI 10.1063/1.3657832

    View details for Web of Science ID 000297472800016

    View details for PubMedID 22088058

  • False estimates of stimulated Raman pumping efficiency caused by the optical Stark effect JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Bartlett, N. M., Jankunas, J., Zare, R. N. 2011; 134 (23)

    Abstract

    One technique for measuring the fraction of molecules pumped to the excited state in stimulated Raman pumping (SRP) is to record the depletion of molecules in the lower state by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The presence of electric fields on the order of 10(7) V/cm arising from the pulsed SRP laser beams is sufficient to shift the line position of the REMPI transition to such an extent that the estimate of the pumping efficiency is overestimated unless this shift is accounted for.

    View details for DOI 10.1063/1.3601923

    View details for Web of Science ID 000291992500019

    View details for PubMedID 21702559

  • Particle sorting using a porous membrane in a microfluidic device LAB ON A CHIP Wei, H., Chueh, B., Wu, H., Hall, E. W., Li, C., Schirhagl, R., Lin, J., Zare, R. N. 2011; 11 (2): 238-245

    Abstract

    Porous membranes have been fabricated based on the development of the perforated membrane mold [Y. Luo and R. N. Zare, Lab Chip, 2008, 8, 1688-1694] to create a single filter that contains multiple pore sizes ranging from 6.4 to 16.6 µm inside a monolithic three-dimensional poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic structure. By overlapping two filters we are able to achieve smaller pore size openings (2.5 to 3.3 µm). This filter operates without any detectable irreversible clogging, which is achieved using a cross-flow placed in front of each filtration section. The utility of a particle-sorting device that contains this filter is demonstrated by separating polystyrene beads of different diameters with an efficiency greater than 99.9%. Additionally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this particle-sorting device by separating whole blood samples into white blood cells and red blood cells with platelets.

    View details for DOI 10.1039/c0lc00121j

    View details for Web of Science ID 000285514700007

    View details for PubMedID 21057685

  • Detecting Reaction Intermediates in Liquids on the Millisecond Time Scale Using Desorption Electrospray Ionization ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION Perry, R. H., Splendore, M., Chien, A., Davis, N. K., Zare, R. N. 2011; 50 (1): 250-254

    View details for DOI 10.1002/anie.201004861

    View details for Web of Science ID 000285891900019

    View details for PubMedID 21110361

  • Stopped-Flow Kinetic Analysis Using Hadamard Transform Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Robbins, M. D., Yoon, O. K., Barbula, G. K., Zare, R. N. 2010; 82 (20): 8650-8657

    Abstract

    A home-built stopped-flow apparatus is interfaced to a Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometer, which permits study of reaction kinetics with a time between reaction initiation and observation as short as about 100 ms and a sampling rate of chemical change that can approach 1 ms. This technique is applied to the trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of several peptides and is validated by comparing the results with literature values as well as to optical data obtained with the present stopped-flow apparatus. In addition, we report a kinetic study of the action of trypsin on a peptide having more than one cleavage site.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/ac101899n

    View details for Web of Science ID 000282859100040

    View details for PubMedID 20843011

  • Perforated membrane method for fabricating three-dimensional polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic devices LAB ON A CHIP Luo, Y., Zare, R. N. 2008; 8 (10): 1688-1694

    Abstract

    A procedure is described for making layer-to-layer interconnections in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices. Thin (approximately 50 microm) perforated PDMS membranes are bonded to thicker (0.1 cm or more) PDMS slabs by means of thermally cured PDMS prepolymer to form a three-dimensional (3D) channel structure, which may contain channel or valve arrays that can pass over and under one another. Devices containing as many as two slabs and three perforated membranes are demonstrated. We also present 3D PDMS microfluidic devices for display and for liquid dispensing.

    View details for DOI 10.1039/b807751g

    View details for Web of Science ID 000260466300013

    View details for PubMedID 18813392

  • Computer-controlled, variable-frequency power supply for driving multipole ion guides REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS Robbins, M. D., Yoon, O. K., Zuleta, I., Barbula, G. K., Zare, R. N. 2008; 79 (3)

    Abstract

    A high voltage, variable-frequency driver circuit for powering resonant multipole ion guides is presented. Two key features of this design are (1) the use of integrated circuits in the driver stage and (2) the use a stepper motor for tuning a large variable capacitor in the resonant stage. In the present configuration the available frequency range spans a factor of 2. The actual values of the minimum and maximum frequencies depend on the chosen inductor and the capacitance of the ion guide. Feedback allows for stabilized, computer-adjustable rf amplitudes over the range of 5-500 V. The rf power supply was characterized over the range of 350-750 kHz and evaluated by driving a quadrupole ion guide in an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    View details for DOI 10.1063/1.2884148

    View details for Web of Science ID 000254538100047

    View details for PubMedID 18377035

  • Micromachined Bradbury-Nielsen gates ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Zuleta, I. A., Barbula, G. K., Robbins, M. D., Yoon, O. K., Zare, R. M. 2007; 79 (23): 9160-9165

    Abstract

    Bradbury-Nielsen gates (BNGs) are a standard way for gating or steering beams of charged particles in ion mobility spectrometry and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. They consist of a pair of interleaved electrodes that when at the same potential allow ions to pass through the electrodes undeflected and, when a voltage is applied, cause the ions to be deflected from their propagation axis. Previous efforts to construct such devices have relied on mechanical assembly by winding wires across an aperture. We describe a micromachining method for making monolithic BNGs using deep reactive ion etching of silicon-on-insulator wafers. This method enables the creation of electrodes with spacings ranging from 25 to 100 microm with a thickness of 20 microm, covering a 5 mm by 5 mm active area. We characterize the performance of these micromachined BNGs by ion imaging in a pseudorandom time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/ac071581e

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251311900049

    View details for PubMedID 17966990

  • Visible light-induced photopolymerization of an in situ macroporous sol-gel monolith JOURNAL OF SEPARATION SCIENCE Dulay, M. T., Choi, H. N., Zare, R. N. 2007; 30 (17): 2979-2985

    Abstract

    A one-step, in situ, photopolymerization of a mixture of methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane in the presence of an acid catalyst, water, and toluene is accomplished in a 75 microm id polyimide-coated capillary using visible light (460 nm) for a 15 min irradiation time. The mixture is a two-component photosystem comprising Irgacure 784 photosensitizer and diphenyliodonium chloride photoinitiator. The visible photopolymerized sol-gel (vis-PSG) column shows RP chromatographic behavior. The analytical potential of these columns is demonstrated with the isocratic separation of small, neutral alkyl phenyl ketones. Operational parameters, such as mobile phase composition, field strength, and column temperature were varied to assess how they affect the separation performance of the monolith.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/jssc.200700328

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251461500024

    View details for PubMedID 17960846

  • Simple template-based method to produce Bradbury-Nielsen gates JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR MASS SPECTROMETRY Yoon, O. K., Zuleta, I. A., Robbins, M. D., Barbula, G. K., Zare, R. N. 2007; 18 (11): 1901-1908

    Abstract

    A Bradbury-Nielsen gate (BNG) consists of two interleaved and electrically isolated sets of wires and can transmit or deflect charged particles by applying a varying voltage difference across the two wire sets. We present a simple template-based method to fabricate BNGs with wire spacings as small as 50 microm with minimal use of a microscope. The small wire spacing allows modulation rates at tens of megahertz. Using this method, we have fabricated four BNGs with wire spacings of 500, 200, 100, and 50 microm using 10 microm gold-coated tungsten wires. The performance of the four BNGs is characterized using an imaging detector and compared with theoretical predictions.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jasms.2007.07.030

    View details for Web of Science ID 000250844900001

    View details for PubMedID 17827033

  • Detection of separated analytes in subnanoliter volumes using coaxial thermal lensing ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Li, F., Kachanov, A. A., Zare, R. N. 2007; 79 (14): 5264-5271

    Abstract

    A collinear-beam thermal lens detector has been constructed and its properties were characterized. Its application to the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation of a mixture of five anthraquinone dyes dissolved in water shows a linear response over 3.5 orders of magnitude and a detection limit that is subnanomolar in the dye concentrations. These results are compared with those obtained previously using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) in a Brewster's angle flow cell (Bechtel, K. L.; Zare, R. N.; Kachanov, A. A.; Sanders, S. S.; Paldus, B. A. Anal. Chem. 2005, 77, 1177-1182). The peak-to-peak baseline noise of the thermal lensing detection is 3.5 x 10(-8) absorbance units (AU) with a path length of 200 microm, whereas the peak-to-peak baseline noise of CRDS detection is approximately 2 x 10(-7) AU with a path length of 300 microm. Both of these figures of merit should be compared to the peak-to-peak baseline noise of one of the best commercial UV-vis HPLC detection systems, which is approximately 5 x 10(-6) AU with a path length of 10 mm (1-s integration time). Therefore, the thermal lensing technique has a demonstrated sensitivity of subnanomolar detection that is approximately 140 times better than that of the best commercial UV-vis detector and approximately 5 times better than that of CRDS.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/ac0705925

    View details for Web of Science ID 000247992600021

    View details for PubMedID 17569503

  • Surface plasmon resonance imaging using a high numerical aperture microscope objective ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Huang, B., Yu, F., Zare, R. N. 2007; 79 (7): 2979-2983

    Abstract

    We designed, constructed, and tested a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microscope using a high numerical aperture objective from a commercially available inverted optical microscope. Such a configuration, combined with various methods to shorten the surface plasmon propagation length, achieves diffraction-limited spatial resolution in the transverse direction and near-diffraction-limited resolution in the longitudinal direction. A virtue of the objective-type SPR imaging is that we achieve distortion-free angle-resolved SPR imaging, allowing the angle-dependent reflectivity of the sample to be examined on a pixel-by-pixel basis, thus offering high-resolution information about surface properties.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/ac062284x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000245304300046

    View details for PubMedID 17309232

  • Doppler-free ion imaging of hydrogen molecules produced in bimolecular reactions CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS Goldberg, N. T., Koszinowski, K., Pomerantz, A. E., Zare, R. N. 2007; 433 (4-6): 439-443
  • Microfluidic separation and capture of analytes for single-molecule spectroscopy LAB ON A CHIP Kim, S., Huang, B., Zare, R. N. 2007; 7 (12): 1663-1665

    Abstract

    A complex mixture of fluorescently labeled biological molecules is separated electrophoretically on a chip and the constituent molecules are confined in a sub-nanolitre microchamber, which allows analysis by various single-molecule techniques.

    View details for DOI 10.1039/b713103h

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251121000013

    View details for PubMedID 18030384

  • Controlling electroosmotic flow in poly(dimethylsiloxane) separation channels by means of prepolymer additives ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Luo, Y., Huang, B., Wu, H., Zare, R. N. 2006; 78 (13): 4588-4592

    Abstract

    The electroosmotic flow (EOF) in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) separation channel can be altered and controlled by adding a carboxylic acid to the prepolymer prior to curing. When the prepolymer is doped with 0.5 wt % undecylenic acid (UDA), the electroosmotic mobility in a modified PDMS channel rises to (7.6 +/- 0.2) x 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) (in HEPES buffer at pH 8.5), which is nearly twice that in the native PDMS channel. Because this modification does not significantly change the hydrophobicity of the PDMS surface, it is possible to combine the modified PDMS with a dynamic coating of n-dodecyl beta-d-maltoside (DDM), which prevents protein sticking (see Huang, B.; Wu, H. K.; Kim, S.; Zare, R. N. Lab Chip 2005, 5, 1005-1007). The modified PDMS channel with a dynamic coating of DDM generates an electroosmotic mobility of (5.01 +/- 0.09) x 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), which shows excellent reproducibility both in successive runs and during storage in water. Combining this surface modification and the dynamic coating of DDM is an effective means for both providing stable EOF in the PDMS channels and preventing protein adsorption on the channel walls. To demonstrate these effects, we show that the electrophoretic separation of immunocomplexes in free solution can be readily accomplished in a microfluidic chip made of UDA-doped (0.5 wt %) PDMS with a dynamic coating of DDM.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/ac052274g

    View details for Web of Science ID 000238665200047

    View details for PubMedID 16808469

  • Perspective - Sex, lies, and Title IX CHEMICAL & ENGINEERING NEWS Zare, R. N. 2006; 84 (20): 46-?
  • Phospholipid biotinylation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) for protein immobilization LAB ON A CHIP Huang, B., Wu, H. K., Kim, S., Kobilka, B. K., Zare, R. N. 2006; 6 (3): 369-373

    Abstract

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces can be functionalized with biotin groups by adding biotinylated phospholipids to the PDMS prepolymer before curing. The addition of beta-D-dodecyl-N-maltoside (DDM) in the solution blocks non-specific protein binding on these functionalized PDMS surfaces. We characterize the surface by measuring fluorescently labeled streptavidin binding. Single molecule tracking shows that the phospholipids are not covalently linked to PDMS polymer chains, but the surface functionalization is not removed by washing. We demonstrate the immobilization of biotinylated antibodies and lectins through biotin-avidin interactions.

    View details for DOI 10.1039/b515840k

    View details for Web of Science ID 000235993800005

    View details for PubMedID 16511619

  • Reaction products with internal energy beyond the kinematic limit result from trajectories far from the minimum energy path: An example from H+HBr -> H-2+Br JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY Pomerantz, A. E., Camden, J. P., Chiou, A. S., Ausfelder, F., Chawla, N., Hase, W. L., Zare, R. N. 2005; 127 (47): 16368-16369

    Abstract

    The importance of reactive trajectories straying far from the minimum energy path is demonstrated for the bimolecular reaction H + HBr --> H2(v', j') + Br at 53 kcal/mol collision energy. Product quantum state distributions are measured and calculated using the quasi-classical trajectory technique, and the calculations indicate that highly internally excited H2 products result from indirect reactive trajectories with bent transition states. A general argument is made suggesting that reaction products with internal energy exceeding a kinematic constraint can, in general, be attributed to reactive collisions straying far from the minimum energy path.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/ja055440a

    View details for Web of Science ID 000233617900014

    View details for PubMedID 16305203

  • Undulatory delamination of thin polymer films on gold surfaces JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B Chah, S., Noolandi, J., Zare, R. N. 2005; 109 (41): 19416-19421

    Abstract

    Using two-dimensional surface plasmon resonance measurements, we have observed the formation of traveling waves in the delamination of thin films of polydimethylsilane (PDMS) exposed to methanol. Films were spin-coated on a gold surface and the methanol was added to the top surface. The stress-induced instability caused by the swelling of the PDMS thin film when its edge is pinned to the gold surface leads to wrinkle formation and propagation at the interface. The periodic pattern is thought to be the result of an Asaro-Tiller-Grinfeld (ATG) instability.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/jp0535644

    View details for Web of Science ID 000232612100056

    View details for PubMedID 16853508

  • Effects of C-H stretch excitation on the H+CH4 reaction JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Camden, J. P., Bechtel, H. A., Brown, D. J., Zare, R. N. 2005; 123 (13)

    Abstract

    We have investigated the effects of C-H stretching excitation on the H+CH4-->CH3+H2 reaction dynamics using the photo-LOC technique. The CH3 product vibrational state and angular distribution are measured for the reaction of fast H atoms with methane excited in either the antisymmetric stretching fundamental (nu3=1) or first overtone (nu3=2) with a center-of-mass collision energy of Ecoll ranging from 1.52 to 2.20 eV. We find that vibrational excitation of the nu3=1 mode enhances the overall reaction cross section by a factor of 3.0+/-1.5 for Ecoll=1.52 eV, and this enhancement factor is approximately constant over the 1.52-2.20-eV collision energy range. A local-mode description of the CH4 stretching vibration, in which the C-H oscillators are uncoupled, is used to describe the observed state distributions. In this model, the interaction of the incident H atom with either a stretched or an unstretched C-H oscillator determines the vibrational state of the CH3 product. We also compare these results to the similar quantities obtained previously for the Cl+CH4-->CH3+HCl reaction at Ecoll=0.16 eV [Z. H. Kim, H. A. Bechtel, and R. N. Zare, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 3232 (2002); H. A. Bechtel, J. P. Camden, D. J. A. Brown, and R. N. Zare, ibid. 120, 5096 (2004)] in an attempt to elucidate the differences in reactivity for the same initially prepared vibration.

    View details for DOI 10.1063/1.2034507

    View details for Web of Science ID 000232442500016

    View details for PubMedID 16223282

  • A reinterpretation of the mechanism of the simplest reaction at an spa-hybridized carbon atom: H+CD4 -> CD3+HD JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY Camden, J. P., Bechtel, H. A., Brown, D. J., Martin, M. R., Zare, R. N., Hu, W. F., Lendvay, G., Troya, D., Schatz, G. C. 2005; 127 (34): 11898-11899

    Abstract

    A comparison between theory and experiment for the benchmark H + CD4 --> HD + CD3 abstraction reaction yields a reinterpretation of the reaction mechanism and highlights the unexpected contribution of a stripping mechanism. Whereas the best analytic surface fails to reproduce experiment, a first-principles direct-dynamics (on the fly) treatment is in good agreement, showing that the H + CD4 reaction exhibits extreme sensitivity to modest differences in the potential energy surface. We find that bent H-D-C transition state geometries play an important role in the dynamics. A simple model that relates the scattering angle impact parameter and cone of acceptance accounts well for the overall reaction dynamics.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/ja052684m

    View details for Web of Science ID 000231605900010

    View details for PubMedID 16117502

  • Collision-energy dependence of HD(nu(')=1,j ') product rotational distributions for the H+D-2 reaction JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Koszinowski, K., Goldberg, N. T., Pomerantz, A. E., Zare, R. N., Juanes-Marcos, J. C., Althorpe, S. C. 2005; 123 (5)

    Abstract

    Product rotational distributions for the reaction H + D2 --> HD(nu'=1,j') + D have been measured for 16 collision energies in the range of 1.43 < or = E(coll) < or = 2.55 eV. Time-dependent quantum-mechanical calculations agree well in general with the experimental results, but they consistently yield slightly colder distributions. In terms of the average energy channeled into rotation, the differences between experiment and theory amount to approximately 10% for all collision energies sampled. No peculiarity is found for E(coll)=2.55 eV at which the system has sufficient energy to access the first HD2 electronically excited state.

    View details for DOI 10.1063/1.1978871

    View details for Web of Science ID 000231168700022

    View details for PubMedID 16108638

  • Extracts of impact breccia samples from Sudbury, Gardnos, and Ries impact craters and the effects of aggregation on C-60 detection GEOCHIMICA ET COSMOCHIMICA ACTA Elsila, J. E., de Leon, N. P., Plows, F. L., Buseck, P. R., Zare, R. N. 2005; 69 (11): 2891-2899
  • Gold nanoparticles as a colorimetric sensor for protein conformational changes CHEMISTRY & BIOLOGY Chah, S., Hammond, M. R., Zare, R. N. 2005; 12 (3): 323-328

    Abstract

    Spherical gold nanoparticles and flat gold films are prepared in which yeast iso-1-cytochrome c (Cyt c) is covalently bound to the gold surface by a thiol group in the cystein 102 residue. Upon exposure to solutions of different pH, bound Cyt c unfolds at low pH and refolds at high pH. This conformational change causes measurable shifts in the color of the coated nanoparticle solutions detected by UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy and in the refractive index (RI) of the flat gold films detected by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. Both experiments demonstrate the same trend with pH, suggesting the use of protein-covered gold nanoparticles as a simple colorimetric sensor for conformational change.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.chembiol.2005.01.013

    View details for Web of Science ID 000228260000011

    View details for PubMedID 15797216

  • Alkylation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in carbonaceous chondrites GEOCHIMICA ET COSMOCHIMICA ACTA Elsila, J. E., de Leon, N. P., Buseck, P. R., Zare, R. N. 2005; 69 (5): 1349-1357
  • Moving beyond traditional UV-visible absorption detection: Cavity ring-down spectroscopy for HPLC ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Bechtel, K. L., Zare, R. N., Kachanov, A. A., Sanders, S. S., Paldus, B. A. 2005; 77 (4): 1177-1182

    Abstract

    We describe the use of liquid-phase continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy for the detection of an HPLC separation. This technique builds on earlier work by Snyder and Zare using pulsed laser sources and improves upon commercially available UV-visible detectors by a factor of up to 50. The system employs a compact doubled-diode single-mode continuous-wave laser operating at 488 nm and a previously described Brewster's-angle flow cell. Ring-down time constants as long as 5.8 micros were observed with liquid samples in a 0.3-mm path length cell. The baseline noise during an HPLC separation was only 2 x 10(-7) absorbance units (AU) peak to peak, as compared to 1 x 10(-5) AU for a state-of-the-art commercial UV-visible detector.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/ac048444r

    View details for Web of Science ID 000227111200031

    View details for PubMedID 15859003

  • Inductive behavior of electrolytes in AC conductance measurements CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS Bardos, A., Zare, R. N., Markides, K. 2005; 402 (1-3): 274-278
  • Effects of bending excitation on the reaction of chlorine atoms with methane ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION Bechtel, H. A., Camden, J. P., Brown, D. J., Martin, M. R., Zare, R. N., Vodopyanov, K. 2005; 44 (16): 2382-2385

    View details for DOI 10.1002/anie.200462837

    View details for Web of Science ID 000228709200016

    View details for PubMedID 15765488

  • Coating of poly(dimethylsiloxane) with n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside to minimize nonspecific protein adsorption LAB ON A CHIP Huang, B., Wu, H. K., Kim, S., Zare, R. N. 2005; 5 (10): 1005-1007

    Abstract

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane)(PDMS) surface is coated with n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside, which reduces the nonspecifically adsorbed protein on the PDMS surface to the single molecule level.

    View details for DOI 10.1039/b509251e

    View details for Web of Science ID 000232003200001

    View details for PubMedID 16175253

  • Photon counting histogram: One-photon excitation CHEMPHYSCHEM Huang, B., Perroud, T. D., Zare, R. N. 2004; 5 (10): 1523-1531

    Abstract

    The photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis is a fluorescence fluctuation method that is able to characterize the brightness and concentration of different fluorescent species present in a liquid sample. We find that the PCH model using a three-dimensional Gaussian observation volume profile is inadequate for fitting experimental data obtained from a confocal setup with one-photon excitation. We propose an imoroved model, which is based on the correction to the observation volume profile for the out-of-focus emission. We demonstrate that this model is able to resolve different species present under a wide range of conditions. Attention is given to how this model allows the examination of the effects of different instrumental setups on the resolvability.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/cphc.200400176

    View details for Web of Science ID 000224692100008

    View details for PubMedID 15535551

  • Rovibrational product state distribution for inelastic H+D-2 collisions JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Pomerantz, A. E., Ausfelder, F., Zare, R. N., Juanes-Marcos, J. C., Althorpe, S. C., Rabanos, V. S., Aoiz, F. J., Banares, L., Castillo, J. F. 2004; 121 (14): 6587-6590

    Abstract

    Experimental measurements of rovibrational product state distributions for the inelastic scattering process H + D2(nu=0,j)-->H + D2(nu' = 1,2,j') are presented and compared with the results of quasiclassical and quantum mechanical calculations. Agreement between theory and experiment is almost quantitative. Two subtle trends are found: the relative amount of energy in product rotational excitation decreases slightly with increasing collision energy and increases slightly with increasing product vibrational excitation. These trends are the reverse of what has been found for reactive scattering in which the opposite trends are much more pronounced.

    View details for DOI 10.1063/1.1804940

    View details for Web of Science ID 000224269200001

    View details for PubMedID 15473712

  • Line strength factors for E,F-1 Sigma(+)(g)(v '=0, J '=J '')-X-1 Sigma(+)(g) (v '', J '') (2+1) REMPI transitions in molecular hydrogen CANADIAN JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE CHIMIE Pomerantz, A. E., Ausfelder, F., Zare, R. N., Huo, W. M. 2004; 82 (6): 723-729

    View details for DOI 10.1139/V04-074

    View details for Web of Science ID 000224450700007

  • Surface plasmon resonance analysis of aqueous mercuric ions SENSORS AND ACTUATORS B-CHEMICAL Chah, S., Yi, J. H., Zare, R. N. 2004; 99 (2-3): 216-222
  • Electroosmotic flow in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) channel does not depend on percent curing agent ELECTROPHORESIS Wheeler, A. R., Trapp, G., Trapp, O., Zare, R. N. 2004; 25 (7-8): 1120-1124

    Abstract

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices were prepared from different ratios of "curing agent" (which contains silicon hydride groups) to "base" (which contains vinyl-terminated noncross-linked PDMS), to determine the effect of this ratio on electroosmotic flow (EOF). In fabricating devices for this purpose, a novel method for permanently enclosing PDMS channels was developed. As a supplement to the microfluidic method, the inner walls of capillaries were coated with PDMS formed from varying ratios of curing agent to base. EOF was found to be constant for PDMS formed with each ratio, which implies that the negative surface charges do not arise from chemical species present only in the base or the curing agent.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/elps.200305784

    View details for Web of Science ID 000221168700024

    View details for PubMedID 15095455

  • Poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic flow cells for surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy SENSORS AND ACTUATORS B-CHEMICAL Wheeler, A. R., Chah, S., Whelan, R. J., Zare, R. N. 2004; 98 (2-3): 208-214
  • Collision energy dependence of the HD(nu(')=2) product rotational distribution of the H+D-2 reaction in the range 1.30-1.89 eV JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Ausfelder, F., Pomerantz, A. E., Zare, R. N., Althorpe, S. C., Aoiz, F. J., Banares, L., Castillo, J. F. 2004; 120 (7): 3255-3264

    Abstract

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the collision energy dependence of the HD(nu' = 2,j') rotational product state distribution for the H + D2 reaction in the collision energy range of Ecol = 1.30-1.89 eV has been carried out. Theoretical results based on time-dependent and time-independent quantum mechanical methods agree nearly perfectly with each other, and the agreement with the experiment is good at low collision energies and very good at high collision energies. This behavior is in marked contrast to a previous report on the HD(nu' = 3,j') product state rotational distribution [Pomerantz et al., J. Chem. Phys. 120, 3244 (2004)] where a systematic difference between experiment and theory was observed, especially at the highest collision energies. The reason for this different behavior is not yet understood. In addition, this study employs Doppler-free spectroscopy to resolve an ambiguity in the E, F-X resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization transition originating from the HD(nu' = 2,j' = 1) state, which is found to be caused by an accidental blending with the transition coming from the HD(nu' = 1,j' = 14) state.

    View details for DOI 10.1063/1.1641009

    View details for Web of Science ID 000188880900025

    View details for PubMedID 15268479

  • Disagreement between theory and experiment in the simplest chemical reaction: Collision energy dependent rotational distributions for H+D-2 -> HD(nu(')=3,j('))+D JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Pomerantz, A. E., Ausfelder, F., Zare, R. N., Althorpe, S. C., Aoiz, F. J., Banares, L., Castillo, J. F. 2004; 120 (7): 3244-3254

    Abstract

    We present experimental rotational distributions for the reaction H + D2 --> HD(nu' = 3,j') + D at eight different collision energies between 1.49 and 1.85 eV. We combine a previous measurement of the state-resolved excitation function for this reaction [Ayers et al., J. Chem. Phys. 119, 4662 (2003)] with the current data to produce a map of the relative reactive cross section as a function of both collision energy and rotational quantum number (an E-j' plot). To compare with the experimental data, we also present E-j' plots resulting from both time-dependent and time-independent quantum mechanical calculations carried out on the BKMP2 surface. The two calculations agree well with each other, but they produce rotational distributions significantly colder than the experiment, with the difference being more pronounced at higher collision energies. Disagreement between theory and experiment might be regarded as surprising considering the simplicity of this system; potential causes of this discrepancy are discussed.

    View details for DOI 10.1063/1.1641008

    View details for Web of Science ID 000188880900024

    View details for PubMedID 15268478

  • Design and characterization of a late-mixing pulsed nozzle REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS Camden, J. P., Bechtel, H. A., Zare, R. N. 2004; 75 (2): 556-558

    View details for DOI 10.1063/1.1641158

    View details for Web of Science ID 000188532400043

  • Continuous two-channel time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection of electrosprayed ions ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION Trapp, O., Kimmel, J. R., Yoon, O. K., Zuleta, I. A., Fernandez, F. M., Zare, R. N. 2004; 43 (47): 6541-6544

    View details for DOI 10.1002/anie.200461240

    View details for Web of Science ID 000225718700026

    View details for PubMedID 15578763

  • Photon counting histogram for one-photon excitation CHEMPHYSCHEM Perroud, T. D., Huang, B., Wallace, M. I., Zare, R. N. 2003; 4 (10): 1121-1123

    View details for DOI 10.1002/cphc.200300824

    View details for Web of Science ID 000186151200016

    View details for PubMedID 14596014

  • Measurement of the cross section for H+D-2 -> HD(v(')=3,j '=0)+D as a function of angle and energy JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Ayers, J. D., Pomerantz, A. E., Fernandez-Alonso, F., Ausfelder, F., Bean, B. D., Zare, R. N. 2003; 119 (9): 4662-4670

    View details for DOI 10.1063/1.1595092

    View details for Web of Science ID 000184775200007

  • Microfluidic device for single-cell analysis ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Wheeler, A. R., Throndset, W. R., Whelan, R. J., Leach, A. M., Zare, R. N., Liao, Y. H., Farrell, K., Manger, I. D., Daridon, A. 2003; 75 (14): 3581-3586

    Abstract

    We have developed a novel microfluidic device constructed from poly(dimethylsiloxane) using multilayer soft lithography technology for the analysis of single cells. The microfluidic network enables the passive and gentle separation of a single cell from the bulk cell suspension, and integrated valves and pumps enable the precise delivery of nanoliter volumes of reagents to that cell. Various applications are demonstrated, including cell viability assays, ionophore-mediated intracellular Ca2+ flux measurements, and multistep receptor-mediated Ca2+ measurements. These assays, and others, are achieved with significant improvements in reagent consumption, analysis time, and temporal resolution over macroscale alternatives.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/ac0340758

    View details for Web of Science ID 000184649500041

    View details for PubMedID 14570213

  • Evidence that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in two carbonaceous chondrites predate parent-body formation GEOCHIMICA ET COSMOCHIMICA ACTA Plows, F. L., Elsila, J. E., Zare, R. N., Buseck, P. R. 2003; 67 (7): 1429-1436
  • Surface plasmon resonance detection for capillary electrophoresis separations ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Whelan, R. J., Zare, R. N. 2003; 75 (6): 1542-1547

    Abstract

    A miniaturized surface plasmon resonance sensor has been used as an on-line detector for capillary electrophoresis separations. The capillary was modified slightly to shield the sensor electronics from the high voltages applied during the separation. A three-component mixture of high refractive index materials was separated and detected at the millimolar level by an untreated gold-sensing surface. A simple protein immobilization procedure was used to functionalize the surface for selective protein detection. A hybrid buffer system was developed, in which both the deposition of immobilized protein layers and the electrophoretic delivery of protein analytes were optimized. The detection system has a reproducibility of 15%, a dynamic range of 3 orders of magnitude, and a detection limit for IgG of 2 fmol.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/ac0263521

    View details for Web of Science ID 000181675900042

    View details for PubMedID 12659220

  • Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometry: A high-speed detector for capillary-format separations ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Fernandez, F. M., Vadillo, J. M., Kimmel, J. R., Wetterhall, M., Markides, K., Rodriguez, N., Zare, R. N. 2002; 74 (7): 1611-1617

    Abstract

    This work demonstrates that with an intrinsic duty cycle of 50% and spectral storage speeds up to 277 spectra s(-1) Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HT-TOFMS) is a promising detector for any capillary-format separation that can be coupled to MS by electrospray ionization. Complete resolution of the components of a nine-peptide standard was achieved by coupling pressurized-capillary electrophoresis (pCE) to HT-TOFMS. The addition of pressure to the separation capillary decreased analysis times and stabilized the electrospray ionization source. Pulsed-pressurized injection of reserpine was used to experimentally simulate narrower peaks than those obtained in the pCE. HT-TOFMS was able to sample peaks having widths in the millisecond range.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/ac015673u

    View details for Web of Science ID 000174841600031

    View details for PubMedID 12033252

  • Irradiation of dye-doped microspheres with a stronqly focused laser beam results in alignment upon optical trapping NANO LETTERS Sirnpson, G. J., Wohland, T., Zare, R. N. 2002; 2 (3): 207-210

    View details for DOI 10.1021/nl015632d

    View details for Web of Science ID 000174640900008

  • Forward scattering in the H+D-2 -> HD+D reaction: Comparison between experiment and theoretical predictions JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Fernandez-Alonso, F., Bean, B. D., Zare, R. N., Aoiz, F. J., Banares, L., Castillo, J. F. 2001; 115 (10): 4534-4545
  • Microprobe laser mass spectrometry studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distributions on harbor sediments and coals ISRAEL JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY Gillette, J. S., Ghosh, U., Mahajan, T. B., Zare, R. N., Luthy, R. G. 2001; 41 (2): 105-110
  • Spatial concentration and temperature distribution of CH radicals formed in a diamond thin-film hot-filament reactor CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS Lommatzsch, U., Wahl, E. H., Owano, T. G., Kruger, C. H., Zare, R. N. 2000; 320 (3-4): 339-344
  • Evidence for scattering resonances in the H+D-2 reaction ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION Fernandez-Alonso, F., Bean, B. D., Ayers, J. D., Pomerantz, A. E., Zare, R. N., Banares, L., Aoiz, F. J. 2000; 39 (15): 2748-2752
  • Direct observation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on geosorbents at the subparticle scale ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Gillette, J. S., Luthy, R. G., Clemett, S. J., Zare, R. N. 1999; 33 (8): 1185-1192
  • Pulse-stacked cavity ring-down spectroscopy REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS Crosson, E. R., Haar, P., Marcus, G. A., Schwettman, H. A., Paldus, B. A., Spence, T. G., Zare, R. N. 1999; 70 (1): 4-10
  • Laser control of chemical reactions SCIENCE Zare, R. N. 1998; 279 (5358): 1875-1879
  • Evaluating the evidence for past life on Mars - Response SCIENCE Clemett, S. J., Zare, R. N. 1996; 274 (5295): 2122-2123
  • Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with Fourier-transform-limited light pulses CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS Martin, J., Paldus, B. A., ZALICKI, P., Wahl, E. H., Owano, T. G., Harris, J. S., Kruger, C. H., Zare, R. N. 1996; 258 (1-2): 63-70
  • MEASUREMENT OF THE METHYL RADICAL CONCENTRATION PROFILE IN A HOT-FILAMENT REACTOR APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS ZALICKI, P., Ma, Y., Zare, R. N., Wahl, E. H., Owano, T. G., Kruger, C. H. 1995; 67 (1): 144-146
  • CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY FOR QUANTITATIVE ABSORPTION-MEASUREMENTS JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS ZALICKI, P., Zare, R. N. 1995; 102 (7): 2708-2717
  • PHOTOACOUSTIC MEASUREMENT OF ABSOLUTE OVERTONE CROSS-SECTIONS CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS Gutow, J. H., Davidsson, J., Zare, R. N. 1991; 185 (1-2): 120-124
  • THROUGH A BEER GLASS DARKLY PHYSICS TODAY SHAFER, N. E., Zare, R. N. 1991; 44 (10): 48-52
  • IMPROVED END-COLUMN CONDUCTIVITY DETECTOR FOR CAPILLARY ZONE ELECTROPHORESIS ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Huang, X. H., Zare, R. N. 1991; 63 (19): 2193-2196
  • SELECTION-RULES FOR THE PHOTOIONIZATION OF DIATOMIC-MOLECULES JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Xie, J. C., Zare, R. N. 1990; 93 (5): 3033-3038
  • DETECTION OF CONCEALED EXPLOSIVES SCIENCE Williams, E. R., Zare, R. N. 1990; 248 (4962): 1471-1472
  • EXPERIMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS IN RECORDING GAS-PHASE PHOTOACOUSTIC SPECTRA JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Davidsson, J., Gutow, J. H., Zare, R. N. 1990; 94 (10): 4069-4073
  • USE OF AN ON-COLUMN FRIT IN CAPILLARY ZONE ELECTROPHORESIS - SAMPLE COLLECTION ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Huang, X. H., Zare, R. N. 1990; 62 (5): 443-446
  • SIMPLE-MODEL FOR LAMBDA-DOUBLET PROPENSITIES IN BIMOLECULAR REACTIONS CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS Bronikowski, M. J., Zare, R. N. 1990; 166 (1): 5-10
  • ANALYSIS OF FACTORS CAUSING PEAK BROADENING IN CAPILLARY ZONE ELECTROPHORESIS JOURNAL OF CHROMATOGRAPHY Huang, X. H., Coleman, W. F., Zare, R. N. 1989; 480: 95-110
  • ROTATIONALLY STATE-SELECTED HBR+ - PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS Xie, J. C., Zare, R. N. 1989; 159 (5-6): 399-405
  • PHOTOFRAGMENT ANGULAR-DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ORIENTED SYMMETRIC-TOP PRECURSOR MOLECULES CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS Zare, R. N. 1989; 156 (1): 1-6
  • OVERTONE-INDUCED ISOMERIZATION OF ALLYL ISOCYANIDE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Segall, J., Zare, R. N. 1988; 89 (9): 5704-5714
  • CURRENT-MONITORING METHOD FOR MEASURING THE ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW-RATE IN CAPILLARY ZONE ELECTROPHORESIS ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Huang, X. H., Gordon, M. J., Zare, R. N. 1988; 60 (17): 1837-1838
  • BIAS IN QUANTITATIVE CAPILLARY ZONE ELECTROPHORESIS CAUSED BY ELECTROKINETIC SAMPLE INJECTION ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Huang, X. H., Gordon, M. J., Zare, R. N. 1988; 60 (4): 375-377
  • STERN,OTTO AND THE DOUBLE BANK SHOT ZEITSCHRIFT FUR PHYSIK D-ATOMS MOLECULES AND CLUSTERS Zare, R. N. 1988; 10 (2-3): 377-382
  • ON-COLUMN CONDUCTIVITY DETECTOR FOR CAPILLARY ZONE ELECTROPHORESIS ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Huang, X. H., PANG, T. K., Gordon, M. J., Zare, R. N. 1987; 59 (23): 2747-2749
  • DYNAMICS OF KINEMATICALLY CONSTRAINED BIMOLECULAR REACTIONS HAVING CONSTANT PRODUCT RECOIL ENERGY JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Noda, C., Zare, R. N. 1987; 86 (7): 3968-3977
  • PRODUCT STATE DISTRIBUTIONS FROM THE REACTION O(P-3) + HBR FARADAY DISCUSSIONS McKendrick, K. G., Rakestraw, D. J., Zare, R. N. 1987; 84: 39-52
  • ELECTROKINETIC RESOLUTION OF AMINO-ACID ENANTIOMERS WITH COPPER(II) ASPARTAME SUPPORT ELECTROLYTE ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY GOZEL, P., Gassmann, E., MICHELSEN, H., Zare, R. N. 1987; 59 (1): 44-49
  • APPLICATIONS OF LASER FLUOROMETRY TO MICROCOLUMN LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY ACS SYMPOSIUM SERIES McGuffin, V. L., Zare, R. N. 1986; 297: 120-136
  • THE INVERSION OF DIATOMIC SPECTRA TO ESTIMATES OF POPULATION PARAMETERS JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Prisant, M. G., Zare, R. N. 1985; 83 (11): 5458-5467
  • RECORDING OPTO-ACOUSTIC SPECTRA WITH AN ACOUSTOOPTIC DETECTION SYSTEM CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS Chuang, M. C., Zare, R. N. 1985; 115 (1): 47-50
  • LASER FLUORESCENCE DETECTION IN MICROCOLUMN LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY - APPLICATION TO DERIVATIZED CARBOXYLIC-ACIDS APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY McGuffin, V. L., Zare, R. N. 1985; 39 (5): 847-853
  • DETERMINATION OF THE EFFECTIVE ELECTRIC-DIPOLE MOMENTS OF SELECTED NO2A2B2 FINE-STRUCTURE LEVELS MOLECULAR PHYSICS Brucat, P. J., Zare, R. N. 1985; 55 (2): 277-285
  • DEPOLARIZATION OF OPTICALLY PREPARED MOLECULES BY 2 RANDOMLY ORIENTED SPINS MOLECULAR PHYSICS Altkorn, R., Zare, R. N., Greene, C. H. 1985; 55 (1): 1-9
  • A DIRECT INTERACTION-MODEL FOR CHEMI-LUMINESCENT REACTIONS JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Prisant, M. G., Rettner, C. T., Zare, R. N. 1984; 81 (6): 2699-2712
  • GENERATION OF COHERENT EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET AND VACUUM ULTRAVIOLET-RADIATION USING PULSED NOZZLES PROCEEDINGS OF THE SOCIETY OF PHOTO-OPTICAL INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERS Rettner, C. T., Marinero, E. E., Zare, R. N., Kung, A. H. 1984; 461: 45-52
  • PULSED FREE JETS - NOVEL NONLINEAR MEDIA FOR GENERATION OF VACUUM ULTRAVIOLET AND EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET-RADIATION JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Rettner, C. T., Marinero, E. E., Zare, R. N., Kung, A. H. 1984; 88 (20): 4459-4465
  • COLLISIONAL QUENCHING AND DEPOLARIZATION OF NO2 A2B2 STATE FLUORESCENCE AS STUDIED BY ZEEMAN QUANTUM BEAT SPECTROSCOPY JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Brucat, P. J., Zare, R. N. 1984; 81 (6): 2562-2570
  • H+D2 REACTION DYNAMICS - DETERMINATION OF THE PRODUCT STATE DISTRIBUTIONS AT A COLLISION ENERGY OF 1.3-EV JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Marinero, E. E., Rettner, C. T., Zare, R. N. 1984; 80 (9): 4142-4156
  • EFFECTS OF SATURATION ON LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE MEASUREMENTS OF POPULATION AND POLARIZATION ANNUAL REVIEW OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Altkorn, R., Zare, R. N. 1984; 35: 265-289
  • NO2A2B2 STATE PROPERTIES FROM ZEEMAN QUANTUM BEATS JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Brucat, P. J., Zare, R. N. 1983; 78 (1): 100-111
  • EXCITATION OF H-2 USING CONTINUOUSLY TUNABLE COHERENT XUV RADIATION (97.3-102.3 NM) CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS Marinero, E. E., Rettner, C. T., Zare, R. N., Kung, A. H. 1983; 95 (6): 486-491
  • XUV EXCITATION OF H-2 USING THE 3RD HARMONIC OF A FREQUENCY-DOUBLED DYE-LASER AIP CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS Rettner, C. T., Marinero, E. E., Zare, R. N., Kung, A. H. 1983: 345-348
  • THE E,F1-SIGMA-G+ DOUBLE-MINIMUM STATE OF HYDROGEN - 2-PHOTON EXCITATION OF INNER AND OUTER WELLS JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Marinero, E. E., Vasudev, R., Zare, R. N. 1983; 78 (2): 692-699
  • LASER OPTOGALVANIC STUDY OF HCO A STATE PREDISSOCIATION JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Vasudev, R., Zare, R. N. 1982; 76 (11): 5267-5270
  • EFFECT OF ATOMIC REAGENT APPROACH GEOMETRY ON REACTIVITY - REACTIONS OF ALIGNED CA(P-1(1)) WITH HCL, CL2, AND CCL4 JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Rettner, C. T., Zare, R. N. 1982; 77 (5): 2416-2429
  • DETERMINATION OF THE ELECTRIC-DIPOLE MOMENT OF THE HSO RADICAL IN ITS X2A''(000) AND A2A'(003) ELECTRONIC STATES JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY Webster, C. R., Brucat, P. J., Zare, R. N. 1982; 92 (1): 184-202
  • DEPENDENCE OF PRODUCT ALIGNMENT ON PRODUCT VIBRATION FOR THE CA+F-2 CHEMI-LUMINESCENT REACTION CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS Prisant, M. G., Rettner, C. T., Zare, R. N. 1982; 88 (3): 271-274
  • LASER-INDUCED PHOTO-IONIZATION OF MOLECULAR-HYDROGEN - A TECHNIQUE TO MEASURE ROVIBRATIONAL GROUND-STATE POPULATIONS AIP CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS Marinero, E. E., Rettner, C. T., Zare, R. N. 1982: 400-401
  • QUANTUM-STATE-SPECIFIC DETECTION OF MOLECULAR-HYDROGEN BY 3-PHOTON IONIZATION PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS Marinero, E. E., Rettner, C. T., Zare, R. N. 1982; 48 (19): 1323-1326
  • OPTICAL PREPARATION OF ALIGNED REAGENTS BERICHTE DER BUNSEN-GESELLSCHAFT-PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CHEMICAL PHYSICS Zare, R. N. 1982; 86 (5): 422-425
  • HOW ISOLATED ARE MOLECULES IN A MOLECULAR-BEAM JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Lubman, D. M., Rettner, C. T., Zare, R. N. 1982; 86 (7): 1129-1135
  • PHOTONIZATION-PRODUCED ALIGNMENT OF CD PHYSICAL REVIEW A Greene, C. H., Zare, R. N. 1982; 25 (4): 2031-2037
  • UNIMOLECULAR FRAGMENTATION KINETICS BY MULTI-PHOTON IONIZATION CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS Proch, D., Rider, D. M., Zare, R. N. 1981; 81 (3): 430-434
  • MEASUREMENT OF PRODUCT ALIGNMENT IN BEAM-GAS CHEMI-LUMINESCENT REACTIONS JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Prisant, M. G., Rettner, C. T., Zare, R. N. 1981; 75 (5): 2222-2230
  • PHOTOCHEMICAL ISOTOPE-SEPARATION OF HG-196 BY REACTION WITH HYDROGEN HALIDES JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Webster, C. R., Zare, R. N. 1981; 85 (10): 1302-1305
  • DOES INTERNAL-CONVERSION RESULT IN THE STATISTICAL REDISTRIBUTION OF ENERGY JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR STRUCTURE Naaman, R., Lubman, D. M., Zare, R. N. 1980; 59 (JAN): 225-235
  • STEPWISE BOND-DISSOCIATION ENERGIES IN SULFUR-HEXAFLUORIDE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY Kiang, T., Zare, R. N. 1980; 102 (12): 4024-4029
  • MULTI-PHOTON IONIZATION OF AZULENE AND NAPHTHALENE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Lubman, D. M., Naaman, R., Zare, R. N. 1980; 72 (5): 3034-3040
  • STATE-TO-STATE REACTION DYNAMICS PHYSICS TODAY Zare, R. N., BERNSTEIN, R. B. 1980; 33 (11): 43-50
  • POLANYI MEMORIAL LECTURE FARADAY DISCUSSIONS Zare, R. N. 1979; 67: 7-15
  • LASER FLUORESCENCE IMMUNOASSAY OF INSULIN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Lidofsky, S. D., Imasaka, T., Zare, R. N. 1979; 51 (11): 1602-1605
  • ENZYME AMPLIFICATION LASER FLUORIMETRY ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Imasaka, T., Zare, R. N. 1979; 51 (13): 2082-2085
  • VIBRATIONAL ENERGY REDISTRIBUTION IN GLYOXAL FOLLOWING INTERNAL-CONVERSION JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS Naaman, R., Lubman, D. M., Zare, R. N. 1979; 71 (11): 4192-4200
  • EXPERIMENTAL-DETERMINATION OF SINGLET-TRIPLET SPLITTING IN METHYLENE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY LENGEL, R. K., Zare, R. N. 1978; 100 (24): 7495-7499
  • RADIATIONLESS PROCESSES IN A MOLECULAR-BEAM - TIME RESOLVED EMISSION FROM BENZOPHENONE CHEMICAL PHYSICS Naaman, R., Lubman, D. M., Zare, R. N. 1978; 32 (1): 17-22

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