Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Orthopaedic Surgery
  • Limb Transplantation via Immunotolerance
  • Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction
  • Nonunions and Malunions
  • Limb Salvage
  • Osteomyelitis

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Chief, Orthopaedic Trauma Service (2010 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Internship:UCSF School of Medicine (06/19/1986) CA
  • Residency:UCSF School of Medicine (06/30/1990) CA
  • Medical Education:UCLA - School of Medicine (6/10/1985) CA
  • Board Certification: Orthopaedic Surgery, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (1992)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Dr. Lowenberg is the Chief of the Orthopaedic Trauma Service at Stanford. He is a Past President of the Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Society of North America. His clinical and research interests are in the treatment of nonunions and malunions with or without accompanying osteomyelitis and infection. He is well-published in the field of limb salvage and treatment of devastating limb injuries. He has ongoing research in limb transplantation via immunotolerance as well as biomechanics.

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Long-term results and costs of muscle flap coverage with Ilizarov bone transport in lower limb salvage. Journal of orthopaedic trauma Lowenberg, D. W., Buntic, R. F., Buncke, G. M., Parrett, B. M. 2013; 27 (10): 576-581

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES:: To determine long-term outcomes and costs of Ilizarov bone transport and flap coverage for lower limb salvage. DESIGN:: Case series with retrospective review of outcomes with at least six year follow-up. SETTING:: Academic, tertiary care medical center. PATIENTS:: Thirty-four consecutive patients with traumatic lower extremity wounds and tibial defects who were recommended amputation but instead underwent complex limb salvage from 1993 to 2005. INTERVENTION:: Flap reconstruction and Ilizarov bone transport. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS:: Outcomes assessed were flap complications, infection, union, malunion, need for chronic narcotics, ambulation status, employment status, and need for re-operations. A cost analysis was performed comparing this treatment modality to amputation. RESULTS:: Thirty-four patients (mean age, 40 years) were included with 14 acute Gustilo IIIB/C defects and 20 chronic tibial defects (nonunion with osteomyelitis). Thirty five muscle flaps were performed with one flap loss (2.9%). The mean tibial bone defect was 8.7 cm, mean duration of bone transport was 10.8 months, and mean follow-up was 11 years. Primary nonunion rate at the docking site was 8.8% and malunion rate was 5.9%. All patients achieved final union with no cases of recurrent osteomyelitis. No patients underwent future amputations, 29% required re-operations, 97% were ambulating without assistance, 85% were working full time, and only 5.9% required chronic narcotics. Mean lifetime cost per patient per year after limb salvage was significantly less than the published cost for amputation. CONCLUSIONS:: The long-term results and costs of bone transport and flap coverage strongly support complex limb salvage in this patient population. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/BOT.0b013e31828afde4

    View details for PubMedID 23412507

  • Temporal Trends in the Incidence, Treatment, and Outcomes of Hip Fracture in Older Patients Initiating Dialysis in the United States CLINICAL JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NEPHROLOGY Nair, S. S., Mitani, A. A., Goldstein, B. A., Chertow, G. M., Lowenberg, D. W., Winkelmayer, W. C. 2013; 8 (8): 1336-1342

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patients with ESRD experience a fivefold higher incidence of hip fracture than the age- and sex-matched general population. Despite multiple changes in the treatment of CKD mineral bone disorder, little is known about long-term trends in hip fracture incidence, treatment patterns, and outcomes in patients on dialysis. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: Fourteen annual cohorts (1996-2009) of older patients (≥67 years) initiating dialysis in the United States were studied. Eligible patients had Medicare fee-for-service coverage for ≥2 years before dialysis initiation and were followed for ≤3 years for a first hip fracture. Type of treatment (internal fixation or partial or total hip replacement) was ascertained along with 30-day mortality. Cox and modified Poisson regressions were used to describe trends in study outcomes. RESULTS: This study followed 409,040 patients over 607,059 person-years, during which time 17,887 hip fracture events were recorded (29.3 events/1000 person-years). Compared with patients incident for ESRD in 1996, adjusted hip fracture rates increased until the 2004 cohort (+41%) and declined thereafter. Surgical treatment included internal fixation in 56%, partial hip replacement in 29%, and total hip replacement in 2%, which remained essentially unchanged over time; 30-day mortality after hip fracture declined from 20% (1996) to 16% (2009). CONCLUSIONS: Hip fracture incidence rates remain higher today than in patients reaching ESRD in 1996, despite multiple purported improvements in the management of CKD mineral bone disorder. Although recent declines in incidence and steady declines in associated short-term mortality are encouraging, hip fractures remain among the most common and consequential noncardiovascular complications of ESRD.

    View details for DOI 10.2215/CJN.10901012

    View details for Web of Science ID 000323122500011

    View details for PubMedID 23660182

  • Assessment of Compromised Fracture Healing JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEONS Bishop, J. A., Palanca, A. A., Bellino, M. J., Lowenberg, D. W. 2012; 20 (5): 273-282

    Abstract

    No standard criteria exist for diagnosing fracture nonunion, and studies suggest that assessment of fracture healing varies among orthopaedic surgeons. This variability can be problematic in both clinical and orthopaedic trauma research settings. An understanding of risk factors for nonunion and of diagnostic tests used to assess fracture healing can facilitate a systematic approach to evaluation and management. Risk factors for nonunion include medical comorbidities, age, and the characteristics of the injury. The method of fracture management also influences healing. Comprehensive evaluation includes an assessment of the patient's symptoms, signs, and immune and endocrine status as well as the biologic capacity of the fracture, presence of infection, and quality of reduction and fixation. Diagnostic tests include plain radiography, CT, ultrasonography, fluoroscopy, bone scan, MRI, and several laboratory tests, including assays for bone turnover markers in the peripheral circulation. A systematic approach to evaluating fracture union can help surgeons determine the timing and nature of interventions.

    View details for DOI 10.5435/JAAOS-20-05-273

    View details for Web of Science ID 000303366800003

    View details for PubMedID 22553099

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