Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatric Nephrology

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Medical Education:University of Washington Medical Center (1999) WA
  • Internship:Maricopa Medical Center (2000) AZ
  • Residency:Maricopa Medical Center (2002) AZ
  • Fellowship:Children's Hospital Boston (2005) MA
  • Board Certification: Pediatric Nephrology, American Board of Pediatrics (2008)

Publications

Journal Articles


  • CKiD (CKD in Children) Prospective Cohort Study: A Review of Current Findings AMERICAN JOURNAL OF KIDNEY DISEASES Wong, C. J., Moxey-Mims, M., Jerry-Fluker, J., Warady, B. A., Furth, S. L. 2012; 60 (6): 1002-1011

    Abstract

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a life-long condition associated with substantial morbidity and premature death due to complications from a progressive decrease in kidney function. The incidence and prevalence of all stages of CKD in children continues to increase worldwide. Between 2000 and 2008, the kidney replacement therapy incidence rate in those aged 0-19 years increased 5.9% to 15 per million population, highlighting the importance of CKD research in children. Many comorbid conditions seen in adults with CKD, including cardiovascular disease and cognitive impairment, also are highly prevalent in children, implicitly demonstrating the crucial need for initiating therapy early to improve health outcomes in children with CKD. The CKiD (Chronic Kidney Disease in Children) Study is a prospective cohort study of 586 children aged 1-16 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 30-90 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Since its inception, CKiD has identified risk factors for CKD progression and cardiovascular disease in children with CKD and highlighted the effects of CKD on outcomes unique to children, including neurocognitive development and growth. This review summarizes the findings to date, illustrating the spectrum of CKD-associated complications in children and emphasizing areas requiring further investigation. Taken in sum, these elements stress that initiating treatment at an early age is essential for reducing long-term morbidity and mortality in children with CKD.

    View details for DOI 10.1053/j.ajkd.2012.07.018

    View details for Web of Science ID 000310845100018

    View details for PubMedID 23022429

  • Rituximab treatment for recurrence of nephrotic syndrome in a pediatric patient after renal transplantation for congenital nephrotic syndrome of Finnish type PEDIATRIC TRANSPLANTATION Chaudhuri, A., Kambham, N., Sutherland, S., Grimm, P., Alexander, S., Concepcion, W., Sarwal, M., Wong, C. 2012; 16 (5): E183-E187

    Abstract

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS) of the Finnish type due to mutation in the NPHS-1 gene results in massive proteinuria due to structural abnormality in the glomerular slit diaphragm, and is usually refractory to immunosuppressive therapy. Patients eventually require bilateral nephrectomy and renal replacement therapy, with transplantation being the ultimate goal. Post-transplant recurrence of nephrotic syndrome occurs in about 25% of children and is thought to be immune-mediated secondary to antibodies formed against the nephrin protein in renal allograft. Conventional therapy with calcineurin inhibitors (CNI), cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids with or without plasmapheresis often fails to achieve remission resulting in graft loss in 12-16%. There is limited experience with use of rituximab (RTX) in pediatric organ transplant recipients. We report the first case of post-transplant recurrence of nephrotic syndrome in a 4-yr-old child with CNS due to NPHS-1 mutation in whom CNI, corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide therapy was unsuccessful, but who achieved remission after depletion of B cells with RTX, associated with a decrease in the level of anti-nephrin antibodies. The child remains in remission 5 yr following treatment. Our experience suggests that activated B cells may play a pivotal role in the recurrence of nephrosis after renal transplantation in children with CNS.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1399-3046.2011.01519.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000306131700011

    View details for PubMedID 21672106

  • Casual Blood Pressure and Neurocognitive Function in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Report of the Children with Chronic Kidney Disease Cohort Study CLINICAL JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NEPHROLOGY Lande, M. B., Gerson, A. C., Hooper, S. R., Cox, C., Matheson, M., Mendley, S. R., Gipson, D. S., Wong, C., Warady, B. A., Furth, S. L., Flynn, J. T. 2011; 6 (8): 1831-1837

    Abstract

    Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at risk for cognitive dysfunction, and over half have hypertension. Data on the potential contribution of hypertension to CKD-associated neurocognitive deficits in children are limited. Our objective was to determine whether children with CKD and elevated BP (EBP) had decreased performance on neurocognitive testing compared with children with CKD and normal BP.This was a cross-sectional analysis of the relation between auscultatory BP and neurocognitive test performance in children 6 to 17 years enrolled in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) project.Of 383 subjects, 132 (34%) had EBP (systolic BP and/or diastolic BP ≥90(th) percentile). Subjects with EBP had lower mean (SD) scores on Wechsler Abbreviated Scales of Intelligence (WASI) Performance IQ than those with normal BP (normal BP versus EBP, 96.1 (16.7) versus 92.4 (14.9), P = 0.03) and WASI Full Scale IQ (97.0 (16.2) versus 93.4 (16.5), P = 0.04). BP index (subject's BP/95(th) percentile BP) correlated inversely with Performance IQ score (systolic, r = -0.13, P = 0.01; diastolic, r = -0.19, P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, the association between lower Performance IQ score and increased BP remained significant after controlling for demographic and disease-related variables (EBP, β = -3.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -7.3 to -0.06; systolic BP index, β = -1.16 to 95% CI: -2.1, -0.21; diastolic BP index, β = -1.17, 95% CI: -1.8 to -0.55).Higher BP was independently associated with decreased WASI Performance IQ scores in children with mild-to-moderate CKD.

    View details for DOI 10.2215/CJN.00810111

    View details for Web of Science ID 000293721400007

    View details for PubMedID 21700829

  • Donor-specific antibody against denatured HLA-A1: Clinically nonsignificant? HUMAN IMMUNOLOGY Pereira, S., Perkins, S., Lee, J., Shumway, W., LeFor, W., Lopez-Cepero, M., Wong, C., Connolly, A., Tan, J. C., Grumet, F. C. 2011; 72 (6): 492-498

    Abstract

    Pre-transplant screening of a woman with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) showed no anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alloantibodies by anti-human globulin-complement-dependent cytotoxicity (AHG-CDC; class I) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (class II). Following a negative AHG-CDC crossmatch, an HLA*01:01+ deceased donor (DD) kidney was transplanted in September 2005. Subsequent screening of pre-transplant serum by LABScreen Single Antigen (SA) array showed strong reactivity versus A*01:01. Despite that reactivity, at 5 years post-transplant, the patient has a serum creatinine of 1.6 mg/dl and has never experienced humoral or cellular rejection. Retrospective flow-cytometric crossmatch of pre- and post-transplant sera versus DD cells was negative. Rescreening of multiple pre- and post-transplant sera revealed anti-A1 reactivity persisting from the first through the last samples tested. The patient's anti-A1 was almost two fold more reactive with denatured A*01:01 FlowPRA SA beads after denaturation with acid treatment (pH 2.7) than with untreated beads. Parallel results were observed with pH 2.7 treated versus untreated A1+ T cells in FXM. These data highlight the difficulty in interpreting screening results obtained using bead arrays, because of antibodies that appear to recognize denatured but not native class I HLA antigens. We suggest that such bead-positive, flow cytometric crossmatch negative antibodies are not associated with humoral rejection, may not necessarily be detrimental to a graft, and deserve further evaluation before becoming a barrier to transplantation.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.humimm.2011.02.012

    View details for Web of Science ID 000291138900005

    View details for PubMedID 21396421

  • Role of Twenty-Four-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Children on Dialysis CLINICAL JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NEPHROLOGY Chaudhuri, A., Sutherland, S. M., Begin, B., Salsbery, K., McCabe, L., Potter, D., Alexander, S. R., Wong, C. J. 2011; 6 (4): 870-876

    Abstract

    Pre- or postdialysis BP recordings are imprecise, can be biased, and have poor test-retest reliability in children on dialysis. We aimed to examine the possible differences between pre- and postdialysis BP levels and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) in diagnosis of hypertension (HTN).Twenty-four children on dialysis had 24-hour ABPM in the interdialytic period, and values were compared with average pre- and postdialysis systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) recordings that week. Each patient had an echocardiogram to determine presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH).By ABPM, 8% of patients had white coat HTN and 12% had masked HTN. There was no significant difference in diagnosis of systolic HTN based on ABPM daytime SBP mean or load and postdialysis SBP. However, only 15% of patients had diastolic HTN based on postdialysis measures, whereas 46% of patients had significantly elevated daytime DBP loads and 71% had high nighttime DBP loads on ABPM. Forty-eight percent of patients were SBP nondippers. Children with LVH had higher daytime and nighttime SBP loads, significantly higher daytime and nighttime DBP loads, and lesser degree of nocturnal dipping of SBP compared with those who did not.ABPM is more informative than pre- and postdialysis BPs and improves the predictability of BP as a risk factor for target organ damage. Diagnosis and treatment monitoring of HTN among pediatric dialysis patients is enhanced with addition of ABPM.

    View details for DOI 10.2215/CJN.07960910

    View details for Web of Science ID 000289223600026

    View details for PubMedID 21273374

  • Steroid-Free Immunosuppression Since 1999: 129 Pediatric Renal Transplants with Sustained Graft and Patient Benefits AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TRANSPLANTATION Li, L., Chang, A., Naesens, M., Kambham, N., Waskerwitz, J., Martin, J., Wong, C., Alexander, S., Grimm, P., Concepcion, W., Salvatierra, O., Sarwal, M. M. 2009; 9 (6): 1362-1372

    Abstract

    Despite early promising patient and graft outcomes with steroid-free (SF) immunosuppression in pediatric kidney transplant recipients, data on long-term safety and efficacy results are lacking. We present our single-center experience with 129 consecutive pediatric kidney transplant recipients on SF immunosuppression, with a mean follow-up of 5 years. Outcomes are compared against a matched cohort of 57 concurrent recipients treated with steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression. In the SF group, 87% of kidney recipients with functioning grafts remain corticosteroid-free. Actual intent-to-treat SF (ITT-SF) and still-on-protocol SF patient survivals are 96% and 96%, respectively, actual graft survivals for both groups are 93% and 96%, respectively and actual death-censored graft survivals for both groups are 97% and 99%, respectively. Unprecedented catch-up growth is observed in SF recipients below 12 years of age. Continued low rates of acute rejection, posttransplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM), hypertension and hyperlipidemia are seen in SF patients, with sustained benefits for graft function. In conclusion, extended enrollment and longer experience with SF immunosuppression for renal transplantation in low-risk children confirms protocol safety, continued benefits for growth and graft function, low acute rejection rates and reduced cardiovascular morbidity.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2009.02640.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000266448900017

    View details for PubMedID 19459814

  • Patient selection critical for calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal in pediatric kidney transplantation PEDIATRIC TRANSPLANTATION Weintraub, L., Li, L., Kambham, N., Alexander, S., Concepcion, W., Miller, K., Wong, C., Salvatierra, O., Sarwal, M. 2008; 12 (5): 541-549

    Abstract

    CNI withdrawal may be employed as a "rescue" strategy for patients with established renal allograft injury and/or declining allograft function, with the aim at eliminating CNI-associated nephrotoxic effects. This analysis reviews outcomes in a pediatric population and identifies risk factors for adverse events post-CNI withdrawal. We performed a retrospective analysis of 17 pediatric renal transplants who underwent CNI withdrawal, with conversion to sirolimus and MMF. Mean CrCl decreased from 64.3 +/- 22 to 59.38 +/- 28.6 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (p = 0.04) at six months and 57.46 +/- 31.1 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (p = 0.02) at 12 months post-withdrawal. Forty-one percent of patients experienced AR. Increased risk for AR was associated with prior AR history, lower sirolimus trough levels, and lower CNIT biopsy scores. Graft loss (24%) was associated with worse CrCl, proteinuria, and histologic chronicity. Proteinuria (spot protein/creatinine ratio) increased from 0.75 +/- 1.0 to 1.71 +/- 2.0 (p = 0.03), unrelated to de novo sirolimus use. Four patients returned to CNI-based immunosuppression due to AR (n = 3) and gastrointestinal side effects (n = 1). Careful selection of pediatric candidates for CNI withdrawal is recommended. Worsening graft function and graft loss may be minimized by selecting patients with high CNIT scores and low biopsy chronicity and excluding patients with prior AR history.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1399-3046.2007.00847.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000257700900013

    View details for PubMedID 18564305

  • Severe cryptosporidiosis in a seven-year-old renal transplant recipient - Case report and review of the literature PEDIATRIC TRANSPLANTATION Hong, D. K., Wong, C. J., Gutierrez, K. 2007; 11 (1): 94-100

    Abstract

    Cryptosporidium is an intracellular protozoa that can cause gastroenteritis in humans. In immunocompromised hosts, infection can be severe, leading to life-threatening persistent diarrhea. There is limited experience in treating this infection in solid organ transplants. Although newer drugs active against Cryptosporidium exist, they are only licensed in the USA for treatment of immunocompetent hosts. Here we describe a seven-year-old renal transplant recipient with severe cryptosporidiosis. He had a protracted course of diarrhea of up to 2 L/day. He was successfully managed with combination antimicrobial therapy including nitazoxanide, paromomycin, and azithromycin. In conjunction with this regimen, he had a reduction in immunosuppression and complete bowel rest. His stool pattern normalized in four weeks and he has had no recurrence after six months of follow up.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1399-3046.2006.00593.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000244147500017

    View details for PubMedID 17239130

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