Bio

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Associate Program Director, Stanford University Internal Medicine Residency Program (2010 - 2014)
  • Co-Director, Palo Alto Veterans Health Care System Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (2010 - Present)
  • Co-Director, Stanford Intensive Global Health Course (2012 - Present)
  • Program Lead for Global Health, Stanford University Internal Medicine Residency Program (2014 - Present)
  • Co-Director, Underserved/Global Health Pathway of Distinction, Stanford University Internal Medicine Residency Program (2015 - Present)
  • Faculty Fellow, Center for Innovation in Global Health (2015 - Present)
  • Faculty Advisor, Stanford Graduate Medical Education (GME) Women In Medicine Leadership Council (2016 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Graduated with High Honors, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University (1992)
  • Phi Beta Kappa, Vanderbilt University (1992)
  • Alpha Omega Alpha, The University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine (1999)
  • Jack Remington, MD Infectious Diseases Fellow's Award for Clinical Excellence, Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases (2005)
  • Timothy F. Beckett Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching by a Fellow, Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine Residency Program (2005)
  • Infectious Diseases Division Teaching Award, Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine (2010, 2015)
  • Kenneth L. Vosti, MD Infectious Diseases Faculty Teaching Award, Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases (2009, 2010, 2015)
  • David A. Rytand Clinical Teaching Award, Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine Residency Program (2011, 2016, 2017)

Professional Education


  • BA, Vanderbilt University, Psychology (1992)
  • MD, The University of Chicago, Medicine (2000)
  • Tropical Medicine & Hygiene, Gorgas Memorial Institute (Lima, Peru), Tropical Medicine (DTM&H) (2007)
  • Certificate of Knowledge, Tropical Medicine and Travelers' Health, American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) (2008)

Community and International Work


  • Stanford J&J Rotation Director at Mulago Hospital, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda

    Topic

    Defining the clinical and teaching role of Stanford residents and faculty visiting Mulago Hospital.

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Yale/Stanford Physician Scholars in International Health

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Clinical service/teaching in Nepal, India, Thailand, Burkina Faso, Zimbabwe, Uganda, Rwanda

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Featured speaker for a course on low-cost HIV diagnostic testing - July 2006, Harare, Zimbabwe

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Comparison of Guava EasyCD4 Versus BD FACSCount for CD4+ T Lymphocyte Enumeration, Ouahigouya, Burkina Faso

    Topic

    Validation of low-cost CD4+ T lymphocyte enumeration technology

    Partnering Organization(s)

    AIDS Empowerment and Treatment International (AIDSETI)

    Populations Served

    HIV-infected adults and children

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Publications

All Publications


  • A high value care curriculum for interns: a description of curricular design, implementation and housestaff feedback. Postgraduate medical journal Hom, J., Kumar, A., Evans, K. H., Svec, D., Richman, I., Fang, D., Smeraglio, A., Holubar, M., Johnson, T., Shah, N., Renault, C., Ahuja, N., Witteles, R., Harman, S., Shieh, L. 2017

    Abstract

    Most residency programmes do not have a formal high value care curriculum. Our goal was to design and implement a multidisciplinary high value care curriculum specifically targeted at interns.Our curriculum was designed with multidisciplinary input from attendings, fellows and residents at Stanford. Curricular topics were inspired by the American Board of Internal Medicine's Choosing Wisely campaign, Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine, American College of Physicians and Society of Hospital Medicine. Our topics were as follows: introduction to value-based care; telemetry utilisation; lab ordering; optimal approach to thrombophilia work-ups and fresh frozen plasma use; optimal approach to palliative care referrals; antibiotic stewardship; and optimal approach to imaging for low back pain. Our curriculum was implemented at the Stanford Internal Medicine residency programme over the course of two academic years (2014 and 2015), during which 100 interns participated in our high value care curriculum. After each high value care session, interns were offered the opportunity to complete surveys regarding feedback on the curriculum, self-reported improvements in knowledge, skills and attitudinal module objectives, and quiz-based knowledge assessments.The overall survey response rate was 67.1%. Overall, the material was rated as highly useful on a 5-point Likert scale (mean 4.4, SD 0.6). On average, interns reported a significant improvement in their self-rated knowledge, skills and attitudes after the six seminars (mean improvement 1.6 points, SD 0.4 (95% CI 1.5 to 1.7), p<0.001).We successfully implemented a novel high value care curriculum that specifically targets intern physicians.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/postgradmedj-2016-134617

    View details for PubMedID 28663352

  • Mycobacterium leprae In: Mandell, Douglas and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, 8th edition Renault, C. A., Ernst, J. D. 2014
  • Time to clearance of Chlamydia trachomatis ribosomal RNA in women treated for chlamydial infection SEXUAL HEALTH Renault, C. A., Israelski, D. M., Levy, V., Fujikawa, B. K., Kellogg, T. A., Klausner, J. D. 2011; 8 (1): 69-73

    Abstract

    The dynamics of chlamydia clearance after treatment administration for chlamydial urogenital infection are unknown. We estimated the time to clearance of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) after administration of azithromycin for cervical chlamydial infection using APTIMA Combo 2 (Gen-Probe, Inc., San Diego, CA, USA).A total of 115 women diagnosed with urogenital chlamydial infection, defined as a positive APTIMA urine or endocervical specimen, were enrolled in the present study. Vaginal swabs on the day of treatment (Day 0) and on Days 3, 7, 10 and 14 after treatment with 1 g of azithromycin were self-obtained by participants. Specimens were tested in a single laboratory. Our analysis was limited to women who were CT-confirmed by vaginal swab at baseline, who returned all follow-up swabs, and who reported sexual abstinence during the follow-up period (n = 61).Among 61 participants, 48 (79%) had a negative APTIMA at Day 14. Subjects with a negative APTIMA at each time-point were as follows: 0/61 (0%) on Day 0, 7/61 (12%) on Day 3, 28/61 (46%) on Day 7, 40/61 (66%) on Day 10, and 48/61 (79%) on Day 14. Multiple linear regression analysis predicted time to clearance at 17 days (95% confidence interval, 16-18 days) after administration of azithromycin. Seventeen of the 94 participants (18.1%) who screened positive for chlamydia had a negative vaginal swab on Day 0, indicating possible spontaneous clearance of CT.After treatment, CT rRNA declined with time. As rRNA was still detectable in 21% of the women 14 days after treatment, APTIMA should not be used as a test-of-cure in the 14-day period following azithromycin administration.

    View details for DOI 10.1071/SH10030

    View details for Web of Science ID 000286518400013

    View details for PubMedID 21371385

  • Trypanosoma brucei infection in a HIV positive Ugandan male Clinical Laboratory Science Dill, E., Renault C, Kirkpatrick BD 2011; 24 (2): 85-88
  • Is spinal tuberculosis contagious? INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES Schirmer, P., Renault, C. A., Holodniy, M. 2010; 14 (8): E659-E666

    Abstract

    While pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections are recognized for their public health implications, less is known about the infectiousness of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, specifically, spinal tuberculosis or Pott's disease. We present a case of spinal tuberculosis with concomitant active pulmonary tuberculosis in the absence of chest radiographic abnormalities or symptoms, and review the literature regarding infectiousness of concomitant spinal and pulmonary tuberculosis.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijid.2009.11.009

    View details for Web of Science ID 000282662100003

    View details for PubMedID 20181507

  • Validation of Microcapillary Flow Cytometry for Community-Based CD4+ T Lymphocyte Enumeration in Remote Burkina Faso The Open AIDS Journal Renault CA, Traore A, Machekano RN, Israelski DM 2010; 4: 171-175
  • Mycobacterium leprae In: Mandell G, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, 7th edition Renault, C. A., Ernst, J. D. 2010
  • Lower-Cost Laboratory Monitoring for CD4 T-Lymphocyte Enumeration, HIV RNA Quantitation and Drug Resistance. In: Marlink RG, Teitelman SJ, eds., From the Ground Up: Building Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Care Programs in Resource-Limited Settings Kassaye, S., Renault, C. A., Israelski, D. M. 2009
  • Use of NAATs for STD diagnosis of GC and CT in non-FDA -cleared anatomic specimens. MLO: medical laboratory observer Renault, C. A., Hall, C., Kent, C. K., Klausner, J. D. 2006; 38 (7): 10-?

    View details for PubMedID 16918168

  • Avian influenza in humans: A practical review for clinicians INFECTIONS IN MEDICINE Eckburg, P. B., Schneider, J. J., Renault, C. A. 2005; 22 (11): 535-?