Publications

Journal Articles


  • A National Study on Craniosynostosis Surgical Repair. The Cleft palate-craniofacial journal : official publication of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association Nguyen, C., Hernandez-Boussard, T., Khosla, R. K., Curtin, C. M. 2012

    Abstract

    Objective :? Our study aimed to use national data to assess the perioperative outcomes of craniosynostosis surgical repair. Design :? Data were obtained from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids Inpatient Database from 1997, 2000, 2003, and 2006. Setting :? Community hospitals in the United States. Patients :? The cohort was identified using the ICD-9-CM procedure codes for craniosynostosis surgical repair (2.01, 2.03, 2.04, 2.06). Main Outcome Measures(s) :? We determined patient and hospital characteristics. We clustered patients by age group (<7 months, 7 to 12 months, 1 to 3 years) and assessed mortality, comorbidities, mean length of stay (LOS), and total charge. We performed logistic regression with our dependent variable being longer average hospital stay: LOS >4.2 days. Results :? We found 3426 patients. Average age at the time of surgery was 181 days (SD 84). Average length of stay was 4.2 days. The majority of the patients were boys (66%), white (71%), and insured (93%). Nearly all patients underwent surgery in a teaching hospital (98%) in urban centers (99%). Approximately 10% of patients experienced an acute complication, most commonly hemorrhages or hematomas and airway or respiratory failure. Patients ages 1 to 3 years had the highest rates of comorbidities and a longer LOS. Mortality rate was <1%. Conclusions :? Craniosynostosis surgery is safe with low rates of mortality and acute complications. LOS >4.2 appears to be associated more with comorbidities than with complications. Higher rates of comorbidities and LOS >4.2 days for patients age 1 to 3 years warrant addition research to assess potential barriers to care.

    View details for PubMedID 23030675

  • A Little Known but Potentially Life-threatening Association of Bullous Pemphigoid and Acquired Hemophilia: Case Report and Review of the Literature J Clin Exp Dermatol Res Nguyen C, Gordon J, Chang AS 2012; S6:003

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