Bio

Bio


Currently Medical Director at Amino, a consumer healthcare company that aims to revolutionize the way people find doctors for themselves and their loved ones.

Clinical Focus


  • Anesthesiology

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Medical Director, Amino (http://amino.com) (2014 - Present)
  • Chief Resident - Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford Healthcare (2013 - 2014)
  • Appointed committee member, Legislative and Practice Affairs Division, California Society of Anesthesiologists (2011 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Anesthesia Training Program in Biomedical Research (T32 GM089626), Stanford University School of Medicine (2014)
  • Chief Resident - Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford Hospital & Clinics (2013-2014)
  • Loan Repayment Program, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health (2013-2014)
  • Resident Scholar, Foundation for Anesthesia Education and Research (2012)
  • Resident Award, Committee on Professional Diversity, American Society of Anesthesiologists (2011)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Committee Member, Legislative and Practice Affairs Division, California Society of Anesthesiologists (CSA) (2011 - Present)
  • Member, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) (2011 - Present)
  • Member, International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS) (2011 - Present)
  • Member, Resident Education Committee - Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine (2011 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Medical Education:Stanford University (2010) CA
  • Residency:Stanford Hospital and ClinicsCA
  • Internship:Santa Clara Valley Medical CenterCA
  • Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, Atul Butte Lab, Stanford University School of Medicine, Biomedical Informatics (2014)
  • Resident, Stanford Hospital & Clinics, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (2014)
  • Intern, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, CA, Transitional Year (2011)
  • MD, Stanford University School of Medicine, Doctor of Medicine, Concentration in Biomedical Informatics (2010)
  • BS, Stanford University, Chemistry with a minor in Biological Science (2005)

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Preferred spoken language mediates differences in neuraxial labor analgesia utilization among racial and ethnic groups INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRIC ANESTHESIA Caballero, J. A., Butwick, A. J., Carvalho, B., Riley, E. T. 2014; 23 (2): 161-167

    Abstract

    The aims of this study were to assess racial/ethnic disparities for neuraxial labor analgesia utilization and to determine if preferred spoken language mediates the association between race/ethnicity and neuraxial labor analgesia utilization.We performed a retrospective cohort study of 3129 obstetric patients who underwent vaginal delivery at a tertiary care obstetric center. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess the relationships between race/ethnicity, preferred spoken language and neuraxial labor analgesia.Hispanic ethnicity (adjusted OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.61-0.98) and multiparity (adjusted OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.51-0.69) were independently associated with a reduced likelihood of neuraxial labor analgesia utilization. When preferred spoken language was controlled for, the effect of Hispanic ethnicity was no longer significant (adjusted OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.66-1.08) and only non-English preferred spoken language (adjusted OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.67-0.99) and multiparity (adjusted OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.51-0.69) were associated with a reduced likelihood of neuraxial labor analgesia utilization.This study provides evidence that preferred spoken language mediates the relationship between Hispanic ethnicity and neuraxial labor analgesia utilization.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijoa.2013.09.001

    View details for Web of Science ID 000336703300011

    View details for PubMedID 24703871

  • Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Obstetrics and Obstetric Anesthesia in the United States Current Anesthesiology Reports Toledo, P., Caballero, J. A. 2013; 3 (4): 292-9
  • Defining the Molecular Signature of Chemotherapy-Mediated Lung Tumor Phenotype Modulation and Increased Susceptibility to T-Cell Killing CANCER BIOTHERAPY AND RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS Gameiro, S. R., Caballero, J. A., Hodge, J. W. 2012; 27 (1): 23-35

    Abstract

    Chemotherapy with platinum doublets, including cisplatin plus vinorelbine, is standard of care for non-small-cell lung cancer. Sublethal exposure to certain chemotherapeutic agents has been demonstrated to alter the phenotype or biology of human tumor cells, rendering them more susceptible to cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated lysis. The effects of cisplatin/vinorelbine on tumor sensitivity to T-cell cytotoxicity and its molecular mechanisms, however, have not been fully elucidated. We examined the effect of this chemotherapy on growth, cell-surface phenotype, and CTL-mediated lysis of five distinct human lung carcinoma cell lines in vitro and examined the molecular mechanisms associated with enhanced CTL sensitivity. These studies demonstrate that sublethal exposure of human lung tumor cells to the platinum doublet modulates tumor cell phenotype and increases sensitivity to major histocompatibility complex-restricted perforin/granzyme-mediated CTL killing. These studies also demonstrate that exposure to chemotherapy markedly decreased the protein secretion ratio of transforming growth factor-?/interleukin (IL)-8. We examined the gene expression profile of two lung tumor cell lines to identify a shared gene signature in response to sublethal cisplatin/vinorelbine and found coordinate expression of only 16 transcripts, including those for cytokine/chemokine expression and apoptosis such as tumor necrosis factor-?, IL8, CXCL5, and B cell lymphoma-2-like genes (BCL-2). Overall, these results suggest that sublethal exposure to cisplatin/vinorelbine increases sensitivity to perforin/granzyme-mediated CTL killing by modulation of (a) tumor phenotype, (b) cytokine/chemokine milieu, and (c) the proapoptotic/antiapoptotic gene ratio. The data presented here propose a complex mechanism that is distinct from and complementary to that of immunogenic cell death. This molecular signature may be useful in predicting responses to immunotherapy as well as provide the rationale for the potential clinical benefit of the combined use of vaccine with cisplatin/vinorelbine regimens.

    View details for DOI 10.1089/cbr.2012.1203

    View details for Web of Science ID 000300595200005

    View details for PubMedID 22316209

  • Prognostic Factors for Survival in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent Brain Metastases After Prior Whole Brain Radiotherapy International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics Caballero, J. A., Sneed, P. K., Lamborn, K. R., Ma, L., Denduluri, S., Nakamura, J. L., Barani, I. J., McDermott, M. W. 2012; 83 (1): 303-9
  • Exploitation of differential homeostatic proliferation of T-cell subsets following chemotherapy to enhance the efficacy of vaccine-mediated antitumor responses CANCER IMMUNOLOGY IMMUNOTHERAPY Gameiro, S. R., Caballero, J. A., Higgins, J. P., Apelian, D., Hodge, J. W. 2011; 60 (9): 1227-1242

    Abstract

    The 5-year survival rate for stage IB-III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains 15%. Surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine is one standard-of-care. We sought to determine in a preclinical model whether (a) the combination of cisplatin and vinorelbine could positively modulate components of the immune system independent of antitumor activity, and (b) there were synergistic effects of this drug combination and vaccine immunotherapy. We examined the effect of cisplatin/vinorelbine on gene expression, cell-surface phenotype, and CTL-mediated cytolysis of murine lung carcinoma cells in vitro; we also assessed the effects of cisplatin/vinorelbine on immune subsets and function of Tregs in vivo. Finally, we evaluated the potential synergy between chemotherapy and a recombinant yeast-CEA vaccine in a murine model transgenic for CEA with mice bearing lung tumors. These studies demonstrate that exposure of lung tumor cells to the platinum doublet cisplatin/vinorelbine modulates tumor cell phenotype and increases sensitivity to CTL-mediated cytolysis. These studies also demonstrate that cisplatin/vinorelbine (a) induces sub-myeloablative leucopenia that differentially modulates reconstitution of Treg versus effector T-cell subsets and (b) can be employed synergistically with vaccine, exploiting homeostatic peripheral expansion of T cells. Antitumor studies show for the first time that cisplatin/vinorelbine combined with vaccine increases the survival of mice with established NSCLC. These findings provide the rationale for the potential clinical benefit of the combined use of vaccine with cisplatin/vinorelbine chemotherapy regimens.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s00262-011-1020-8

    View details for Web of Science ID 000294215600003

    View details for PubMedID 21544650

Conference Proceedings


  • Chemotherapy can enhance the therapeutic potential of vaccine-mediated immunotherapy and improve CTL-mediated cytolysis 51st Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Caballero, J. A., et al 2009

Presentations


  • Getting Personal: The emerging role of big data in anesthesiology, pain, and perioperative medicine

    Grand Rounds

    Time Period

    10/28/2013

    Presented To

    Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine - Stanford University School of Medicine

    Location

    Stanford, CA

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