Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Cancer > GI Oncology
  • Gastrointestinal Cancers
  • Oncology (Cancer)
  • Medical Oncology

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Internship:Oregon Health Sciences Univ Hospital (1997) OR
  • Residency:Oregon Health Sciences Univ Hospital (1999) OR
  • Fellowship:Stanford University School of Medicine (2002) CA
  • Medical Education:Georgetown University Hospital (1996) DC

Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials


  • Study of TAC-101 as Second Line Treatment in Patients With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Who Received Sorafenib as First Line Therapy Not Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether TAC-101 as a second line therapy for patients who received Sorafenib as first line therapy is effective in slowing tumor activity in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The study is also looking at the safety of TAC-101 following treatment with Sorafenib.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Kerry Hsieh, (650) 724 - 7245.

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  • Phase III Trans-Arterial Chemo-Embolization (TACE) Adjuvant HCC Not Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to compare the Overall Survival (OS) of HCC patients who receive brivanib as adjuvant treatments to TACE therapy, with the OS of HCC patients who receive matched placebo with TACE therapy.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Rebecca Bristol, (650) 721 - 3114.

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  • A Phase 1 Study of Safety and Bioactivity With FG-3019 in Combination With Gemcitabine and Erlotinib for Subjects With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Not Recruiting

    Objectives - Primary: To evaluate the safety and tolerability of FG-3019 in combination with gemcitabine and erlotinib - Secondary: To evaluate the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of FG-3019 in combination with gemcitabine and erlotinib

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Donna Williams, (650) 498 - 6608.

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  • Combination SBRT (Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy) With TACE (Transarterial Chemoembolization) for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma Not Recruiting

    To establish the efficacy and toxicity of TACE combined with SBRT

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Laurie Ann Columbo, 650-736-0792.

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  • Phase III Study of PI-88 in Post-resection Hepatocellular Carcinoma Not Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to determine if PI-88 is effective and safe in patients who have had surgery to remove primary liver cancer.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Kerry Hsieh, (650) 724 - 7245.

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  • Transarterial Chemoembolization vs CyberKnife for Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma Not Recruiting

    Primary Objective: To compare the efficacy of TACE vs. CyberKnife SBRT in the treatment of locally recurrent HCC after initial TACE. Secondary Objectives: 1. To determine the progression-free survival of TACE vs. CyberKnife SBRT 2. To determine the overall survival of TACE vs. CyberKnife SBRT for locally recurrent HCC 3. To determine the toxicities associated with TACE or CyberKnife SBRT for the treatment of recurrent HCC.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Laurie Ann Columbo, (650) 736 - 0792.

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  • Perfusion CT as a Predictor of Treatment Response in Patients With Hepatic Malignancies Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether baseline CT perfusion characteristics (measurements of blood-flow using CT) of hepatic cancers can predict tumor response to treatment and whether perfusion CT after treatment can be used as a biomarker for response to treatment. Treatment may consist of chemotherapy or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT)or embolization therapy.

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  • Chemoembolization With or Without Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery Recruiting

    This randomized phase III trial is studying chemoembolization and sorafenib tosylate to see how well they work compared with chemoembolization alone in treating patients with liver cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, mitomycin, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Chemoembolization kills tumor cells by carrying drugs directly into the tumor and blocking the blood flow to the tumor. Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving chemoembolization together with sorafenib tosylate is more effective than chemoembolization alone in treating patients with liver cancer.

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  • Phase I Dose Escalation of Stereotactic Radiosurgical Boost for Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer Not Recruiting

    To study the safety and feasibility of stereotactic radiation dose escalation following neoadjuvant chemotherapy with concurrent conventionally fractionated radiation, by evaluating the acute and late toxicity of treatment.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Laurie Ann Columbo, (650) 736 - 0792.

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  • Perfusion CT as a Predictor of Treatment Response in Patients With Rectal Cancer Recruiting

    Recent advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have made CT perfusion imaging feasible for the assessment of tumor perfusion in solid tumors of the abdomen. CT perfusion has shown promising results in serving as a noninvasive method of predicting response to therapy in cancer patients. CT perfusion parameters have also been found to correlate with immunohistologic markers of angiogenesis in a number of solid tumors, suggesting a possible role for CT perfusion as a noninvasive biomarker of tumor angiogenesis. The goals of the investigators study are twofold: first, to determine the relationship between baseline CT perfusion characteristics of rectal cancers and their response to treatment, and second, to determine if perfusion CT can be used to subsequently monitor tumor response to treatment. The investigators hope to enroll those patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing standard CT for pre-treatment planning, integrating CT perfusion imaging into the current abdomen/pelvis imaging protocol with close clinical and radiologic follow-up after treatment to determine response to therapy and time to disease progression.

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  • HepaSphere/Quadrasphere Microspheres for Delivery of Doxorubicin for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Cancer Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate overall survival in patients treated with HepaSphere/QuadraSphere compared to conventional transarterial chemoembolization with particle PVA.

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  • Ph 3 ADI-PEG 20 Versus Placebo in Subjects With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Who Have Failed Prior Systemic Therapy Recruiting

    This is a study of ADI-PEG 20 (pegylated arginine deiminase), an arginine degrading enzyme versus placebo in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who have failed prior systemic treatment (chemotherapy). Hepatocellular carcinomas have been found to require arginine, an amino acid. Thus the hypothesis is that by restricting arginine with ADI-PEG 20, the hepatocellular carcinoma cells will starve and die.

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  • A Phase 2b Study of Modified Vaccinia Virus to Treat Patients Advanced Liver Cancer Who Failed Sorafenib Not Recruiting

    This study is to determine whether JX-594 (Pexa-Vec) plus best supportive care is more effective in improving survival than best supportive care in patients with advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) who have failed sorafenib.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Fizaa Ahmed, (650) 725 - 6409.

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Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • A Phase II Study of Gefitinib, 5-Fluorouracil, Leucovorin, and Oxaliplatin in Previously Untreated Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer CLINICAL CANCER RESEARCH Fischer, G., Kuo, T., Ramsey, M., Schwartz, E., Rouse, R., Cho, C. D., Halsey, J., Sikic, B. I. 2008; 14 (21): 7074-7079

    Abstract

    We investigated the gefitinib, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), leucovorin and oxaliplatin (IFOX) regimen as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.Eligible patients had stage IV colorectal adenocarcinoma, and had not received prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease. Each cycle consisted of 14 days. Cycle 1 consisted of oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-FU (FOLFOX-4). All subsequent cycles consisted of FOLFOX-4 with gefitinib at 500 mg orally daily throughout the 14-day cycle.Forty-five patients were enrolled and were assessable for toxicity. Forty-three patients were assessable for response. Thirty-one of the 43 patients (72%) had either a complete or partial response by the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Median overall survival was 20.5 months. Median time to progression was 9.3 months. Commonly encountered grade 3 or 4 toxicities included diarrhea in 67% of patients and neutropenia in 60%. Grade 2 acneiform skin rash typical of gefitinib occurred in 60% of patients.IFOX is an active first-line regimen in patients with metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma, showing higher response rates but also increased toxicities compared with FOLFOX-4 alone in a similar patient population.

    View details for DOI 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-08-1014

    View details for Web of Science ID 000260732200044

    View details for PubMedID 18981005

  • Phase I study of stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS Koong, A. C., Le, Q. T., Ho, A., Fong, B., Fisher, G., Cho, C., Ford, J., Poen, J., Gibbs, I. C., Mehta, V. K., Kee, S., Trueblood, W., Yang, G., Bastidas, J. A. 2004; 58 (4): 1017-1021

    Abstract

    To determine the feasibility and toxicity of delivering stereotactic radiosurgery to patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.Patients with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status < or=2 and locally advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled on this Phase I dose escalation study. Patients received a single fraction of radiosurgery consisting of either 15 Gy, 20 Gy, or 25 Gy to the primary tumor. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Response to treatment was determined by serial high-resolution computed tomography scanning.Fifteen patients were treated at 3 dose levels (3 patients received 15 Gy, 5 patients received 20 Gy, and 7 patients received 25 Gy). At these doses, no Grade 3 or higher acute gastrointestinal toxicity was observed. This trial was stopped before any dose-limiting toxicity was reached, because the clinical objective of local control was achieved in all 6 evaluable patients treated at 25 Gy.It is feasible to deliver stereotactic radiosurgery to patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The recommended dose to achieve local control without significant acute gastrointestinal toxicity is 25 Gy.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2003.11.004

    View details for Web of Science ID 000220084200001

    View details for PubMedID 15001240

  • Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of BMS-188797, a new taxane analog, administered on a weekly schedule in patients with advanced malignancies CLINICAL CANCER RESEARCH Advani, R., Fisher, G. A., Lum, B. L., Jambalos, C., Cho, C. D., Cohen, M., Gollerkeri, A., Sikic, B. I. 2003; 9 (14): 5187-5194

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), and preliminary activity of BMS-188797 administered weekly.Patients with advanced malignancies were treated with escalating doses of BMS-188797 on a weekly schedule as a 1-h i.v. infusion. Plasma sampling was performed to characterize the pharmacokinetics of BMS-188797.Eighteen patients with advanced malignancies were enrolled at three dose levels ranging from 35 to 65 mg/m(2). The number of patients evaluated at each dose level was as follows: 35 mg/m(2) (n = 3); 50 mg/m(2) (n = 9); and 65 mg/m(2) (n = 6). At 65 mg/m(2), three of six patients had a DLT (one had grade 4 neutropenia lasting >7 days, and two had grade 3 diarrhea). Expansion of the 50-mg/m(2) dose cohort to nine patients established this dose as the MTD, with one patient experiencing a DLT (grade 4 neutropenia with fever). Two partial responses were observed (lung cancer, 7+ months; ovarian cancer, 6+ months durations), as well as two minor responses (esophageal cancer, 5 months; ovarian cancer, 5 months). Both patients with partial responses had been clinically resistant to paclitaxel. Plasma pharmacokinetic mean values of maximum concentration (C(max)) and area under the curve (AUC(0-48)) increased in a dose-dependent manner within the range of doses used in this study, and in three of four patients, the DLTs correlated with AUC.The MTD and the recommended Phase II dose of weekly BMS-188797 is 50 mg/m(2). The drug demonstrates antitumor activity in taxane-refractory solid tumors and is now being evaluated in combination with carboplatin.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000186558400017

    View details for PubMedID 14613998

  • Phase II trial of preoperative 3D conformal radiotherapy, protracted venous infusion 5-fluorouracil, and weekly CPT-11, followed by surgery for ultrasound-staged T3 rectal cancer INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS Mehta, V. K., Cho, C., Ford, J. M., Jambalos, C., Poen, J., Koong, A., Lin, A., Bastidas, J. A., Young, H., Dunphy, E. P., Fisher, G. 2003; 55 (1): 132-137

    Abstract

    CPT-11 sensitizes tumor cells to radiation and in combination therapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) results in enhanced cytotoxicity to metastatic colorectal cancer. We report the results from a Phase II trial of preoperative radiotherapy (RT), CPT-11, and 5-FU for patients with ultrasound-staged T3 rectal cancer.Between April 1999 and August 2001, 32 patients (21 men, 11 women; median age 52 years, range 40-74) with biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the rectum were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent endorectal ultrasonography for staging (uT3N0 = 19; uT3N1 = 13; uT2N1 = 1). RT was prescribed to the draining lymph nodes (45 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions) and tumor (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions). Patients also received concurrent CPT-11 (50 mg/m(2), Days 1, 8, 15, and 22) and 5-FU (200 mg/m(2) daily, 7 d/wk, Days 1-33). Surgical resection was performed 6-10 weeks after completing chemoradiotherapy.Acute toxicity was frequently observed, and 18 patients (56%) required either a chemotherapy dose reduction or RT interruption of >3 days. One patient withdrew because of diarrhea and abdominal cramping (Grade III) after 10 days of treatment. Although no Grade IV toxicity was observed, Grade III diarrhea (n = 9, 28%), mucositis (n = 7, 21%), rectal sores (n = 7, 21%), abdominal cramping (n = 3, 9%) were noted. Of the 32 patients who underwent surgery, 12 had a complete pathologic response. Of the 32 patients, the disease of 23 (71%) was downstaged. The average length of hospitalization was between 5 and 12 days, with 1 patient staying 33 days. All patients were followed for disease-free survival.Although associated with frequent acute toxicity, the regimen is associated with significant tumor "downstaging." Additional patients and longer follow-up are necessary to define the role of this regimen fully.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000181070600018

    View details for PubMedID 12504045

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