Bio

Academic Appointments


Honors & Awards


  • Special Fellow, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (2013-2016)
  • Fellow Basic Research Scholar, American Society of Hematology (2013-2015)
  • Translational Research Training in Hematology, American Society of Hematology-European Hematology Association (2013)
  • Advanced Residency Traiining Program, Stanford (2011-present)
  • Fellowship for Medical Students Continued Support Award, HHMI (2003-2005)
  • Cloister Scholar, HHMI-NIH (2002-2003)

Membership Organizations


  • Children's Oncology Group, Associate Member
  • American Academy of Pediatrics, Fellow
  • American Society of Hematology, Associate Member

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, American Board of Pediatrics
  • Fellowship:Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford (2012) CA
  • Residency:UCLA (2009) CA
  • Medical Education:University of Arizona College of Medicine (2006) AZ

Stanford Advisors


Research & Scholarship

Lab Affiliations


Teaching

Graduate and Fellowship Programs


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Massive evolution of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in children with B precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia BLOOD Gawad, C., Pepin, F., Carlton, V. E., Klinger, M., Logan, A. C., Miklos, D. B., Faham, M., Dahl, G., Lacayo, N. 2012; 120 (22): 4407-4417

    Abstract

    The ability to distinguish clonal B-cell populations based on the sequence of their rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus is an important tool for diagnosing B-cell neoplasms and monitoring treatment response. Leukemic precursor B cells may continue to undergo recombination of the IgH gene after malignant transformation; however, the magnitude of evolution at the IgH locus is currently unknown. We used next-generation sequencing to characterize the repertoire of IgH sequences in diagnostic samples of 51 children with B precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). We identified clonal IgH rearrangements in 43 of 51 (84%) cases and found that the number of evolved IgH sequences per patient ranged dramatically from 0 to 4024. We demonstrate that the evolved IgH sequences are not the result of amplification artifacts and are unique to leukemic precursor B cells. In addition, the evolution often follows an allelic exclusion pattern, where only 1 of 2 rearranged IgH loci exhibit ongoing recombination. Thus, precursor B-cell leukemias maintain evolution at the IgH locus at levels that were previously underappreciated. This finding sheds light on the mechanisms associated with leukemic clonal evolution and may fundamentally change approaches for monitoring minimal residual disease burden.

    View details for DOI 10.1182/blood-2012-05-429811

    View details for Web of Science ID 000313111300023

    View details for PubMedID 22932801

  • Circular RNAs Are the Predominant Transcript Isoform from Hundreds of Human Genes in Diverse Cell Types PLOS ONE Salzman, J., Gawad, C., Wang, P. L., Lacayo, N., Brown, P. O. 2012; 7 (2)

    Abstract

    Most human pre-mRNAs are spliced into linear molecules that retain the exon order defined by the genomic sequence. By deep sequencing of RNA from a variety of normal and malignant human cells, we found RNA transcripts from many human genes in which the exons were arranged in a non-canonical order. Statistical estimates and biochemical assays provided strong evidence that a substantial fraction of the spliced transcripts from hundreds of genes are circular RNAs. Our results suggest that a non-canonical mode of RNA splicing, resulting in a circular RNA isoform, is a general feature of the gene expression program in human cells.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0030733

    View details for Web of Science ID 000301977500016

    View details for PubMedID 22319583

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