Bio

Bio


Dr. Pan is a board-certified ophthalmologist and fellowship-trained vitreoretinal surgeon. She focuses on retinal vascular diseases, macular degeneration, and surgical repair of retinal detachments, macular pathology, and complications from cataract surgery. She has co-authored peer-reviweed articles on topics ranging from optical coherence tomography imaging to embryonic stem cells for macular degeneration.

In addition to her clinical practice, she is dedicated to the education and training of medical students, residents, and fellows. As recognition of her efforts, she received the Faculty Teaching Award in 2016 from the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University.

Dr. Pan's clinical practice is mainly based at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, where she serves as chief of the retina service.

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Director of Outreach Services, Stanford University, Department of Ophthalmology, Retina Division (2017 - Present)
  • Director, Retinal Imaging Conference, Stanford University, Department of Ophthalmology (2013 - Present)
  • Chief, Vitreoretinal Diseases and Surgery, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (2013 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Faculty Teaching Award, Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University (2016)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Special Projects Committee, Retina/Uveitis representative, America Academy of Ophthalmology (2015 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Fellowship, University of California Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Jules Stein Eye Institute, Vitreoretinal Diseases and Surgery (2013)
  • Residency, University of Colorado, Department of Ophthalmology, Ophthalmology (2011)
  • Internship, The Jewish Hospital of Cincinnati, Internal Medicine (2008)
  • M.D., Wayne State University School of Medicine (2007)
  • B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Chemical Engineering (2003)

Publications

All Publications


  • SMARTPHONE-BASED DILATED FUNDUS PHOTOGRAPHY AND NEAR VISUAL ACUITY TESTING AS INEXPENSIVE SCREENING TOOLS TO DETECT REFERRAL WARRANTED DIABETIC EYE DISEASE RETINA-THE JOURNAL OF RETINAL AND VITREOUS DISEASES Toy, B. C., Myung, D. J., He, L., Pan, C. K., Chang, R. T., Polkinhorne, A., Merrell, D., Foster, D., Blumenkranz, M. S. 2016; 36 (5): 1000-1008

    Abstract

    To compare clinical assessment of diabetic eye disease by standard dilated examination with data gathered using a smartphone-based store-and-forward teleophthalmology platform.100 eyes of 50 adult patients with diabetes from a health care safety-net ophthalmology clinic. All patients underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examination. Concurrently, a smartphone was used to estimate near visual acuity and capture anterior and dilated posterior segment photographs, which underwent masked, standardized review. Quantitative comparison of clinic and smartphone-based data using descriptive, kappa, Bland-Altman, and receiver operating characteristic analyses was performed.Smartphone visual acuity was successfully measured in all eyes. Anterior and posterior segment photography was of sufficient quality to grade in 96 and 98 eyes, respectively. There was good correlation between clinical Snellen and smartphone visual acuity measurements (rho = 0.91). Smartphone-acquired fundus photographs demonstrated 91% sensitivity and 99% specificity to detect moderate nonproliferative and worse diabetic retinopathy, with good agreement between clinic and photograph grades (kappa = 0.91 ± 0.1, P < 0.001; AUROC = 0.97, 95% confidence interval, 0.93-1).The authors report a smartphone-based telemedicine system that demonstrated sensitivity and specificity to detect referral-warranted diabetic eye disease as a proof-of-concept. Additional studies are warranted to evaluate this approach to expanding screening for diabetic retinopathy.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000375482100029

    View details for PubMedID 26807627

  • Comparison of Long-Acting Bevacizumab Formulations in the Treatment of Choroidal Neovascularization in a Rat Model JOURNAL OF OCULAR PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS Pan, C. K., Durairaj, C., Kompella, U. B., Agwu, O., Oliver, S. C., Quiroz-Mercado, H., Mandava, N., Olson, J. L. 2011; 27 (3): 219-224

    Abstract

    The objective of this study was to compare the reduction in size of experimentally induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in rat eyes treated with bevacizumab, poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG)-bevacizumab conjugate (b-PEG), and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-encapsulated bevacizumab (b-PLGA).Forty-eight eyes from 24 rats were divided into 4 groups of 12 eyes. In each group, 3 eyes were assigned to a treatment subgroup, each receiving a different injection-control, bevacizumab, b-PEG, and b-PLGA. In all eyes, laser photocoagulation was used to rupture Bruch's membrane. In group 1, laser was followed by injection, which was then followed by harvesting the rats to assess the CNV area. All 3 steps were separated by a 2-week interval. In groups 2, 3, and 4, injection preceded laser photocoagulation by a variable interval and all rats were harvested 2 weeks postlaser treatment. In group 2, laser and injection were separated by 2 weeks. In group 3, laser followed injection by 4 weeks. In group 4, laser followed injection by 6 weeks. The CNV area was measured for each subgroup and compared against its control. Pairwise comparisons were conducted to assess for statistically significant differences between subgroups.All subgroups in groups 1, 2, and 4 showed statistically significant reduction of CNV area (P<0.05). In group 3, the b-PEG and b-PLGA subgroups showed a 9.0% (P=0.384) and 20.3% (P=0.077) reduction in CNV area versus control, whereas there was no reduction in CNV area in the bevacizumab subgroup. However, this was not found to be statistically significant. In group 4, b-PEG was more effective than bevacizumab and b-PLGA.The reduction in CNV area in all treatment subgroups, with the exception of those in group 3, suggests successful creation of the 2 bevacizumab formulations while retaining its active antiangiogenic properties. Further studies varying in dosages and timing of injection and laser are needed to evaluate the formulations' long-acting efficacy.

    View details for DOI 10.1089/jop.2010.0158

    View details for Web of Science ID 000291470700002

    View details for PubMedID 21574814