Clinical Focus

  • Hospital-based Pediatrics
  • Children with Complex Medical Conditions
  • Medical Education
  • Pediatrics

Academic Appointments

  • Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

Administrative Appointments

  • Pediatric Hospital Medicine Fellowship Co-Director, Stanford University (2012 - Present)
  • Associate Residency Director for Advising and Coaching, Pediatric Residency Program (2012 - Present)

Honors & Awards

  • Rathmann Fellowship in Medical Education, Stanford University (2013-2014)
  • Letter of Teaching Distinction, Stanford Pediatric Clerkship (2012-2013)
  • Rotation of the Year Award, Stanford Pediatric Residency (June 2013)
  • Honor Roll for Teaching, Stanford Pediatric Clerkship (2011-2012)
  • ROSE Award for Recognition of Service Excellence, LPCH (August 2011)
  • ROSE Award for Recognition of Service Excellence, LPCH (March 2011)

Professional Education

  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2006)
  • Medical Education:Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (2003) NY
  • Residency:Children's National Medical Center (2007) DC
  • Internship:Children's National Medical Center (2004) DC
  • Residency:Children's National Medical Center (2006) DC

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests

1) Medical education research looking at assessment of pediatric residents using a coaching program.
2) Medical education research in the area of design of a complex care curriculum.
2) LPCH Physician Lead for the Pediatric Hospital Medicine Discharge Communication Collaborative which seeks to improve communication between pediatric hospitalists and primary care providers at hospital discharge.


2014-15 Courses


All Publications

  • Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Educational Intervention to Train Pediatric Residents on Caring for Children With Special Health Care Needs CLINICAL PEDIATRICS Bogetz, J. F., Gabhart, J. M., Rassbach, C. E., Sanders, L. M., Mendoza, F. S., Bergman, D. A., Blankenburg, R. L. 2015; 54 (7): 659-666


    Objective. To evaluate an innovative curriculum meeting new pediatric residency education guidelines, Special Care Optimization for Patients and Education (SCOPE). Methods. Residents were randomized to intervention (n = 23) or control (n = 25) groups. Intervention residents participated in SCOPE, pairing them with a child with special health care needs (CSHCN) and faculty mentor to make a home visit, complete care coordination toolkits, and participate in case discussions. The primary outcome was resident self-efficacy in nine skills in caring for CSHCN. Secondary outcomes included curriculum feasibility/acceptance, resident attitudes, and family satisfaction. Results. Response rates were ≥65%. Intervention residents improved in their self-efficacy for setting patient-centered goals compared with controls (mean change on 4-point Likert-type scale, 1.36 vs 0.56, P < .05). SCOPE was feasible/acceptable, residents had improved attitudes toward CSHCN, and families reported high satisfaction. Conclusion. SCOPE may serve as a model for efforts to increase residents' self-efficacy in their care of patients with chronic disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0009922814564050

    View details for Web of Science ID 000354656600008

    View details for PubMedID 25561698

  • Continuing education needs of pediatricians across diverse specialties caring for children with medical complexity. Clinical pediatrics Bogetz, J. F., Bogetz, A. L., Gabhart, J. M., Bergman, D. A., Blankenburg, R. L., Rassbach, C. E. 2015; 54 (3): 222-227


    Objective. Care for children with medical complexity (CMC) relies on pediatricians who often are ill equipped, but striving to provide high quality care. We performed a needs assessment of pediatricians across diverse subspecialties at a tertiary academic US children's hospital about their continuing education needs regarding the care of CMC. Methods. Eighteen pediatricians from diverse subspecialties were asked to complete an online anonymous open-ended survey. Data were analyzed using modified grounded theory. Results. The response rate was 89% (n = 16). Of participants, 31.2% (n = 5) were general pediatricians, 18.7% (n = 3) were hospitalists, and 50% (n = 8) were pediatric subspecialists. Pediatricians recognized the need for skills in care coordination, giving bad news, working in interprofessional teams, and setting goals of care with patients. Conclusions. Practicing pediatricians need skills to improve care for CMC. Strategically incorporating basic palliative care education may fill an important training need across diverse pediatric specialties.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0009922814564049

    View details for PubMedID 25561699

  • Pediatric primary care providers' perspectives regarding hospital discharge communication: a mixed methods analysis. Academic pediatrics Leyenaar, J. K., Bergert, L., Mallory, L. A., Engel, R., Rassbach, C., Shen, M., Woehrlen, T., Cooperberg, D., Coghlin, D. 2015; 15 (1): 61-68


    Effective communication between inpatient and outpatient providers may mitigate risks of adverse events associated with hospital discharge. However, there is an absence of pediatric literature defining effective discharge communication strategies at both freestanding children's hospitals and general hospitals. The objectives of this study were to assess associations between pediatric primary care providers' (PCPs) reported receipt of discharge communication and referral hospital type, and to describe PCPs' perspectives regarding effective discharge communication and areas for improvement.We administered a questionnaire to PCPs referring to 16 pediatric hospital medicine programs nationally. Multivariable models were developed to assess associations between referral hospital type and receipt and completeness of discharge communication. Open-ended questions asked respondents to describe effective strategies and areas requiring improvement regarding discharge communication. Conventional qualitative content analysis was performed to identify emergent themes.Responses were received from 201 PCPs, for a response rate of 63%. Although there were no differences between referral hospital type and PCP-reported receipt of discharge communication (relative risk 1.61, 95% confidence interval 0.97-2.67), PCPs referring to general hospitals more frequently reported completeness of discharge communication relative to those referring to freestanding children's hospitals (relative risk 1.78, 95% confidence interval 1.26-2.51). Analysis of free text responses yielded 4 major themes: 1) structured discharge communication, 2) direct personal communication, 3) reliability and timeliness of communication, and 4) communication for effective postdischarge care.This study highlights potential differences in the experiences of PCPs referring to general hospitals and freestanding children's hospitals, and presents valuable contextual data for future quality improvement initiatives.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.acap.2014.07.004

    View details for PubMedID 25444655

  • Caring for Children With Medical Complexity: Challenges and Educational Opportunities Identified by Pediatric Residents. Academic pediatrics Bogetz, J. F., Bogetz, A. L., Rassbach, C. E., Gabhart, J. M., Blankenburg, R. L. 2015


    High-quality care for children with medical complexity (CMC) is in its infancy. Residents have the opportunity to view care for CMC with a fresh perspective that is informed by their work across diverse health care settings and significant time spent at the bedside. This study aimed to identify the challenges and potential solutions for complex care delivery and education from their perspectives.We conducted three 60-minute focus groups with a purposeful sample of residents and recent graduates at a US tertiary-care medical center. Data were transcribed verbatim, and themes were identified using an iterative approach and modified grounded theory.Sixteen participants identified 4 major challenges to caring for CMC: 1) lack of care coordination; 2) complex technology management; 3) patients' pervasive psychosocial needs; and 4) lack of effective health care provider training. Participants identified 3 solutions: 1) greater integration of primary care providers; 2) attention to psychosocial needs through shared decision making; and 3) integration of longitudinal patient relationships into provider training. We found that residents who experienced longitudinal relationships with CMC felt more efficacious and better equipped to handle challenges of caring for CMC as a result of their broader understanding of patients' priorities and of their role as providers.Residents recognize important challenges and offer thoughtful solutions to caring for CMC. Although multiple solutions exist, formal integration of longitudinal patient experiences into residency training may better prepare residents to understand patient priorities and identify when their own attitudinal changes can guide them into more efficacious roles as providers.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.acap.2015.08.004

    View details for PubMedID 26409304

  • Training Health Care Professionals for 21st-Century Practice: A Systematic Review of Educational Interventions on Chronic Care. Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges Bogetz, J. F., Rassbach, C. E., Bereknyei, S., Mendoza, F. S., Sanders, L. M., Braddock, C. H. 2015


    To systematically review the evidence for high-quality and effective educational strategies to train health care professionals across the education continuum on chronic disease care.A search of English-language publications and conference proceedings was performed in November 2013 and updated in April 2014. Studies that evaluated a newly developed curriculum targeting chronic disease care with learner outcomes were included. Two primary reviewers and one adjudicating reviewer evaluated the studies and assessed their quality using the validated Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). Studies were also mapped onto elements of Wagner's chronic care model (CCM) to evaluate their use of established evidence-based models for chronic care delivery. Miller's classification of clinical competence was used to assess the quality of learner achievements for each educational intervention.A total of 672 articles were found for this review. Twenty-two met criteria for data extraction. The majority of studies were of moderate quality according to MERSQI scoring. Only three studies reported both learner and patient outcomes. The highest-quality studies incorporated more elements of Wagner's CCM and showed high-level learner competence according to Miller's classification. Successful interventions redesigned health care delivery systems to include team-based care, emphasized training of health care professionals on patient self-management, and included learner-based quality improvement initiatives.The growing number of children and adults with chronic disease necessitates improved educational interventions for health care professionals that involve evidence-based models for restructuring chronic care delivery, aim for high-level learner behavioral outcomes, and evolve through quality improvement initiatives.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/ACM.0000000000000773

    View details for PubMedID 26039140

  • Pediatric discharge content: a multisite assessment of physician preferences and experiences. Hospital pediatrics Coghlin, D. T., Leyenaar, J. K., Shen, M., Bergert, L., Engel, R., Hershey, D., Mallory, L., Rassbach, C., Woehrlen, T., Cooperberg, D. 2014; 4 (1): 9-15


    Professional medical societies endorse prompt, consistent discharge communication to primary care providers (PCPs) on discharge. However, evidence is limited about what clinical elements to communicate. Our main goal was to identify and compare the clinical elements considered by PCPs and pediatric hospitalists to be essential to communicate to PCPs within 2 days of pediatric hospital discharge. A secondary goal was to describe experiences of the PCPs and pediatric hospitalists regarding sending and receiving discharge information.A survey of physician preferences and experiences regarding discharge communication was sent to 320 PCPs who refer patients to 16 hospitals, with an analogous survey sent to 147 hospitalists. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and χ(2) analyses were performed.A total of 201 PCPs (63%) and 71 hospitalists (48%) responded to the survey. Seven clinical elements were reported as essential by >75% of both PCPs and hospitalists: dates of admission and discharge; discharge diagnoses; brief hospital course; discharge medications; immunizations given during hospitalization; pending laboratory or test results; and follow-up appointments. PCPs reported reliably receiving discharge communication significantly less often than hospitalists reported sending it (71.8% vs 85.1%; P < .01), and PCPs considered this communication to be complete significantly less often than hospitalists did (64.9% vs 79.1%; P < .01).We identified 7 core clinical elements that PCPs and hospitalists consider essential in discharge communication. Consistently and promptly communicating at least these core elements after discharge may enhance PCP satisfaction and patient-level outcomes. Reported rates of transmission and receipt of this information were suboptimal and should be targeted for improvement.

    View details for DOI 10.1542/hpeds.2013-0022

    View details for PubMedID 24435595

  • Special Care Optimization for Patients and Education (SCOPE): Training Pediatric Residents About Children With Special Health Care Needs. Available from: MedEdPORTAL Bogetz, J., Gabhart, J., Rassbach, C., Sanders, L., Mendoza, F., Bergman, D., Blankenburg, R. 2013
  • A 6-Year-Old Girl with Extensive Bullous Skin Lesions PEDIATRIC ANNALS Rassbach, C., Shah, N., Davis, A. 2012; 41 (6): 229-231

    View details for DOI 10.3928/00904481-20120525-05

    View details for Web of Science ID 000306363600012

    View details for PubMedID 22694233

  • A boy with fever and vomiting. Infectious Diseases in Children. Rassbach C, Jantausch B 2008; August
  • Streptococcal pyomyositis of the psoas - Case reports and review PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY CARE Kern, L., Rassbach, C., OTTOLINI, M. 2006; 22 (4): 250-253


    We present two unusual cases of pyomyositis of the psoas muscle caused by Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) in children presenting with fever, emesis and leg pain. Pyomyositis secondary to GABHS is rare in children and cases involving the psoas muscle have not been previously reported. In our discussion, we review the epidemiology, presentation, diagnosis and treatment of GABHS psoas myositis in comparison with staphylococcal pyomyositis. Prompt recognition of the signs and symptoms of GABHS psoas pyomyositis is essential for treatment of this life-threatening infection.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000237260600010

    View details for PubMedID 16651916

  • Lyme disease, a review. Infectious Diseases in Children. Rassbach C, Jantausch B 2006; February

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