School of Medicine


Showing 81-90 of 314 Results

  • Alin Lucian Girnita

    Alin Lucian Girnita

    Clinical Professor, Pathology

    Bio Dr. Alin Girnita received his MD/PhD degrees from the University of Medicine in Craiova, Romania, where he was board certified in cardiovascular surgery. He completed his fellowship in transplantation immunology, histocompatibility and immunogenetics at the University of Pittsburgh Medical center, where he was appointed as Assistant Professor of Pathology and Associate Director of HLA lab. Between 2009-2019, Dr. Girnita was an Associate Professor, and then Professor of Surgery and Director of Transplant Immunology Division at University of Cincinnati. Since November 2019, he was recruited as a Professor of Pathology at Stanford School of Medicine. Dr. Girnita has authored over 40 scientific articles that have been cited over 1500 times. His research interest involves the alloimmune response in solid-organ transplantation, markers of antibody-mediated rejection, influence of various therapeutic protocols on desensitization and alloimmune response, structural matching and genetic polymorphism in transplantation.

  • Alex Gitlin

    Alex Gitlin

    Instructor, Pathology

    Bio Alex Gitlin, M.D., Ph.D. is currently an Instructor in the Department of Pathology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Prior to Stanford, Alex received his M.D. from Weill Cornell Medicine (2017) and his Ph.D. from Rockefeller University (2016) as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) at the Tri-Institutional M.D.-Ph.D. program. During his graduate training, Alex worked on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying germinal center reactions and the formation of long-lived humoral immunity. His work elucidated the mechanisms by which CD4+ T cells induce selective clonal expansion of germinal center B cells during the immune response. Currently, Alex's clinical and research interests lie in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which the innate immune system mounts inflammatory responses that are commensurate with the threat level posed to the host.

  • Matthew Gologorsky

    Matthew Gologorsky

    Research Assistant, Pathology Sponsored Projects

    Bio Matthew received his B.S. in Neuroscience from the University of Michigan in 2018. There, he worked in the lab of Dr. Paul Jenkins exploring the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neuropsychiatric disease. Matthew joined the Howitt lab at Stanford in the fall of 2018, where he is studying how intestinal tuft cells coordinate the activity of the gut epithelium, immune system, and enteric nervous system to mount effective defense mechanisms against intestinal parasites.

  • Dita Gratzinger

    Dita Gratzinger

    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have research interests in the interaction of hematolymphoid neoplasia with the microenvironment. For example, I use a combination of immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and image analysis techniques to evaluate the mesenchymal stromal cell compartment in myelodysplastic syndrome (pre-leukemic bone marrow failure disorder). I also have interests in lymphoma vasculature and the tropism of lymphoma for specific types of vasculature.

  • Dr Husein Hadeiba

    Dr Husein Hadeiba

    Affiliate, Pathology VA Faculty PTAs

    Bio My research interests center on understanding how dendritic cells (DCs) regulate the immune response. Specifically we are interested in the role of DC trafficking in inflammation and in the maintenance of immune homeostasis and tolerance. To understand these processes, we are examining the mechanisms of DC homing to sites of immune tolerance such as (i) the thymus-the site of central tolerance, and (ii) the gut mucosa-where immune responses to commensal and ingested antigens (Ags) are shut down. We are also interested in understanding how microenvironmental tissue factors influence DC development and their ability to imprint unique homing properties on T cells. DCs are unique messenger white blood cells of the mammalian immune system. They function as specialized antigen-presenting cells (APCs), whose main function is to process and transport Ags and microenvironmental signals from the tissues to the draining lymph nodes for presentation to T cells. In the last decade, a large number of DC subsets have been characterized in part defined by their expression of unique trafficking and adhesion receptors, and migratory properties. We therefore would like to understand how these trafficking and adhesion receptors define their function and phenotype and how they are regulated by the tissue microenvironment, with the hope of targeting unique DC subsets to suppress chronic inflammation or to improve anti-tumor responses in immunotherapy.

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