School of Medicine


Showing 41-50 of 50 Results

  • David Solow-Cordero

    David Solow-Cordero

    Director, HTBC, Chemical and Systems Biology Operations

    Current Role at Stanford Director, High-Throughput Bioscience Center

    The High-Throughput Bioscience Center's mission is to provide researchers at Stanford with the ability to run high-throughput chemical, siRNA, cDNA, and high-content screens for the purpose of drug and/or target discovery. The HTBC is a Stanford University School of Medicine core facility and was created in 2003 by the Department of Chemical and Systems Biology (formerly Molecular Pharmacology). The HTBC is a shared resource (Bioscience Screening Facility) for the Stanford Cancer Institute (more info), the Digestive Disease Center (Chemical Genomics Core), and the NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award (Spectrum).

    Research approaches that were previously done exclusively in industry are now being used in academia to advance basic research. This high-throughput screening (HTS) laboratory allows Stanford researchers and others to discover novel modulators of targets that otherwise would not be practical in industry. The center incorporates instrumentation (purchased with NCRR NIH Instrumentation grant numbers S10RR019513 and S10RR026338), databases, compound libraries, and personnel whose previous sole domains were in industry. Among our instrumentation are a Molecular Devices ImageXpress Micro High-Content fluorescence microplate imager, with live cell and phase contrast/brightfield options, a Caliper Life Sciences SciClone ALH3000 and an Agilent Bravo microplate liquid handler, and the Molecular Devices Analyst GT and FlexStation II 384 and Tecan Infinite M1000 PRO fluorescence, luminescence and absorbance multimode microplate readers. We have over 135,000 small molecules for compound screens, 15,000 cDNAs for genomic screens, and the siARRAY whole human genome siRNA library from ThermoFisher Scientific (formerly Dharmacon) targeting 21,000 genes.

    The HTBC is located in CCSR Room 0133-North Wing, between the Transgenic Mouse Facility, the Immune Monitoring Core, and the Stanford Functional Genomics Facility.

  • Mehlika Toy

    Mehlika Toy

    Basic Life Res Scientist, Surgery - General Surgery

    Current Role at Stanford My current duties as a Research Scientist at Stanford University include developing cost-effectiveness models to estimate clinical outcomes and program costs to inform health policy. Recently, I was commissioned by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine to model the potential impact of improving chronic hepatitis B patient care and treatment in the United States. The study published by the National Academies formed the basis of a national strategy which concluded that eliminating the public health problem of CHB in the US by 2030 is feasible through strategies including linkage to care for monitoring and treatment to reduce disease complications. Subsequently, I was invited by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to give a talk on the national hepatitis B model at the viral hepatitis summit in Atlanta.

  • Stephanie Van de Ven

    Stephanie Van de Ven

    Deputy Director, Canary Center at Stanford, Rad/Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection

    Bio As Deputy Director of the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection I broadly oversee its operations and research programs. The Canary Center is focused on developing in vitro and in vivo tools for early cancer detection and its research spans the areas of biomarker discovery, development of molecular imaging agents, development of new diagnostic and imaging devices, and mathematical modeling. In my position I facilitate the clinical translation of cancer diagnostic tools and I enable innovative interdisciplinary research. My research expertise includes leading phase I-II clinical trials to evaluate a newly developed optical breast imaging system in combination with a novel imaging agent. I gained valuable experience in clinical translation of medical devices and in testing new imaging agents for the first time in patients. My training as a Radiology resident was instrumental in my decision to focus on cancer early detection research, because it clearly confronted me with the problem that most cancer patients are being diagnosed too late. I expanded my knowledge on biomarker research by developing proteomics assays during my postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford, in conjunction with my continued work in optical and photoacoustic molecular imaging. In my current role, I work with the faculty of the Canary Center and the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, and am committed to advancing cancer research by applying my medical training, clinical knowledge, and research expertise to managing collaborative programs and contribute to the success of the Center and its faculty.