School of Medicine


Showing 41-52 of 52 Results

  • Eila C. Skinner

    Eila C. Skinner

    Thomas A. Stamey Research Professor in Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on outcomes in the treatment of muscle invasive and high-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. This includes identifying markers of prognosis, predictive markers for response to surgery and chemotherapy, and working toward an individualized, multidisciplinary approach to disease management. I have also focused on optimizing the use of lower urinary tract reconstruction in patients undergoing cystectomy, and developing interventions to improve patient quality of life.

  • Sheri Spunt

    Sheri Spunt

    Endowed Professor of Pediatric Cancer

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses primarily on the management of children, adolescents, and young adults with soft tissue sarcomas. I also have an interest in developmental therapeutics and late effects of cancer therapy,

  • Sandy┬áSrinivas

    Sandy Srinivas

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical interests: general oncology, genito-urinary malignancy Research interests: conducting clinical trials in advanced prostate cancer, bladder cancer and renal cell carcinoma

  • Tanya Stoyanova

    Tanya Stoyanova

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on understanding fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development. Currently, we study signaling cascades initiated by cell surface receptors which are involved in: 1) the early event of prostate cancer initiation and 2) regulation of the transition from indolent to metastatic disease. The long term goal of our laboratory is to improve the stratification of indolent from aggressive prostate cancer and aid the development of better therapeutic strategies for the advanced disease.

    Additionally, we are interested in understanding molecular mechanism that govern the self-renewal activity of adult stem cells and cancer stem cells. We use molecular biology techniques, cell culture based adult stem cell assays, in vivo tissue regeneration models of cancer.

  • Jean Y. Tang MD PhD

    Jean Y. Tang MD PhD

    Professor of Dermatology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on 2 main areas:

    1. Skin cancer:
    - New therapeutics to treat and prevent non-melanoma skin cancer, especially by targeting the Hedgehog signaling pathway for BCC tumors
    - Genomic analysis of drug-resistant cancers
    - Identifying risk factors for skin cancer in the Women's Health Initiative

    2. Epidermolysis Bullosa: gene therapy and protein therapy to replace defective/absent Collagen 7 in children and adults with Recessive Dystrophic EB

  • Melinda L. Telli, M.D.

    Melinda L. Telli, M.D.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the development of novel therapies for the treatment of triple-negative and hereditary cancer. Other areas of interest include prevention of cardiac damage associated with breast cancer treatment and cardiotoxicity of anti-cancer agents.

  • Reena Thomas

    Reena Thomas

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Reena Thomas received her medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC and her PhD from the City of Hope Graduate School in Duarte, California. She completed her training as a resident in Neurology as well as her fellowship training in Neuro-Oncology at Stanford University Hospital. Her research background and interests are focused on immune based cancer therapies and chemokine signaling in glioblastoma brain tumors. She has also been involved in advanced imaging studies of glioblastoma. She is the Director of the Adult Neuro Oncology Fellowship at Stanford.

  • Heather Wakelee

    Heather Wakelee

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Wakelee's research is focused on clinical trials and translational efforts in patients with lung cancer and other thoracic malignancies such as thymoma and thymic carcinoma. Other interests include translation projects in thoracic malignancies and collaborations with population scientists regarding lung cancer questions.

  • Paul Wender

    Paul Wender

    Francis W. Bergstrom Professor of Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular imaging, therapeutics, drug delivery, drug mode of action, synthesis

  • Joy Wu

    Joy Wu

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory focuses on the pathways that regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast and adipocyte lineages. We are also studying the role of osteoblasts in the hematopoietic and cancer niches in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  • Richard Zare

    Richard Zare

    Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science and Professor, by courtesy, of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research group is exploring a variety of topics that range from the basic understanding of chemical reaction dynamics to the nature of the chemical contents of single cells.

    Under thermal conditions nature seems to hide the details of how elementary reactions occur through a series of averages over reagent velocity, internal energy, impact parameter, and orientation. To discover the effects of these variables on reactivity, it is necessary to carry out studies of chemical reactions far from equilibrium in which the states of the reactants are more sharply restricted and can be varied in a controlled manner. My research group is attempting to meet this tough experimental challenge through a number of laser techniques that prepare reactants in specific quantum states and probe the quantum state distributions of the resulting products. It is our belief that such state-to-state information gives the deepest insight into the forces that operate in the breaking of old bonds and the making of new ones.

    Space does not permit a full description of these projects, and I earnestly invite correspondence. The following examples are representative:

    The simplest of all neutral bimolecular reactions is the exchange reaction H H2 -> H2 H. We are studying this system and various isotopic cousins using a tunable UV laser pulse to photodissociate HBr (DBr) and hence create fast H (D) atoms of known translational energy in the presence of H2 and/or D2 and using a laser multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer to detect the nascent molecular products in a quantum-state-specific manner by means of an imaging technique. It is expected that these product state distributions will provide a key test of the adequacy of various advanced theoretical schemes for modeling this reaction.

    Analytical efforts involve the use of capillary zone electrophoresis, two-step laser desorption laser multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We believe these methods can revolutionize trace analysis, particularly of biomolecules in cells.

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