School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 65 Results

  • Christos E. Constantinou

    Christos E. Constantinou

    Associate Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main recent interest is the application of Biomedical Engineering approaches for the clinical visualization and characterization of the static and dynamic properties of pelvic floor function. This extends to ultrasound Imaging and image processing, construction of computer models and biomechanics analysis of pelvic floor function. It is envisioned that these considerations are important constituents of the clinical evaluation of patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction and urodynamics.

  • Simon Conti

    Simon Conti

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Urology

    Bio I am a founding member of the Stanford Urolithiasis Project, where we have studied population health datasets to examine surgical outcomes and environmental risk factors in urinary stone disease. Our current focus includes socioeconomic and ethnic disparities in kidney stone disease, water quality and stone disease, pregnancy in kidney stone disease and geographical variations in kidney stones incidence and metabolic kidney stone work up. As a Clinical Assistant professor of urology and Director of the Stanford Kidney Stones center I have performed 300-400 surgeries per year for kidney stones since joining the faculty in 2015.

  • Amy D. Dobberfuhl, MD, MS

    Amy D. Dobberfuhl, MD, MS

    Instructor, Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neurourology & Voiding Dysfunction (Basic Science & Clinical Research): Animal models of voiding and pelvic floor dysfunction (mouse, rat, rabbit), molecular cell signaling inflammatory pathways, urinary incontinence, bladder outlet obstruction, urodynamics, pelvic floor ischemia and tissue mechanics

  • Christopher Stephen Elliott

    Christopher Stephen Elliott

    Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) [Scvmc], Urology - Divisions

    Bio Dr Elliott is a fellowship trained, pelvic reconstructive surgeon with expertise in neurourology. He participated in the physician-scientist program at Ohio State University, receiving both and MD as well as a PhD in epidemiology. After completing his urologic residency at Stanford University Medical Center in 2010, he became Stanford's first Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery Fellow - a unique two year ABU/ABOG accredited fellowship with both Stanford Urology and Urogynecology faculty training. During this time he received a full experience in pelvic medicine that encompassed both male and female patients. He has clinical and surgical expertise in the management of female pelvic organ prolapse, complex urogynecologic anomalies, overactive bladder, BPH, voiding dysfunction secondary to neurologic disease and both male and female incontinence.
    Starting in 2012, Dr Elliott joined the Division of Urology at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in San Jose, California with a joint appointment at Stanford University Medical Center. In addition to his clinical work, he has authored several book chapters, published multiple journal articles and taught courses at national meetings (AUA, AUGS). His main academic interests include the epidemiologic study of pelvic organ prolapse, incontinence and bladder dysfunction after spinal cord injury. Dr Elliott is currently a member of the SUFU young members committee and the Neurogenic Bladder Research Group.

    2018 publications

    1)Dallas KD, Rogo-Gupta L, Elliott CS. Where do Women Go For Revision Surgeries? Geographic Migration Patterns After Urethral Sling Placement in California. Urology Practice (2018); 5: 93-100.

    2)Dallas KB, Rogo-Gupta L, Elliott CS. What Impacts the All Cause Risk of Reoperation after Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair? A Comparison of Mesh and Native Tissue Approaches in 110,329 Women. J Urol. (2018) (epub ahead of print)

    3)Elliott CS, Dallas KB, Zlatev D, Comiter CV, Crew J, Shem K. Volitional Voiding of the Bladder Following Spinal Cord Injury: Validation of Bilateral Lower Extremity Motor Function as a Key Predictor. J Urol. (2018) epub ahead of print

    4)Stauffer CE, Snyder E, Ngo TC, Elliott CS. Is Neurogenic Bladder a Risk Factor for Febrile Urinary Tract Infection after Ureteroscopy and if so, Why? Urology (2017) epub ahead of print

    5)Zlatev DV, Shem K, Elliott CS. Predictors of long-term bladder management in spinal cord injury patients-Upper extremity function may matter most. Neurourol Urodyn. (2017) epub ahead of print

    6)Davenport MT, Sokol ER, Comiter CV, Elliott CS. Does the Degree of Cystocele Predict De Novo Stress Urinary Incontinence After Prolapse Repair? Further Analysis of the Colpopexy and Urinary Reduction Efforts Trial. Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg. (2017) epub ahead of print

  • Ekene Enemchukwu

    Ekene Enemchukwu

    Assistant Professor of Urology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Refractory overactive bladder in elderly and frail patient populations, detrusor underactivity, quality of life, patient outcomes, quality improvement, patient satisfaction, and shared decision making

  • Richard Fan

    Richard Fan

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Urology

    Bio Richard E. Fan, Ph.D., is an engineer embedded in the Department of Urology in the Stanford School of Medicine.

    Dr. Fan’s research relates to the development of clinically driven biomedical instrumentation and medical devices. He is interested in translational application of emerging technologies in the medical and surgical spaces, as well as the development of platforms to explore clinical and pre-clinical evaluation. His primary work is currently focused on image guided detection and treatment of prostate cancer, including MR-US fusion, focal therapies, embedded systems and robotics.