School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 41 Results

  • Dylan Dodd

    Dylan Dodd

    Assistant Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Harnessing the gut microbiome to treat human disease.

  • Elizabeth Egan

    Elizabeth Egan

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Malaria is a parasitic disease transmitted by mosquitos that is a leading cause of childhood mortality globally. Public health efforts to control malaria have historically been hampered by the rapid development of drug resistance. The goal of our research is to understand the molecular determinants of critical host-pathogen interactions in malaria, with a focus on the erythrocyte host cell. Our long-term goal is to develop novel approaches to prevent or treat malaria and improve child health.

  • Shirit Einav

    Shirit Einav

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our basic research program focuses on understanding the roles of virus-host interactions in viral infection and disease pathogenesis via molecular and systems virology single cell approaches. This program is combined with translational efforts to apply this knowledge for the development of broad-spectrum host-centered antiviral approaches to combat emerging viral infections, including dengue, encephalitic alphaviruses, and Ebola, and means to predict disease progression.

  • Stephen J. Galli, MD

    Stephen J. Galli, MD

    The Mary Hewitt Loveless, M.D. Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goals of Dr. Galli's laboratory are to understand the regulation of mast cell and basophil development and function, and to develop and use genetic approaches to elucidate the roles of these cells in health and disease. We study both the roles of mast cells, basophils, and IgE in normal physiology and host defense, e.g., in responses to parasites and in enhancing resistance to venoms, and also their roles in pathology, e.g., anaphylaxis, food allergy, and asthma, both in mice and humans.

  • Jeffrey S.  Glenn, M.D., Ph.D.

    Jeffrey S. Glenn, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Glenn's primary interest is in molecular virology, with a strong emphasis on translating this knowledge into novel antiviral therapies. Other interests include exploitation of hepatic stem cells, engineered human liver tissues, liver cancer, and new biodefense antiviral strategies.

  • Harry B Greenberg

    Harry B Greenberg

    Associate Dean, Research, The Joseph D. Grant Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis; determinants of protective immunity; host range and tissue tropism in liver and GI tract pathogenic viruses and studies of vaccines in people.

  • KC Huang

    KC Huang

    Professor of Bioengineering and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests How do cells determine their shape and grow?
    How do molecules inside cells get to the right place at the right time?

    Our group tries to answer these questions using a systems biology approach, in which we integrate interacting networks of protein and lipids with the physical forces determined by the spatial geometry of the cell. We use theoretical and computational techniques to make predictions that we can verify experimentally using synthetic, chemical, or genetic perturbations.

  • Juliana Idoyaga

    Juliana Idoyaga

    Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Idoyaga Lab is focused on the function and biology of dendritic cells, which are specialized antigen-presenting cells that initiate and modulate our body’s immune responses. Considering their importance in orchestrating the quality and quantity of immune responses, dendritic cells are an indisputable target for vaccines and therapies.

    Dendritic cells are not one cell type, but a network of cells comprised of many subsets or subpopulations with distinct developmental pathways and tissue localization. It is becoming apparent that each dendritic cell subset is different in its capacity to induce and modulate specific types of immune responses; however, there is still a lack of resolution and deep understanding of dendritic cell subset functional specialization. This gap in knowledge is an impediment for the rational design of immune interventions. Our research program focuses on advancing our understanding of mouse and human dendritic cell subsets, revealing their endowed capacity to induce distinct types of immune responses, and designing novel strategies to exploit them for vaccines and therapies.

  • Peter K.  Jackson

    Peter K.  Jackson

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology (Baxter Labs)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cell cycle and cyclin control of DNA replication .

  • Prasanna Jagannathan

    Prasanna Jagannathan

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Bio I am an Infectious Diseases specialist with a research program in human immunology focused on malaria-specific immune responses in pregnancy and infancy. My current research program is to further our understanding of the mechanisms of clinical immunity to malaria through field-based studies, and to better understand the immunologic consequences of malaria control interventions.

    Given the profound global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are also testing novel immune modulating therapeutics for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infected patients with mild infection (NCT 04331899). In this study 120 SARS-CoV-2 infected patients (both symptomatic and asymptomatic) are being randomized to receive Lambda vs. placebo to test the hypothesis that SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals given Lambda at the time of diagnosis have a shortened duration of viral shedding in comparison to patients given placebo. I serve as as the co-PI of this study along with Dr. Upi Singh at Stanford.

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