School of Medicine


Showing 101-150 of 150 Results

  • Linda Nguyen

    Linda Nguyen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus on disorder of gastrointestinal motility. Specifically, those related to nausea and vomiting with or without gastroparesis, irritable bowel syndrome and chronic abdominal pain. My research focuses on understanding the cause of symptoms and development of new treatments targeting either symptom control and disease modification.

  • Mindie H. Nguyen, MD, MAS, AGAF, FAASLD

    Mindie H. Nguyen, MD, MAS, AGAF, FAASLD

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Epidemiology and treatment outcomes of liver cancer focusing on screening, early diagnosis with novel markers, etiologies (viral and nonviral including NALFD).
    2. Epidemiology and treatment outcomes of chronic hepatitis B and C focusing on real-world cohorts, understudied populations, and HCV genotypes 4-6.
    3. Therapeutic clinical trials for chronic hepatitis B/C and NAFLD.
    4. Health disparities and ethnicity-related issues
    5. Global health: medical education, public health, and research

  • Tu Nguyen

    Tu Nguyen

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio Dr. Nguyen is board certified in Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He holds a clinical teaching appointment at the Stanford School of Medicine.

    Dr. Nguyen's expertise include all aspects of general gastroenterology and hepatology, but he has a particular interest in new imaging techniques in colon cancer screening, inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. Dr. Nguyen is also performing fecal microbiota transplantation (stool transplants) for patients who suffer from chronic, relapsing Clostridium difficile infection and has had over 90% cure rate.

    In his free time, he enjoys traveling, golfing, skiing, hiking, healthy cooking and spending time with his family. He enjoys the personal rapport that he is able to establish with his patients and appreciate the opportunity to help them as best that he can.

  • Philip Okafor

    Philip Okafor

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a health services researcher who studies variations in access to health care resources, including under- and overutilization of available resources to see how these inequalities impact outcomes. I utilize large database methodologies to identify novel disparities with the goal of finding solutions that will improve health equity for all.

  • Walter Park

    Walter Park

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Park's research interests are in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cysts, acute and chronic pancreatitis. His approach incorporates methods in health services research including the use of observational datasets, cost-effectiveness studies, and the development of clinical cohorts.

  • Edward Anhoa Pham

    Edward Anhoa Pham

    Postdoctoral Medical Fellow, Gastroenterology

    Bio My interest in medicine and research was triggered by my mother’s battle with chronic hepatitis C, which made me realize the transformational power of biomedical research in treating patients. Therefore, my career goal is to become a physician scientist in the field of gastroenterology and hepatology dedicated to translating discoveries in the laboratory into novel medical treatment modalities. My research focus is alterations in phosphoinositides signaling and its pathogenesis in cancers of the hepatobiliary and luminal GI tract with the goal to identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. I also have a particular interest in understanding the interface between chronic viral infection and cancer through studying how the innate and adaptive immune system are perturbed in chronic viral infections

  • Peter Poullos

    Peter Poullos

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology

    Bio Dr. Poullos is a native of Stockton California. He attended Santa Clara University where he earned his BS in Biology. He received his M.D. degree at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, after which he did Internal Medicine residency at the University of California-San Francisco, finishing in 2002. He stayed at UCSF as a Gastroenterology fellow until 2004. However, after a spinal cord injury, he decided to retrain in Radiology. He did his Radiology residency at Stanford University, where he also completed a fellowship In Body Imaging in 2009. Dr. Poullos is now faculty in both the departments of Radiology and Gastroenterology and Hepatology. His clinical practice is at the Stanford University Medical Center, where he interprets CT, MRI, and ultrasound primarily of the abdomen and pelvis. His interests include radiology of the acute abdomen, hepatobiliary imaging, and colorectal cancer screening.

    Dr. Poullos is Founder and Executive Director of the Stanford Medicine Abilities Coalition (SMAC), a group composed of people with disabilities and their allies at Stanford Medicine. He is also a member of the Radiology Department Diversity Committee, the School of Medicine Faculty Senate Subcommittee on Diversity, and the School of Medicine Diversity Cabinet.

  • Rachel Hagey Saluti

    Rachel Hagey Saluti

    Staff Research Scientist, Medicine - Med/Gastroenterology and Hepatology

    Bio My primary research focus is in translational molecular virology and drug discovery/development. My work aims to uncover and characterize novel virus targets for the rational design of new classes of antiviral therapeutics.

  • Adrish Sen

    Adrish Sen

    Affiliate, Medicine - Med/Gastroenterology and Hepatology

    Bio My research focuses on Rotavirus (RV) - the causative agent of acute infantile diarrhea, that is responsible for more than 200,000 deaths annually. My earlier work explored RV molecular epidemiology and virion assembly mechanisms. This led to the identification of novel group B rotaviruses, which cause adult diarrhea in humans and exhibit pandemic potential. I subsequently characterized molecular mechanisms by which rotaviruses assemble in infected cells - specifically how a viral non-structural protein, NSP5, forms higher-order assembly scaffolds by a calcium-triggered reversible molecular switch.
    Since moving to Stanford University, my research in Dr. Harry Greenberg’s laboratory has focused on understanding the role that innate immunity plays in determining rotavirus species barriers, pathogenicity, and shaping the overall immune response to natural and vaccine-related RV infections. Our work defined the pathways leading to RV recognition by the host interferon response and uncovered viral strategies to regulate this process. Single-cell studies have revealed that RV degrades all three major IFN type receptors in infected cells, and remarkably, also confers pleiotropic IFN resistance to RV-bystander cells (which express normal levels of IFN receptors). These viral regulatory mechanisms possibly underlie the unexpected ability of RV infection to prevent lethal endotoxemia, which we reported recently. I have a strong interest in dissecting host antiviral responses to pathogenic and attenuated viruses at the population and single-cell levels using microfluidics qRT-PCR, multi-color cytometry, and novel mass cytometry techniques. In other ongoing research, I am examining differences in cell type-specific innate responses to pathogenic and attenuated influenza viruses in the human nasal mucosa (primarily using clinical and volunteer nasal swab specimens).

  • Atulkumar T. Shah, MD

    Atulkumar T. Shah, MD

    Clinical Instructor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio Dr. Shah is a board-certified, fellowship-trained gastroenterologist with Stanford Health Care’s Digestive Health program. He is a clinical associate professor of medicine in the division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Shah treats all gastrointestinal and liver conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), colon polyps, hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. He has a special interest in the increasingly prevalent fatty liver disease, which allows him to work closely with patients to educate them about symptom management and making lifestyle changes that will improve their health and wellbeing.

    Dr. Shah treats all gastrointestinal and liver conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), colon polyps, hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. He has a special interest in the increasingly prevalent fatty liver disease, which allows him to work closely with patients to educate them about symptom management and making lifestyle changes that will improve their health and wellbeing.

    After more than two decades of practice, Dr. Shah added training in liver transplant to expand his knowledge of liver disease and offer his patients a “one-stop” resource for truly comprehensive care.

    Dr. Shah is a member of the American College of Gastroenterology, American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, and American Association for the Study of Liver Disease.

    Among Dr. Shah’s current research interests is the development of an algorithm assessing the impact of gastrointestinal disease management on readmission rates.

    Dr. Shah brings a personalized approach to working with patients and to teaching the next generation of physician scientists the classic skills of careful listening and patient examination. Throughout his career, he has emphasized the fundamental importance of balancing scientific expertise with empathy and compassion.

    As a volunteer with the non-profit organization Health Volunteers Overseas, Dr. Shah travels around the world to train physicians about liver disease management and treatment. He is director of the HVO site in Bangalore, India.

  • Edward Sheen

    Edward Sheen

    Adjunct Professor, Medicine - Med/Gastroenterology and Hepatology

    Bio Edward Sheen is Chief Medical Officer, Market Development and Solution Design at Lumeris. Lumeris is a leading value-based care delivery operator aligning and transforming health systems and payers across the country to improve population health, reduce costs of care, enhance patient experience, and strengthen care provider engagement. Through its operations, technology, change management, and strategic advisory solutions, Lumeris establishes population health services organizations and collaborative, aligned health plans to deliver accountable person-centered care.

    His experience has bridged the public, private, non-profit, and academic sectors and includes work with Stanford University, the White House, U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, California State Assembly, Kaiser Family Foundation, Blue Shield of California, California/American Medical Associations, and Genzyme, as well as advising early stage healthcare companies. In 2014 he was one of 15 Americans appointed by President Barack Obama a nonpartisan White House Fellow, and selected to be the White House Fellow to the Secretary of Defense. In this capacity, he served as a Special Assistant to the Secretary and Defense Department senior health policy advisor, and was a recipient of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Medal for Exceptional Public Service. Dr. Sheen is also Adjunct Professor of Medicine and a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is dedicated to achieving more accessible, innovative, patient-centered, and high-performing health care and bringing together teams and communities to care for vulnerable populations. He also has a long commitment to mentoring, medical education, and supporting the leadership development of future change agents.

    Dr. Sheen completed his Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology training at Stanford, received his MD from the University of California, San Francisco and earned his MBA and MPH degrees through scholarships from Stanford Graduate School of Business and Harvard School of Public Health, where he was also a Harvard Kennedy School Center for Public Leadership Zuckerman Fellow. He graduated magna cum laude from Brown University with a B.A. in Public Policy and induction to Phi Beta Kappa.

  • Sundeep Singh

    Sundeep Singh

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio After living and training throughout the country, I am excited to be part of the Stanford team. As a result of both my personal experiences and training, I am passionate about ensuring that patients receive appropriate diagnostic testing and treatment options in order to improve people's quality of life. In collaboration with my amazing colleagues, I am confident in the high quality and easily accessible care we are able to provide to patients across northern California.

    While my interest is most in inflammatory bowel disease, I am also interested in the interaction between mental health, incentives, and emerging therapies in gastroenterology.

  • Sidhartha Sinha

    Sidhartha Sinha

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests There are two primary and overlapping emphases of my research, both of which are driven and united by needs-based innovation and translational potential:

    (1) Understanding the microenvironment of the inflamed versus normal gut in order to identify better therapeutic targets for people with immune-¬mediated GI disorders. Here, our investigations include understanding the influence and interactions of pharmacologic and dietary interventions on gut microbiome/metabolomic changes and the host immune response. In the context of providing patients with new understanding and solutions for their disease, I have led and advised on the design of both pilot and large clinical trials (including new FDA approved therapies) for anti-inflammatory therapies;

    (2) Applying novel approaches and technologies (including natural language processing, computer vision, and reinforcement learning) to identify and address unmet clinical needs. In this area we have ongoing and published efforts in my lab to validate and develop solutions to pressing clinical needs. We have developed/led new drug delivery technologies with a multidisciplinary team that have shown strong potential in ongoing human IBD clinical trials. My lab has utilized both supervised and unsupervised approaches to analyze social media discourse and unstructured data sets for identifying patient needs that are rarely addressed in clinical settings. We have gained insights into patient perceptions around preventative health interventions, such as health screening and diet, including the dearth of evidence-based dietary recommendations to treat IBD (despite strong patient desire for solutions in this domain).

  • Irene Sonu

    Irene Sonu

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio I am passionate about gut health and strive to provide the best care to my patients. I specialize in complex motility disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. My areas of clinical expertise include achalasia, dysphagia, eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastroparesis, functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, and pelvic floor dysfunction. I also see patients in need of fecal microbiota transplant for recurrent C. difficile infection.

  • Sarah Streett

    Sarah Streett

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio Dr. Sarah Streett is the Clinical Director of Inflammatory Bowel Disease at Stanford and is passionate about taking care of people with IBD. She is a national expert in the treating of complex IBD and is expanding our services to offer multi-disciplinary care and opportunities for clinical research participation. In 2018 she received the Champion of Hope Award from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation and serves on their Medical Advisory Board. Her interests are in fertility and pregnancy in people with IBD, developing precision approaches to IBD therapy, and in the role that the microbiome and diet play its pathogenesis. She is one of the investigators in the Stanford IBD Registry and has research projects focused on optimizing clinical outcomes in IBD, the role of the microbiota and diet in IBD and pregnancy and applying new technologies to individualizing therapy for IBD.

    Dr. Streett has a national leadership role in the American Gastroenterological Association, where has been Chair of the Practice Management and Economics Committee, as well as Chair of the AGA’s initiatives on Obesity. She currently serves on the Government Affairs Committee and is a special government employee at the FDA. She has represented the interests of gastroenterologists and their patients on Capitol Hill numerous times. Dr. Streett believes strongly in a collaborative approach to give patient’s personalized care based on the latest therapies for the treatment of IBD.

  • Branden David Tarlow

    Branden David Tarlow

    Postdoctoral Medical Fellow, Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Physician scientist interested in liver regeneration, cell therapy, and cancer

  • Natalie Torok

    Natalie Torok

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory has been focusing on the mechanism of liver fibrogenesis and the role of hepatocyte cell death in fibrogenic injury. We have demonstrated the intricate link between hepatocyte cell death, generation of apoptotic bodies and their phagocytosis by stellate cells triggering fibrogenic activation. Key to this was the activation of the NADPH oxidase and production of reactive oxidative species inducing stellate cell transdifferentiation and collagen I transcription (Gastroenterology, 2010).
    We have expanded our work focusing on the role of non-phagocytic NADPH oxidases including NOX4 in dysregulating insulin responses and precipitating stress signaling in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. (Gastroenterology, 2015). As patients with type II diabetes mellitus develop more progressive liver disease we are now studying how advanced glycation end products (AGEs) engage RAGE signaling in the liver and NADPH oxidase-mediated redox stress.
    Our ultimate goal is to translate our findings and develop novel therapeutic approaches that reverse fibrosis in NASH and improve patient outcomes.

  • George Triadafilopoulos

    George Triadafilopoulos

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My primary research interest concerns factors involved in the pathogenesis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease and its complications, such as Barrett's esophagus and the role of diagnostic and therapeutic modalities in their management.

  • Thomas Zikos

    Thomas Zikos

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio I am initially a Pittsburgh, PA native, but have been at Stanford University since 2012 for residency, fellowship, and now as faculty. It is exciting to be affiliated with one of the most dynamic and innovative medical institutions worldwide.

    My clinical and research interests focus on functional, motility, and esophageal disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Outside of this sub-sub specialization, a significant portion of my practice is also devoted to the care of a broad range of “general gastroenterology” concerns.

    Functional, motility, esophageal, and general gastroenterology disorders are very common, and can cause significant disability. Some examples include irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic nausea, chronic constipation, achalasia, and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Despite the common nature of these disorders, many are not well understood, leading to frustration among both patients and clinicians alike. Furthermore, there is an incorrect stigma associated with some of these disorders that “it is all in your head.” On the opposite side of the spectrum, there is sometimes an incorrect assumption that we will be able to pinpoint an exact underlying cause in all cases, but this is not possible with current technology. We aim to bridge this gap using the latest diagnostic testing and treatment paradigms, as well as a healing hand. Additionally, our group is actively engaged in multiple research projects and studies to drive the future of the field.

    Though I am early in my career, I am hoping that by the end the field will look nothing like it does today. I am hopeful, and I believe that we can revolutionize the field to better characterize gastrointestinal disorders, and come up with highly effective targeted treatments.

Latest information on COVID-19