School of Medicine


Showing 51-100 of 442 Results

  • Mark A. Cappelli

    Mark A. Cappelli

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    Bio Professor Cappelli received his B.Sc. degree in Physics (McGill, 1980), and M.A.Sc and Ph.D. degrees in Aerospace Sciences (Toronto, 1983, 1987). He joined Stanford University in 1987 and is currently a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Co-Director of the Engineering Physics Program. He carries out research in applied plasma physics with applications to a broad range of fields, including space propulsion, aerodynamics, medicine, materials synthesis, and fusion.

  • Ian Carroll, MD, MS

    Ian Carroll, MD, MS

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult Pain) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are committed to promoting an understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, and ensuring that all patients who are suffering from cerebrospinal fluid leaks receive appropriate diagnosis and treatment of this devastating, chronic, and fixable condition. We believe this can be best accomplished in a multidisciplinary setting involving expertise in radiology, neurology, and interventional pain medicine.

  • Chris Cartwright, MD

    Chris Cartwright, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms of intestinal cell growth control; function and regulation of the Src family of tyrosine kinases in normal cells, and their deregulation in cancer cells.

  • Jennifer Caswell-Jin

    Jennifer Caswell-Jin

    Instructor, Medicine - Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research is on the translational application of next-generation sequencing technologies to breast cancer care: (1) the value of hereditary cancer genetic panel testing in clinical practice, (2) the mechanisms by which inherited genetic variants lead to breast cancer development, and (3) the analysis of somatic tumor sequencing data to inform understanding of breast tumorigenesis, metastasis, and development of resistance in response to therapeutics.

  • Alma-Martina Cepika

    Alma-Martina Cepika

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    Bio Dr. Cepika is an immunologist with an extensive background in translational research, autoimmunity, autoinflammation, and human systems immunology. Her goal is to understand the mechanisms governing immunological tolerance, and to leverage this knowledge to cure currently incurable diseases.

    Dr. Cepika received her MD degree and a PhD in Immunology from the University of Zagreb School of Medicine in Croatia. There, she focused on the immunomonitoring of patients with lupus, identifying how circulating DNA levels changed with therapy. Subsequently, she joined the lab of Dr. Virginia Pascual at the Baylor Institute for Immunology Research in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Pascual had previously discovered that IL-1beta is a key pathogenic player in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), but the immune alterations contributing to IL-1beta-mediated inflammation remained unknown. To address this, Dr. Cepika developed a 3D in vitro stimulation assay to evaluate immune responses of blood leukocytes of pediatric sJIA patients. In combination with integrated bioinformatics analysis, this approach identified aberrant cellular responses, transcriptional pathways and genes that shed new light on immune dysregulation in sJIA. This assay can be further applied to dissect underlying immunopathogenic mechanisms in many human disorders.

    Currently, Dr. Cepika is a member of the laboratory of Dr. Maria Grazia Roncarolo, in the Pediatric Division of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. There, she is working to uncover the underlying mechanisms governing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cell differentiation and function, and use this knowledge to design Tr1 cell-based therapies for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, cancer immunotherapy and autoimmunity.

  • Anne Lynn S. Chang, MD

    Anne Lynn S. Chang, MD

    Professor of Dermatology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have two main research interests:
    1) to better understand and treat patients with aggressive basal cell carcinomas
    2) to better understand the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of healthy human skin aging and to translate these insights into better care of skin diseases enriched in older patients particularly skin cancer and rosacea

  • Daniel Chang

    Daniel Chang

    Sue and Bob McCollum Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I specialize in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. I am interested in developing stereotactic body radiotherapy for tumors of the liver, both primary and metastatic. I am interested in developing functional imaging as a means of determining treatment response with radiation. I am also interested in developing image-guided radiotherapy to improve radiation delivery for GI cancers to reduce toxicity and improve disease outcome.

  • Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Research and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is focused on how the activities of hundreds or even thousands of genes (gene parties) are coordinated to achieve biological meaning. We have pioneered methods to predict, dissect, and control large-scale gene regulatory programs; these methods have provided insights into human development, cancer, and aging.

  • James K. Chen

    James K. Chen

    Jauch Professor and Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology, of Developmental Biology and of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory combines chemistry and developmental biology to investigate the molecular events that regulate embryonic patterning, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. We are currently using genetic and small-molecule approaches to study the molecular mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling, and we are developing chemical technologies to perturb and observe the genetic programs that underlie vertebrate development.

  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Instructor, Stanford Cancer Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Lu's research path has a strong focus on molecular mechanisms underlying biological processes, with emphases on reproducibility, details, and precision. Trained with leading biochemists and cancer biologists, Lu's research tool-kit incorporates genetic engineering in human cells and model organisms, bridging his mechanistic discoveries to solving human diseases.

  • Alan G. Cheng

    Alan G. Cheng

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Active Wnt signaling maintains somatic stem cells in many organ systems. Using Wnt target genes as markers, we have characterized distinct cell populations with stem cell behavior in the inner ear, an organ thought to be terminally differentiated. Ongoing work focuses on delineating the developing significance of these putative stem/progenitor cells and their behavior after damage.

  • Zhen Cheng

    Zhen Cheng

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests To develop novel molecular imaging probes and techniques for non-invasively early detection of cancer using multimodality imaging technologies including PET, SPECT, MRI, optical imaging, etc.

  • Thomas L. Cherpes, DVM, MD

    Thomas L. Cherpes, DVM, MD

    Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Directs an infectious disease laboratory that performs basic, translational, and clinical research. Laboratory has particular focus on:
    1) relationship between exogenous sex steroids on susceptibility to microbial pathogens
    2) role of Type 2 immunity in Chlamydia infection
    3) developing cellular immunotherapies to combat infectious disease and cancer

  • Athena Cherry

    Athena Cherry

    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The use of molecular and molecular cytogenetic methods to identify chromosomal abnormalities in acquired and congenital disorders.

  • Ramsey Cheung

    Ramsey Cheung

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Cheung's research interests focus on liver diseases, with emphasis on viral hepatitis. His past research include investigating the mechanism of viral neutralization of hepatitis B virus at the molecular level and immune response to hepatitis C virus. Dr. Cheung is studing various aspects of hepatitis C, both clinical and translational research.

  • Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Professor of Microbiology & Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Contribution of T cells to immunocompetence and autoimmunity; how the immune system clears infection, avoids autoimmunity and how infection impacts on the development of immune responses.

  • Albert Sean Chiou, MD, MBA

    Albert Sean Chiou, MD, MBA

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a clinical researcher interested in evaluating promising new diagnostic paradigms and treatments for serious or poorly treated, chronic skin conditions. My research currently includes:

    Therapeutics:

    - Treatments for itch from epidermolysis bullosa

    - Treatments for chronic wounds for patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (In collaboration with Dr. Jean Tang and Dr. Peter Marinkovich)

    - Treatments for atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and other inflammatory skin conditions

    Diagnostics:

    - Artificial intelligence approaches for melanoma and skin cancer early detection

    - Imaging mass spectrometry for skin cancer margin analysis and diagnosis

    I collaborate with other faculty within the Stanford Skin Innovation and Interventional Research Group (SIIRG) to conduct investigator initiated and sponsored clinical trials seeking to improve care for important dermatologic diseases

  • Bill Chiu

    Bill Chiu

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Chiu obtained his B.S. degree in Biological Sciences and graduated with Honors from Stanford University. After graduating, he received his Medical Degree at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where he remained for his internship and General Surgery residency training. Dr. Chiu completed his Pediatric Surgery training at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He is an Associate Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine where he has an active research program studying innovative approaches to treat patients with neuroblastoma.

  • Gilbert Chu

    Gilbert Chu

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests After shuttering the wet lab, we have focused on: a point-of-care device to measure blood ammonia and prevent brain damage; a human protein complex that juxtaposes and joins DNA ends for repair and V(D)J recombination; and strategies for teaching students and for reducing selection bias in educational programs.

  • Katrin Chua

    Katrin Chua

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab is interested in understanding molecular processes that underlie aging and age-associated pathologies in mammals. We focus on a family of genes, the SIRTs, which regulate stress resistance and lifespan in lower organisms such as yeast, worms, and flies. In mammals, we recently uncovered a number of ways in which SIRT factors may contribute to cellular and organismal aging by regulating resistance to various forms of stress. We have now begun to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which these SIRT factors function. In particular, we are interested in how SIRT factors regulate chromatin, the molecular structure in which the DNA of mammalian genomes is packaged, and how such functions may link genome maintenance to stress resistance and aging.

  • Karlene Cimprich

    Karlene Cimprich

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genomic instability contributes to many diseases, but it also underlies many natural processes. The Cimprich lab is focused on understanding how mammalian cells maintain genomic stability in the context of DNA replication stress and DNA damage. We are interested in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to replication stress and DNA damage as well as the links between DNA damage and replication stress to human disease.

  • Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Karel H. and Avice N. Beekhuis Professor in Cancer Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Clarke maintains a laboratory focused on two areas of research: i) the control of self-renewal of normal stem cells and diseases such as cancer and hereditary diseases; and ii) the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells. His laboratory is investigating how perturbations of stem cell regulatory machinery contributes to human disease. In particular, the laboratory is investigating epigenetic regulators of self renewal, the process by which stem cells regenerate themselves.

  • Michael Cleary

    Michael Cleary

    Lindhard Family Professor in Pediatric Cancer Biology and Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The role of oncoproteins in cancer and development; molecular and cellular biology of hematologic malignancies; targeted molecular therapies of cancer.

  • Jennifer R. Cochran

    Jennifer R. Cochran

    Shriram Chair of Bioengineering, Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular Engineering, Protein Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Cell and Tissue Engineering, Molecular Imaging, Chemical Biology

  • Harvey Cohen

    Harvey Cohen

    Deborah E. Addicott - John A. Kriewall and Elizabeth A. Haehl Family Professor in Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests extend from hypothesis-driven studies in biochemistry and cell biology to discovery-driven interests in proteomics and systems biology to clinical treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia of children, and pediatric palliative care.

  • Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Genetics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study mechanisms that affect the expression and decay of normal and abnormal mRNAs, and also RNA-related mechanisms that regulate microbial antibiotic resistance. A small bioinformatics team within our lab has developed knowledge based systems to aid in investigations of genes.

  • A. Dimitrios Colevas

    A. Dimitrios Colevas

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Multi- modality treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    Phase 1 clinical trials

  • Christos E. Constantinou

    Christos E. Constantinou

    Associate Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main recent interest is the application of Biomedical Engineering approaches for the clinical visualization and characterization of the static and dynamic properties of pelvic floor function. This extends to ultrasound Imaging and image processing, construction of computer models and biomechanics analysis of pelvic floor function. It is envisioned that these considerations are important constituents of the clinical evaluation of patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction and urodynamics.

  • John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our translational research program in vascular regeneration is focused on generating and characterizing vascular cells from human induced pluripotential stem cells. We are also studying the therapeutic application of these cells in murine models of peripheral arterial disease. In these studies we leverage our longstanding interest in endothelial signaling, eg by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as by nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR).

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Over the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Steven Coutre

    Steven Coutre

    Professor of Medicine (Hematology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research integrates clinical care of patients with novel treatments for a variety of hematologic disorders. I see patients with a wide range of problems with a particular focus on chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma. I provide comprehensive consultative services as well as treatment for both the acute and chronic leukemias as well as non-malignant conditions such as clotting disorders and thrombocytopenia.

  • Gerald Crabtree

    Gerald Crabtree

    Department of Pathology Professor in Experimental Pathology and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Chromatin regulation and its roles in human cancer and the development of the nervous system. Engineering new methods for studying and controlling chromatin in living cells.

  • Christina Curtis

    Christina Curtis

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Curtis laboratory is focused on the development and application of innovative experimental, computational, and analytical approaches to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and early detection of cancer.

  • Gary Dahl

    Gary Dahl

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Hematology/Oncology, Phase I drug studies for childhood cancer, overcoming multidrug resistance in leukemia and solid tumors, biology and treatment of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, early detection of central nervous system leukemia by measuring growth, factor binding proteins.

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Ultrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Hongjie Dai

    Hongjie Dai

    The J.G. Jackson and C.J. Wood Professor in Chemistry

    Bio Professor Dai’s research spans chemistry, physics, and materials and biomedical sciences, leading to materials with properties useful in electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. Recent developments include near-infrared-II fluorescence imaging, ultra-sensitive diagnostic assays, a fast-charging aluminum battery and inexpensive electrocatalysts that split water into oxygen and hydrogen fuels.

    Born in 1966 in Shaoyang, China, Hongjie Dai began his formal studies in physics at Tsinghua U. (B.S. 1989) and applied sciences at Columbia U. (M.S. 1991). He obtained his Ph.D. from Harvard U and performed postdoctoral research with Dr. Richard Smalley. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1997, and in 2007 was named Jackson–Wood Professor of Chemistry. Among many awards, he has been recognized with the ACS Pure Chemistry Award, APS McGroddy Prize for New Materials, Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics and Materials Research Society Mid-Career Award. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and Foreign Member of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

    The Dai Laboratory has advanced the synthesis and basic understanding of carbon nanomaterials and applications in nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, energy storage and electrocatalysis.

    Nanomaterials
    The Dai Lab pioneered some of the now-widespread uses of chemical vapor deposition for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth, including vertically aligned nanotubes and patterned growth of single-walled CNTs on wafer substrates, facilitating fundamental studies of their intrinsic properties. The group developed the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons, and of nanocrystals and nanoparticles on CNTs and graphene with controlled degrees of oxidation, producing a class of strongly coupled hybrid materials with advanced properties for electrochemistry, electrocatalysis and photocatalysis. The lab’s synthesis of a novel plasmonic gold film has enhanced near-infrared fluorescence up to 100-fold, enabling ultra-sensitive assays of disease biomarkers.

    Nanoscale Physics and Electronics
    High quality nanotubes from his group’s synthesis are widely used to investigate the electrical, mechanical, optical, electro-mechanical and thermal properties of quasi-one-dimensional systems. Lab members have studied ballistic electron transport in nanotubes and demonstrated nanotube-based nanosensors, Pd ohmic contacts and ballistic field effect transistors with integrated high-kappa dielectrics.

    Nanomedicine and NIR-II Imaging
    Advancing biological research with CNTs and nano-graphene, group members have developed π–π stacking non-covalent functionalization chemistry, molecular cellular delivery (drugs, proteins and siRNA), in vivo anti-cancer drug delivery and in vivo photothermal ablation of cancer. Using nanotubes as novel contrast agents, lab collaborations have developed in vitro and in vivo Raman, photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging. Lab members have exploited the physics of reduced light scattering in the near-infrared-II (1000-1700nm) window and pioneered NIR-II fluorescence imaging to increase tissue penetration depth in vivo. Video-rate NIR-II imaging can measure blood flow in single vessels in real time. The lab has developed novel NIR-II fluorescence agents, including CNTs, quantum dots, conjugated polymers and small organic dyes with promise for clinical translation.

    Electrocatalysis and Batteries
    The Dai group’s nanocarbon–inorganic particle hybrid materials have opened new directions in energy research. Advances include electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and water splitting catalysts including NiFe layered-double-hydroxide for oxygen evolution. Recently, the group also demonstrated an aluminum ion battery with graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes, a substantial breakthrough in battery science.

  • Heike Daldrup-Link

    Heike Daldrup-Link

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As a physician-scientist involved in the care of pediatric patients and developing novel pediatric molecular imaging technologies, my goal is to link the fields of nanotechnology and medical imaging towards more efficient diagnoses and image-guided therapies. Our research team develops novel imaging techniques for improved cancer diagnosis, for image-guided-drug delivery and for in vivo monitoring of cell therapies in children and young adults.

  • Edward J. Damrose, MD, FACS

    Edward J. Damrose, MD, FACS

    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Anesthesiology, Perioperative & Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Advanced MRI imaging for laryngeal cancer and swallowing disorders; applications of robotics in microlaryngeal surgery; high speed digital imaging of vocal fold vibration; the effects of hormones and anabolic steroids on vocal function.

  • Bruce Daniel

    Bruce Daniel

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. MRI of Breast Cancer, particularly new techniques. Currently being explored are techniques including ultra high spatial resolution MRI and contrast-agent-free detection of breast tumors.

    2. MRI-guided interventions, especially MRI-compatible remote manipulation and haptics

    3. Medical Mixed Reality. Currently being explored are methods of fusing patients and their images to potentially improve breast conserving surgery, and other conditions.

  • Millie Das

    Millie Das

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    Bio Dr. Das specializes in the treatment of thoracic malignancies. She sees and treats patients both at the Stanford Cancer Center and at the Palo Alto VA Hospital. She is Chief of Oncology at the Palo Alto VA and also leads the VA thoracic tumor board on a biweekly basis. She has a strong interest in clinical research, serving as a principal investigator for multiple clinical and translational studies at the Palo Alto VA, and also as a co-investigator on all of the lung cancer trials at Stanford. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her family, traveling, and running.

  • Kara Davis

    Kara Davis

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Childhood cancers can be considered aberrations of normal tissue development. We are interested in understanding childhood cancers through the lens of normal development. Further, individual tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations, not all cells being equal in their ability to respond to treatment or to repopulate a tumor. Thus, we take single cell approach to determine populations of clinical relevance.

  • Mark M. Davis

    Mark M. Davis

    Director, Stanford Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection and the Burt and Marion Avery Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms of lymphocyte recognition and differentiation; Systems immunology and human immunology; vaccination and infection.

  • Ronald W. Davis

    Ronald W. Davis

    Professor of Biochemistry and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Human to conduct whole genome analysis projects. The yeast genome sequence has approximately 6,000 genes. We have made a set of haploid and diploid strains (21,000) containing a complete deletion of each gene. In order to facilitate whole genome analysis each deletion is molecularly tagged with a unique 20-mer DNA sequence. This sequence acts as a molecular bar code and makes it easy to identify the presence of each deletion.

  • Adam de la Zerda

    Adam de la Zerda

    Associate Professor of Structural Biology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular imaging technologies for studying cancer biology in vivo

  • Utkan Demirci

    Utkan Demirci

    Professor of Radiology (Canary Cancer Center)

    Bio Dr. Demirci is currently a Professor with tenure at Stanford University School of Medicine and Principal Investigator of the Demirci Bio-Acoustic MEMS in Medicine (BAMM) Lab at the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection. He received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1999 as a James B. Angell Scholar (summa cum laude) from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He received his M.S. degree in 2001 in Electrical Engineering, M.S. degree in Management Science and Engineering in 2005, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2005, all from Stanford University.

    BAMM Lab specializes in applying micro- and nanoscale technologies to problems in medicine and early cancer detection at the interface between micro/nanoscale engineering and medicine. Our goal is to apply innovative technologies to clinical problems. Our major research theme focuses on creating new microfluidic technology platforms targeting broad applications in medicine. In this interdisciplinary space at the convergence of engineering, biology and materials science, we create novel technologies for disposable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and monitoring of infectious diseases, cancer and controlling cellular microenvironment in nanoliter droplets for biopreservation and microscale tissue engineering applications. These applications are unified around our expertise to test the limits of cell manipulation by establishing microfluidic platforms to provide solutions to real world problems at the clinic.

    Our lab creates technologies to manipulate cells in nanoliter volumes to enable solutions for real world problems in medicine including applications in infectious disease diagnostics and monitoring for global health, cancer early detection, cell encapsulation in nanoliter droplets for cryobiology, and bottom-up tissue engineering. Dr. Demirci has published over 120 peer reviewed publications in journals including PNAS, Nature Communications, Advanced Materials, Small, Trends in Biotechnology, Chemical Society Reviews and Lab-chip, over 150 conference abstracts and proceedings, 10+ book chapters, and an edited book. His work was highlighted in Wired Magazine, Nature Photonics, Nature Medicine, MIT Technology Review, Reuters Health News, Science Daily, AIP News, BioTechniques, and Biophotonics. He is fellow-elect of the American Institute of Biological and Medical Engineering (AIMBE, 2017). His scientific work has been recognized by numerous national and international awards including the NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award (2012), the IEEE-EMBS Early Career Achievement Award (2012), Scientist of the year award from Stanford radiology Department (2017). He was selected as one of the world’s top 35 young innovators under the age of 35 (TR-35) by the MIT Technology Review at the age of 28. In 2004, he led a team that won the Stanford University Entrepreneur’s Challenge Competition and Global Start-up Competition in Singapore. His work has been translated to start-up companies including DxNow, KOEK Biotechnology and LEVITAS. There has been over 10,000 live births in the US, Europe, Asia, and Middle East using the sperm selection technology that came out of Dr. Demirci's lab.

  • Atman Desai, MD

    Atman Desai, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory aims to analyze and solve healthcare problems relating to neurosurgical care and spine care on a population level. Through the development of algorithms that can be applied to various large national and state-level healthcare datasets, our goal is to harness big data to:

    1. Understand how quality in neurosurgical care and spine care can be defined in both short and long-term measures

    2. Develop appropriate measures of quality neurosurgical and spine care

    3. Create benchmarks for care in neurosurgery and spine surgery

    4. Create multivariate bio-statistical models of pre-operative, peri-operative and post-operative events and long term patient outcomes

    5. Understand how existing paradigms in neurosurgical care and spine care can be potentially improved to improve patient outcomes

    In addition to our population level research, our laboratory has been a national pioneer in integrating prospective outcomes driven medical informative and database systems into the electronic health record. This allows us to identify pre- and post-operative treatment measures that influence patient outcomes, and in doing so improve patient safety and maximize the efficacy of current treatments for neurosurgical and spine patients.

  • Kaniksha Desai

    Kaniksha Desai

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    Bio Dr. Kaniksha Desai is a board-certified endocrinologist and clinical assistant professor of endocrinology at Stanford University. She completed her endocrinology fellowship at the Mayo Clinic, with an emphasis on the management of patients with thyroid cancer. Dr. Desai’s clinical practice focuses on the management of patients with thyroid diseases, including thyroid nodules and thyroid cancers, and the management of patients with pituitary disorders. She also maintains board certification in neck ultrasonography and internal medicine.

  • Manisha Desai

    Manisha Desai

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Desai is the Director of the Quantitative Sciences Unit. She is interested in the application of biostatistical methods to all areas of medicine including oncology, nephrology, and endocrinology. She works on methods for the analysis of epidemiologic studies, clinical trials, and studies with missing observations.

  • Tushar Desai

    Tushar Desai

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We investigate the cellular and molecular events that regulate proper development of the lungs, including how the gas exchange region is maintained and renewed throughout life. We apply this knowledge to dissect how dysregulation of these normal processes can cause or contribute to specific lung diseases like pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and lung cancer, and we are interested in uncovering how lung stem cells are regulated in the hopes of harnessing them as a regenerative therapy for patients.

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