School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 52 Results

  • Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Dennis Farrey Family Professor in Pediatrics, and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the Program in Human Gene Therapy and Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Genetics. Respected worldwide for his work in gene therapy for hemophilia, Dr. Kay and his laboratory focus on establishing the scientific principles and developing the technologies needed for achieving persistent and therapeutic levels of gene expression in vivo. The major disease models are hemophilia, hepatitis C, and hepatitis B viral infections.

  • Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS

    Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS

    Harry A. Oberhelman, Jr. and Mark L. Welton Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kebebew’s translational and clinical investigations have three main scientific goals: 1) to develop effective therapies for fatal, rare and neglected endocrine cancers, 2) to identify new methods, strategies and technologies for improving the diagnosis and treatment of endocrine neoplasms and the prognostication of endocrine cancers, and 3) to develop methods for precision treatment of endocrine tumors.

  • Chaitan Khosla

    Chaitan Khosla

    Director, ChEM-H, Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research in this laboratory focuses on problems where deep insights into enzymology and metabolism can be harnessed to improve human health.

    For the past two decades, we have studied and engineered enzymatic assembly lines called polyketide synthases that catalyze the biosynthesis of structurally complex and medicinally fascinating antibiotics in bacteria. An example of such an assembly line is found in the erythromycin biosynthetic pathway. Our current focus is on understanding the structure and mechanism of this polyketide synthase. At the same time, we are developing methods to decode the vast and growing number of orphan polyketide assembly lines in the sequence databases.

    For more than a decade, we have also investigated the pathogenesis of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, with the goal of discovering therapies and related management tools for this widespread but overlooked disease. Ongoing efforts focus on understanding the pivotal role of transglutaminase 2 in triggering the inflammatory response to dietary gluten in the celiac intestine.

  • Eric Kool

    Eric Kool

    The George A. and Hilda M. Daubert Professor in Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests • Development of cell-permeable reagents for study and modification of RNAs
    • Developing small-molecule probes of DNA repair pathways
    • Design of a functional new genetic set, xDNA and xRNA (structure, function, applications)
    • Synthesis of combinatorial fluorescent assemblies built on a DNA scaffold (oligodeoxyfluorosides, ODFs) as labels and sensors for biology and medicine

  • Shivaani Kummar

    Shivaani Kummar

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kummar’s research interests focus on developing novel therapies for cancer. She specializes in conducting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic driven first-in-human trials tailored to make early, informed decisions regarding the suitability of novel molecular agents for further clinical investigation. Her studies integrate genomics and laboratory correlates into early phase trials. She is interested in alternate trial designs to facilitate rational drug selection based on human data and help expedite drug development timelines. She has published numerous articles in medical journals and serves on a number of national and international scientific committees.

  • Pamela L. Kunz

    Pamela L. Kunz

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Kunz specializes in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies with an expertise in the care of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). She has developed broad investigative programs in the field of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), encompassing clinical trials, population sciences, and translational correlates. Stanford has a robust referral base for neuroendocrine tumors and has demonstrated successful accrual to clinical trials in this rare disease. She has been involved with the design, development and conduct of Phase I, II, and III clinical trials in this field. She holds a number of leadership positions in the field including Vice Chair of the Neuroendocrine Tumor Taskforce of the National Cancer institute and member of the NANETS Board of Directors. She also serves on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Neuroendocrine Tumors Guidelines Panel and the NET Working Group of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and is the founding Director of the Stanford Neuroendocrine Tumor Program, established in 2015.

  • Philip W. Lavori

    Philip W. Lavori

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Biostatistics, clinical trials, longitudinal studies, casual inference from observational studies, genetic tissue banking, informed consent. Trial designs for dynamic (adaptive) treatment regimes, psychiatric research, cancer.

  • Shoshana Levy

    Shoshana Levy

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on the mechanism of action of tetraspanins, an evolutionary conserved, widely expressed multi-gene family. We study a prototype, CD81, a molecule implicated in the pathogenesis of two major human diseases: hepatitis C virus (HCV) and malaria.

  • Sanjay Malhotra

    Sanjay Malhotra

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiation Oncology (Radiation and Cancer Biology), of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus on the design and discovery of synthetic, and natural product inspired small molecules which can be used as probes for developing understanding of biological phenomena, including protein-protein interactions and modulation of signal transduction pathways. My laboratory employs the tools of synthetic medicinal chemistry, molecular modeling and chemical biology for translational research in drug discovery, development, imaging and radiation.

  • Suleiman Alfred Massarweh

    Suleiman Alfred Massarweh

    Member, Bio-X

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My work is focused in investigating mechanisms of endocrine resistance in ER-positive breast cancer and novel clinical trial designs of combined ER and targeted therapeutics. Primary areas of investigation are in metastatic disease and preoperative clinical trials.
    Additional areas of interest include breast cancer in young women, in men, and breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy.

  • AC Matin

    AC Matin

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Improvement of our newly discovered cancer prodrug regimen that permits noninvaisve visualization of drug activation. 2. Tracking tumors & cancer metastases using bacterial magnetite and newly developed single-cell tracking by MRI. 3. Molecular basis of bacterial planktonic and biofilm antibiotic resistance on Earth and under space microgravity -- development of new countermeasures; 4. Bioremediation.

  • Daria Mochly-Rosen

    Daria Mochly-Rosen

    The George D. Smith Professor in Translational Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Two areas: 1. Using rationally-designed peptide inhibitors to study protein-protein interactions in cell signaling. Focus: protein kinase C in heart and large GTPases regulating mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegdenration. 2. Using small molecules (identified in a high throughput screens and synthetic chemistry) as activators and inhibitors of aldehyde dehydrogenases, a family of detoxifying enzymes, and glucose-6-phoshate dehydrogenase, in normal cells and in models of human diseases.

  • Prithvi Mruthyunjaya, MD, MHS

    Prithvi Mruthyunjaya, MD, MHS

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr Mruthyunjaya has maintained a broad research interest with publications in both ocular oncology and retinal diseases.
    His focus is on multi-modal imaging of ocular tumors and understanding imaging clues that may predict vision loss after ocular radiation therapy. He coordinates multi-center research on the role of genetic testing and outcomes of treatments of ocular melanoma.
    In the field of retinal diseases, his interests are in intra-operative imaging to enhance surgical accuracy.

  • Joel Neal, MD, PhD

    Joel Neal, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a thoracic oncologist who cares for patients with non-small cell lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, and other thoracic malignancies. I design and conduct clinical trials of novel therapies in collaboration with other researchers and pharmaceutical companies. These generally focus on two areas, 1) targeted therapies against particular mutations in cancers (for example EGFR, ALK, ROS1, HER2, KRAS, MET, and others) and 2) the emerging field of immunotherapy in cancer, using anti PD-1/PD-L1 therapies in combination with other agents, and also developing cellular therapies. I also collaborate with other researchers on campus to apply emerging technologies to cancer therapy, for example, circulating tumor DNA detection. Additionally, in my role as the Cancer Center IT Medical Director, I coordinate projects relating to our use of the electronic health record to improve provider efficiency and facilitate patient care.

  • Mark Pegram

    Mark Pegram

    Susy Yuan-Huey Hung Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms of targeted therapy resistance in breast and other cancers

  • Lawrence Recht, MD

    Lawrence Recht, MD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory focuses on two interrelated projects: (1) assessment of glioma development within the framework of the multistage model of carcinogenesis through utilization of the rodent model of ENU neurocarcinogenesis; and (2) assessment of stem cell specification and pluripotency using an embryonic stem cell model system in which neural differentiation is induced.

  • Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Allan and Tina Neill Professor of Lymphatic Research and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical research includes studies on risk factor modification in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease; clinical trials involving medical therapies for peripheral arterial insufficiency; coronary angiogenesis; therapy of lymphedema; atherand photodynamic therapy in atherosclerosis.

  • Eben Rosenthal

    Eben Rosenthal

    Professor of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Bio Eben Rosenthal is a surgeon-scientist and academic leader. He is currently serving as the John and Ann Doerr Medical Director of the Stanford Cancer Center, a position he has held since July 2015. He works collaboratively with the Stanford Cancer Institute and Stanford Health Care leaders to set the strategy for the clinical delivery of cancer care across Stanford Medicine and growing cancer networks.

    Before coming to Stanford, he learned his surgical skills in otolaryngology from the University of Michigan and traveled west for further training in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Oregon Health and Science University. He joined the faculty at University of Alabama at Birmingham where he started as an Assistant Professor of Surgery within the Division of Otolaryngology. In 2012, Dr. Rosenthal became Division Director of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and the holder of the John S. Odess Endowed Chair at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He moved to Stanford in 2015 to become the Ann and John Doerr Medical Director of the Stanford Cancer Center.

    Dr. Rosenthal is certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology and is a Diplomat of the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He specializes in the treatment and reconstruction of head and neck cancer patients. He has a strong interest in development of new strategies to surgically repair complex head and neck defects to improve functional and cosmetic outcomes.

    He has published over 160 peer-reviewed scientific manuscripts, authored many book chapters and published a book on optical imaging in cancer. He is on the editorial board of Head & Neck and The Laryngoscope and is also a charter member of the NIH Developmental Therapeutics Study Section. Dr. Rosenthal has performed preclinical and clinical research on the role of targeted therapies for use to treat cancer alone and in combination with conventional therapy. He has served as principal investigator on several early phase investigator-initiated and industry sponsored clinical trials in molecular oncology. He has received grant funding from the American Cancer Society, NIH/NCI and NIH/NIDCR to study the role of targeted therapy and novel imaging strategies in cancer.

    Dr. Rosenthal has conducted bench to bedside development of optical contrast agents to identify cancer in the operating room. He led a multidisciplinary team of scientists through successful IND application to allow testing of fluorescently labeled antibodies in the clinic and operating room. These early phase clinical trials have demonstrated that this technique can visualize microscopic cancer in the operating room and may significantly improve clinical outcomes.

  • Joseph Shrager

    Joseph Shrager

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In clinical research, Dr. Shrager has been an innovator studying outcomes in a variety of areas within Thoracic Surgery including: parenchyma-sparing operations and minimally invasive resections for lung cancer, transcervical thymectomy for myasthenia gravis, and surgical treatment of emphysema.

    In the lab, Dr. Shrager is focused on the impact of disease states upon the diaphragm. His group published the seminal paper (NEJM) describing diaphragm atrophy assoc'd with mechanical ventilation.

  • Branimir I. Sikic, M. D.

    Branimir I. Sikic, M. D.

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research Interests: cancer pharmacology, mechanisms of resistance to anticancer drugs, regulation and function of MDR1 and tubulin genes, CD47 as a target for activation of anticancer macrophases, Phase I trials of new drugs, gene expression profiling of cancers

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