School of Medicine


Showing 10,091-10,100 of 10,349 Results

  • Alan Yeung, MD

    Alan Yeung, MD

    The Li Ka Shing Professor in Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in men and women in the United States. Our group is interested in studying both the early and late phases of atherosclerosis so that we can better develop prevention and treatment strategies.

  • Serena Yeung

    Serena Yeung

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    Bio Dr. Serena Yeung is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Her research focus is on developing artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms to enable new capabilities in biomedicine and healthcare. She has extensive expertise in deep learning and computer vision, and has developed computer vision algorithms for analyzing diverse types of visual data ranging from video capture of human behavior, to medical images and cell microscopy images.

    Dr. Yeung leads the Medical AI and Computer Vision Lab at Stanford. She is affiliated with the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the Clinical Excellence Research Center, the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine & Imaging, the Center for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, and Bio-X. She also serves on the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director Working Group on Artificial Intelligence.

  • Maame Yaa A. B. Yiadom

    Maame Yaa A. B. Yiadom

    Clinical Instructor, Emergency Medicine

    Bio Dr. Yiadom is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University and researcher with expertise in emergency care clinical operations and timely emergency care delivery. She was first trained in health care policy in Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs. She subsequently worked as a healthcare industry management consultant here in New York City for CSC Global Health Solutions Group, and was the Dean’s Office Chief of Staff at Drexel Medical School in Philadelphia. She completed her medical education at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, a Masters in Public Health (MPH) at Harvard with additional health policy training from Johns Hopkins. She subsequently did residency at Mass General and Brigham and Women’s Hospitals’ Harvard affiliated program, and completed a Masters of Science in Clinical Investigation (MSCI) at Vanderbilt University.

    Dr. Yiadom is the Principal Investigator for the Stanford Emergency Care Health Services Research Data Coordinating Center (HSR-DCC). Her research focuses on applications of evidence-based medicine to optimize clinical operations to target patient pathophysiology for time-sensitive conditions. STEMI is her prototype disease. Current work includes refining clinical process, using informatics to support evidence-based practice, and performance measurement to identify real-world care improvement opportunities. Her research is supported by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and ED Benchmarking Alliance. She is the Founding Director of the Emergency Department Operations Study Group (EDOSG), and on the Board of Directors for the Emergency Department Benchmarking Alliance (EDBA). Her interested in population health via emergency care have extended to Haiti, Guyana and Ghana. She and her husband Ryan Van Cleave (Airforce veteran, and Northern California native) have 3 children: Marialex (age 17), Victoria (age 14), and Jasmine (age 5).

  • Melis Yilmaz Balban

    Melis Yilmaz Balban

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I’m interested in understanding the neurobiology of fear. In my graduate work I discovered a novel innate fear response in mice; extended freezing or fleeing into a nest in response to the visual display of an approaching object. I investigated the roles of neural circuits in the retina in driving these behaviors. For my postdoctoral work, I would like to study visual fear behaviors and neural circuitry in primate models due to their similarity to humans.

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