School of Medicine


Showing 1-45 of 45 Results

  • Maya Adam

    Maya Adam

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Bio Maya Adam MD is the Director of Health Education Outreach at Stanford's Center for Health Education and the Faculty Lead for the Digital Medical Education International Collaborative in South Africa. Adam has been teaching at Stanford University since 2009. She received her BA in Human Biology from Stanford before studying medicine at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Prior to her post-secondary studies, she spent 10 years as a professional ballet dancer with the State Theater of Saxony in Germany. At the Stanford Center for Health Education, Adam creates online educational content for use in under-served populations, including those in low- and middle-income countries. Adam leads five massive open online health education courses, serving more than 450,000 international learners. In South Africa, her team collaborates with UNICEF and the National Department of Health to create digital educational content for community health workers and mothers as part of the Road to Health initiative. Adam is the author of Food Love Family: A Practical Guide to Child Nutrition.

  • Manuel Amieva

    Manuel Amieva

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory studies how bacteria colonize our bodies for long periods of time, and how interactions between bacteria and the epithelial surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract and skin may lead to disease. Epithelial surfaces are the first barrier against infection, but they also where our bodies meet and co-evolve with the microbial world.. Several of our studies have focused on the epithelial junctions as a target for bacterial pathogens. The host epithelium uses its epithelial junctions to form a tight but dynamic barrier with an external surface that is inhospitable to microbial attachment, secretes anti-microbial compounds, and has a rapid rate of self-renewal. The balance in the microbe-epithelial relationship results in silent commensalism or symbiosis; an imbalance results in diseases ranging from acute bacterial invasive disease to chronic ulcers or carcinoma.

    Our laboratory has developed novel microscopy applications such as quantitative 3D confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, time-lapse imaging, microinjection and micromanipulation to visualize the interaction of pathogens with epithelial cells in culture and in animal and human tissues. Many of out studies focus on the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, but we have also expanded our investigations to include the intestinal pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica, and the skin pathogen and colonizer Staphylococcus aureus. I believe that elucidating how microbes communicate with and alter our epithelial cells at a molecular level will be important for finding novel therapeutic targets to control mucosal colonization and prevent invasive disease.

    Using this perspective, we have uncovered several novel concepts of how bacteria colonize and breach our epithelial surfaces. For example, we discovered that Helicobacter pylori target the intercellular junctions, and in particular that the virulence factor CagA affects junction assembly and cell polarity. This confers H. pylori the ability to extract nutrients and grow directly on the epithelial surface. We also found that these properties of CagA have consequences for cellular transformation of the epithelium. For instance, we showed that H. pylori affect the activity and state of epithelial stem cells in the stomach by colonizing the epithelial surface deep in the gastric glands. This gland-associated population is essential for pathological inflammation and hyperplasia in animal models, and confers significant colonization advantages to the bacteria. Our Listeria research uncovered a new mechanism and site where bacteria can breach the gastrointestinal epithelial barrier to invade. We found that Listeria find their receptor for invasion at sites of epithelial senescence, where the epithelial junctions undergo dynamic turnover. To study Salmonella and H. pylori we have developed a human organoid model to study their interactions with human gut epithelium in vitro. To study Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis, we have developed methods to visualize infection at the scale of a single bacterial microcolony using an organoid culture system of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts that grow into a 3D skin-equivalent. We recently identified several proteins at the eptithelial junctions as host factors involved in the pathogenesis of one of Staphylococcus aureus major toxins.

  • Ann M. Arvin

    Ann M. Arvin

    Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory investigates the pathogenesis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, focusing on the functional roles of particular viral gene products in pathogenesis and virus-cell interactions in differentiated human cells in humans and in Scid-hu mouse models of VZV cell tropisms in vivo, and the immunobiology of VZV infections.

  • Sharon F. Chen

    Sharon F. Chen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interest is in viral infections affecting immunocompromised patients. As Co-director of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Program for Immunocompromised Hosts, I develop and conduct clinical and translational studies to establish best practices for these patients.
    My education scholarship interests are in refining active learning, framed by improving student learning, in characterizing and assessing adaptive expertise of physicians, and in diagnostic accuracy/cognitive biases.

  • Despina Contopoulos-Ioannidis, MD

    Despina Contopoulos-Ioannidis, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Evidence based medicine: Systematic reviews, Meta-analyses
    Congenital Infections-Prenatal Screening with Point-Of-Care Tests
    Congenital Toxoplasmosis
    Comparative effectiveness-Comparative safety research
    Outcomes research (Patient safety)
    Antimicrobial Stewardship
    Early Life Antibiotic Use and Weight Gain

  • Cornelia L. Dekker, M.D.

    Cornelia L. Dekker, M.D.

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Stanford-LPCH Vaccine Program provides an infrastructure for conducting clinical studies of vaccines in children and adults. We conduct immunology studies of seasonal influenza vaccines in twins, in a longitudinal cohort of young and elderly adults and studies of various vaccine candidates for NIH and industry. Additionally, we were a CDC Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment site for 10 years working on safety issues concerning licensed vaccines.

  • Elizabeth Egan

    Elizabeth Egan

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Malaria is a parasitic disease transmitted by mosquitos that is a leading cause of childhood mortality globally. Public health efforts to control malaria have historically been hampered by the rapid development of drug resistance. The goal of our research is to understand the molecular determinants of critical host-pathogen interactions in malaria, with a focus on the erythrocyte host cell. Our long-term goal is to develop novel approaches to prevent or treat malaria and improve child health.

  • Hayley Gans

    Hayley Gans

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The focus of my laboratory is the immune response to viral vaccines evaluating the ontogeny of responses in infants and limitations in immunocompromised hosts. We have studied responses to an early two-dose measles immunization, one versus 2 doses of varicella immunization, and polio vaccine in preterm versus term infants. Other active areas of research include measles and varicella immunity in HIV infected individuals, and transplant recipients.

  • Jennifer Kang

    Jennifer Kang

    Academic Prog Prof 2, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Role at Stanford Program Manager, Global Child Health Program

  • Amy Krystosik

    Amy Krystosik

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Infectious Diseases

    Bio I am a post-doctoral scholar and epidemiologist passionate about environmental health and social justice. I have recently finished my Ph.D. in public health epidemiology from Kent State University College of Public Health focusing on chikungunya, Zika, and dengue in Cali, Colombia. My many roles in the LaBeaud lab include: supporting and enhancing ongoing and future projects in data management, mapping, and analysis; creating collaborations; designing new studies; and thinking about global health. Previously I worked on vector control with attractive toxic sugar baiting experiments and dengue and Chagas’ disease surveillance and control. I also have experience in prevention of domestic violence and HIV through human rights advocacy. I studied international health and development at Tulane University School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene and Biochemistry at John Carroll University.

  • Angelle Desiree LaBeaud

    Angelle Desiree LaBeaud

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases), Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Arthropod-borne viruses are emerging and re-emerging infections that are spreading throughout the world. Our laboratory investigates the epidemiology of arboviral infections, focusing on the burden of disease and the long-term complications on human health. In particular, Dr. LaBeaud investigates dengue, chikungunya, and Rift Valley fever viruses in Kenya, where outbreaks cause fever, arthritis, retinitis, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever. Our main research questions focus on the risk factors for arboviral infections, the development of diagnostic tests that can be administered in the field to quickly determine what kind of arboviral infection a person has, and the genetic and immunologic investigation of why different people respond differently to the same infection. Our long-term goals are to contribute to a deeper understanding of arboviral infections and their long-term health consequences and to optimize control strategies to prevent these emerging infections. Our laboratory also investigates the effects of antenatal and postnatal parasitic infections on vaccine responses, growth, and development of Kenyan children.

    My lab at Stanford supports the field work that is ongoing in Kenya, but we also have several projects that are based locally. We strive to improve diagnostics of arboviral infections and are using Luminex technology to build a new screening assay. We also have created a Luminex based platform to assess vaccine responses against multiple pathogens.

  • Grace Lee

    Grace Lee

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Bio Dr. Lee's work focuses on developing quality metrics for use in pediatrics, evaluating the impact of payment policies on health outcomes, preventing healthcare-associated infections, and conducting near real-time surveillance to monitor the safety of medical product use. She served as the Principal Investigator (PI) on the CDC-funded Vaccine Safety Datalink project, Associate Director of the FDA-funded Mini-Sentinel Project, and PI of an AHRQ-funded grant to develop a national surveillance definition for pediatric ventilator-associated events and to identify potential intervention bundles to improve quality of care. She is currently the PI of an AHRQ-funded grant to evaluate the health and economic impact of the CMS Hospital-Acquired Conditions and Value-Based Purchasing policies, which is called the Preventing Avoidable Infectious Complications by Adjusting Payment (PAICAP) study (www.paicap.org). Dr. Lee previously served as a member on the Institute of Medicine Committee (IOM) to Review Priorities in the National Vaccine Plan, the IOM Committee on the Ethical and Scientific Issues in Studying the Safety of Approved Drugs, and the AHRQ Healthcare Safety and Quality Improvement Research Study Section. Currently, she serves as a Board Member for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), and the National Academy of Medicine Board on Population Health and Public Practice, as well as a voting member the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

  • Yvonne Maldonado

    Yvonne Maldonado

    Senior Associate Dean, Faculty Development and Diversity, Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Health Research and Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on epidemiologic aspects of viral vaccines and perinatal HIV infection. This includes the molecular epidemiology of factors affecting the immunogenicity of oral polio vaccine (OPV) in developing areas of the world, and now the epidemiology of transmission and circulation of vaccine derived polioviruses in order to assist in global eradication of polio. I also work in development of methods to prevent breastfeeding transmission of HIV in Africa.

  • Benjamin Pinsky

    Benjamin Pinsky

    Associate Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Development and application of molecular assays for the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases.

  • Philip A. Pizzo, M.D.

    Philip A. Pizzo, M.D.

    David and Susan Heckerman Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Bio Philip Pizzo, MD, is the David and Susan Heckerman Professor and Founding Director of the Stanford Distinguished Careers Institute. Pizzo served as Dean of the Stanford School of Medicine from April 2001 to December 1, 2012, where he was also the Carl and Elizabeth Naumann Professor of Pediatrics and of Microbiology and Immunology. Dr. Pizzo has devoted much of his distinguished medical career to the diagnosis, management, prevention and treatment of childhood cancers and the infectious complications that occur in children whose immune systems are compromised by cancer and AIDS. He has also been a leader in academic medicine, championing programs and policies to improve the future of science, education and healthcare in the US and beyond.
    Pizzo received his MD degree with Honors and Distinction in Research from the University of Rochester in 1970, and completed an internship and residency at Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Boston, a teaching fellowship at Harvard Medical School, and a clinical and research fellowship in pediatric oncology at the National Cancer Institute. Pizzo served as head of the Institute’s infectious disease section, chief of the NCI’s pediatric department, and acting scientific director for NCI’s Division of Clinical Sciences between 1973 and 1996. Before joining Stanford in 2001, he was the physician-in-chief of Children’s Hospital in Boston and Chair of the Department of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, where he was also the Thomas Morgan Rotch Professor of Pediatrics.
    Dr. Pizzo is the author of more than 615 scientific articles and 16 books and monographs, including Principles and Practice of Pediatric Oncology, the Seventh Edition of which was published in 2015.
    Pizzo has received numerous awards and honors, among them the Public Health Service Outstanding Service Medal in 1995, the Barbara Bohen Pfiefer Award for Scientific Excellence in 1991, the Elizabeth Kubler-Ross Award in 2008, the Ronald McDonald Charities “Award of Excellence” in 2009, and the John and Emma Bonica Public Service Award in 2013. He is the 2012 recipient of the John Howland Award, the highest honor for lifetime achievement bestowed by the American Pediatric Society. He has been elected to a number of prestigious organizations and societies, including the Association of American Physicians, the American Society of Clinical Investigation, the American Pediatric Society and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, where he was also elected to the Governing Council. The IOM became the National Academy of Medicine in 2015. He has served as Chair of the Association of Academic Health Centers and Chair of the Council of Deans of the Association of American Medical Colleges, and was elected to the Board of Directors of the American Society for Clinical Oncology and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. He was President of the International Immunocompromised Host Society (1998-2011). He served on the Governing Board for the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine from 2004-2012. In 2009 he was elected to the Board of Trustees of the University of Rochester and the Board of Overseers of Koc University in Istanbul, Turkey. He was a member of the Board of Directors of MRI Interventions (2013-2017) and the Academic Advisory Council for Merritt Hawkins (2015-present). In 2014 he was elected to the Board of Directors of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and in 2015 he was elected to the Board of Directors of Global Blood Therapeutics. He also serves as Editor-in-Chief of Current Opinion in Pediatrics.

  • Charles G. Prober, MD

    Charles G. Prober, MD

    Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education and Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interest is in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of infections in children. Much of this research has focused on viral infections, especially those caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). I have conducted a number of studies concerned with the epidemiology of HSV-2 infections in pregnant women, their partners, and neonates.

  • Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Sr Research Scholar, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Role at Stanford Senior Research Scholar, Global Child Health Program, Department of Pediatrics
    Director, Pediatric Residency Scholarly Concentration Program
    Lecturer, Department of Pediatrics
    Fellow, Center for Innovation in Global Health

  • talal seddik

    talal seddik

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Epidemiology, microbiology and outcomes of bloodstream infection in children with intestinal insufficiency requiring parenteral nutrition

    - The utility of cell-free next generation DNA sequencing for the diagnosis of infectious diseases

  • David Vu

    David Vu

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Bio Dr. Vu is a pediatric infectious diseases specialist who is researching human responses to dengue virus and malaria infections. He performed his undergraduate studies at the University of California, San Diego, and obtained his medical doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He trained in general pediatrics at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland, and in pediatric infectious diseases at Emory University School of Medicine. His present studies on pediatric dengue and malaria co-infection are supported by an NIAID Career Development Award (K23 AI127909) and a Instructor K Award Support Program Award from the Maternal & Child Health Research Institute and Department of Pediatrics.