School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 106 Results

  • Leah Backhus

    Leah Backhus

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Thoracic Surgery) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Bio Leah Backhus trained in general surgery at the University of Southern California and cardiothoracic surgery at the University of California Los Angeles. She practices at Stanford Hospital and is Chief of Thoracic Surgery at the VA Palo Alto. Her surgical practice consists of general thoracic surgery with special emphasis on thoracic oncology and minimally invasive surgical techniques. She is also involved in research with the Thoracic Surgical Health Services Research group, and has grant funding through the Veterans Affairs Administration. Her current research interests are in imaging surveillance following treatment for lung cancer and cancer survivorship. She is a member of the National Lung Cancer Roundtable of the American Cancer Society serving as Chair of the Task Group on Lung Cancer in Women. She also serves as a professional member of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Advisory Panel on Improving Healthcare Systems. As an educator, Dr. Backhus is the Associate Program Director for the Thoracic Track Residency and serves on the ACGME Residency Review Committee for Thoracic Surgery which is the accrediting body for all cardiothoracic surgery training programs in the US.

  • Edward Bender

    Edward Bender

    Clinical Associate Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Edward Bender specializes in the treatment of adult cardiac abnormalities, including ischemic heart disease, structural and valvular disease, and arrhythmias. Additionally, he has an interest and expertise in General Thoracic and Vascular surgery. Dr. Bender currently works with organizations within the medical community to develop software to aid in the teaching and practice of medicine.

  • Mark Berry, MD

    Mark Berry, MD

    Mylavarapu Rogers Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Berry joined the Division of Thoracic Surgery at Stanford in August 2014. He came to Stanford from Duke University, where he had most recently served as Associate Professor. He received his medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine after receiving bachelors and masters degrees in Electrical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his residency in Cardiothoracic Surgery at Duke University Medical Center after performing a residency in General Surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. His Cardiothoracic Surgical training included a year dedicated to Minimally Invasive General Thoracic Surgery, a period that also included an American Association for Thoracic Surgery sponsored Traveling Fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh.

    Dr. Berry practices all aspects of thoracic surgery, including procedures for benign and malignant conditions of the lung, esophagus, and mediastinum. He has a particular interest in minimally invasive techniques, and has extensive experience in treating thoracic surgical conditions using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS), laparoscopic, robotic, endoscopic, and bronchoscopic approaches. He serves as the co-Director of the Stanford Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery Center (SMITS), and has both directed and taught in several minimally invasive thoracic surgery courses.

    Dr. Berry also has a Masters of Health Sciences in Clinical Research from Duke University. His clinical research activities mirror his clinical interests and activities in optimizing short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with thoracic surgical conditions. He has more than sixty peer-reviewed publications, most of which are related to both the use of minimally invasive thoracic surgical techniques as well as evaluating outcomes after treatment of thoracic malignancies. His clinical practice and his research both focus on choosing the most appropriate treatment and approach for patients based on the individual characteristics of the patient and their disease process.

  • Thomas Burdon

    Thomas Burdon

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Adult Cardiac Surgery) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests New technologies in the area of catheters, clamps, and, visualization devices for aid in cardiac surgery; distribution of, cardioplegia, both anterograde and retrograde as determined by, techniques in technetium pyro-phosphate scans; glucose insulin, potassium as an adjunct in cardiac surgery.

  • Peter Chiu

    Peter Chiu

    Resident in Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Randomized control trials are extraordinarily expensive in cardiac surgery. As such, these are not always feasible. My research is focused on applying causal inference techniques to observational data in order to better evaluate the comparative effectiveness of competing treatment methods in the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  • Zhe Cui

    Zhe Cui

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Before joining Stanford, I was a research associate at Child & Family Research Institute in British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada. I have obtained my honors B.MedSc. from the University of Western Ontario with high distinction, and earned a master’s degree in pharmacogenomics from the University of Toronto, and a Ph.D. degree in cardiovascular pharmacology from the University of British Columbia.

    My on-going research at Stanford has a focus on understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to the progression of thoracic aneurysm and aortic dissection in connective tissue disorders, including Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, using both transgenic mouse models and a vascular model derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). I previously developed a novel quantitative analysis of elastin using multiphoton microscopy that could lead to an early diagnostic method of Marfan syndrome. Further, my ultrasound study strongly supports the potential use of doxycycline for the prevention of Marfan-linked aneurysm.

  • Seraina Dual

    Seraina Dual

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Seraina A. Dual is a postodoctoral fellow at the departments of the Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford Medicine and Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University, mentored by Prof. Doff McElHinney and Prof. Alison Marsden respectively. She graduated with a bachelor's degree from the Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich) in Mechanical Engineering in 20, a master's degree at ETH Zurich in Mechanical Engineering with a specialization in robotics and biomedical application with Prof. Roger Gassert, and her Dr. of science at ETH Zurich in Mechanical Engineering with Prof. Mirko Meboldt. During this time, she spent some time with Prof. Ellen Kuhl at Stanford University (Bsc.), with Prof. Theo Chee Leong at National University of Singapore (Msc.), and with Prof. Christopher Hayward at the St. Vincent's Hospital in Sydney (Dsc.). Her work focuses on developing dynamic systems, algorithms, and sensors inspired by her background in engineering and control methodology to either improve our pathophysiological understanding of disease or enable physiological interaction of patients with intelligent medical devices.