School of Medicine


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  • Sanno Zack

    Sanno Zack

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Zack is involved with ongoing research related to the treatment of adolescent and adult trauma (Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - TF-CBT; Prolonged Exposure - PE), and the effective provision of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) to adolescent girls and women with disorder of emotion regulation. She additionally studies Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for adolescent girls with anxiety. More broadly she is interested in the impact of Evidenced Based Treatments on improving quality of life, and helping individuals find the right match for clinical care. Research is conducted through the Early Life Stress and Pediatric Anxiety Disorders Program at Stanford Children's Hospital and the Stanford Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program.

  • Ken Zafren, MD

    Ken Zafren, MD

    Clinical Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests High altitude medicine, AMS, HACE, HAPE, cold injuries, including hypothermia and frostbite, emergency medical services, wilderness medicine, mountain rescue, thrombosis, international medicine, travel medicine, emergency medicine, resuscitation

  • Gregory Zaharchuk

    Gregory Zaharchuk

    Associate Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Imaging of cerebral hemodynamics with MRI and CT
    Noninvasive oxygenation measurement with MRI
    Clinical imaging of cerebrovascular disease
    Imaging of cervical artery dissection
    MR/PET in Neuroradiology
    Resting-state fMRI for perfusion imaging and stroke

  • Junaid Zaman

    Junaid Zaman

    Postdoctoral Research fellow, Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The commonest heart rhythm disorder is atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is a problem as it can lead to strokes and heart attacks. It is difficult to cure, with many tablets required that are only partially effective. A new way of selecting areas for ablation (burning) focusses on rotors - areas where electrical waves spin like a hurricane. At Stanford, I am working with the developer of this technique to improve understanding of why these occur at certain sites and how better to identify these.

  • Raiyan T. Zaman

    Raiyan T. Zaman

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My academic and scientific training has been focused on design and development of novel fiber-optic based biomedical instrumentation to improve the detection and, intervention, and treatment of various diseases. Currently, I am on a Western State Affiliate Winter 2013 Postdoctoral Fellowship from the American Heart Association (AHA) at the Stanford University School of Medicine in the laboratory of Professors Lei Xing and Michael V. McConnell, where I developed a novel fiber-optic catheter based optical imaging system to detect vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in carotid arteries. In this work, I developed a novel scintillating balloon which can detect the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque from stable plaque with high sensitivity after 18F-FDG uptake by the macrophages within the thin cap fibro atheroma (TCFA). The TCFA causes 60-70% of acute coronary syndrome that leads to sudden cardiac death and myocardial infarction.

  • Roham Zamanian, MD, FCCP

    Roham Zamanian, MD, FCCP

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Development and evaluation of prognostic and diagnostic integral biomarkers in PAH.

    2. Prevalence and Treatment of Insulin Resistance in PAH.

    3. Role of inflammation and proteomic signature in PAH

    4. Development of novel therapeutics (bench to bedside) including FK506 & Elastase Inhibition in PAH.

    5. Assessment of Vasoreactivity (gain and loss) in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    6. Assessment of microvascular function in PAH.

  • Marta Gaia Zanchi

    Marta Gaia Zanchi

    Lecturer, Surgery

    Bio I am the creator and Lead Director of the Byers Center for Biodesign's course and project immersion program "Biodesign for Mobile Health"​ (BMH) examining the emerging mobile health industry (2012-present). This diverse, interactive, interdisciplinary, team and project-oriented course has been named by Stanford's Bioengineering "one of the flagship courses of our Department" and has trained nearly 200 students in a process of health technology innovation grounded on the understanding of contemporary Mobile Health needs.

    Currently Faculty member (Lecturer) at Stanford University in the School of Medicine, I am working with the Byers Center for Biodesign community under the direct supervision of Paul Yock, MD, Director of the Center and Founding Co-Chair of Stanford's Department of Bioengineering.

    In addition to my role as Faculty member and course Lead Director, I am a member of the Biodesign Leadership Group and a mentor to both Biodesign Fellows and students from the School of Medicine, all major Engineering schools and the Graduate School of Business. Together with a mHealth Advisory Group of thought leaders at Stanford, I help inform Stanford School of Medicine's thinking and strategy around Mobile Health to accelerate projects and foster quality research.

    Relevant links:
    Biodesign for Mobile Health (on Canvas): canvas.stanford.edu/courses/44010
    Byers Center for Biodesign: biodesign.stanford.edu/bdn/index.jsp

    At Stanford, I also have the pleasure to advise on the board of SHIFT, a student initiative aiming to promote and cultivate health innovation on campus by creating a forum for developers, entrepreneurs, and pre-health students to collaborate. A motivated leadership team envisions the group as a platform that connects and empowers students with resources and opportunities to innovate in healthcare. SHIFT fulfills its mission through open roundtable discussions, the TreeHacks Health hackathon and a fellowship program that pairs students as health++ fellows with early-stage companies or faculty-sponsored projects.

    Follow this link to learn more:
    SHIFT Health + Tech @Stanford: shift.stanford.edu

    When I am not at Stanford, you'll find me consulting, advising or otherwise engaging with and learning from the startup community of Silicon Valley. I am the Managing Director of Medinnovo LLC, advisory board (AB) member of many exciting privately-held companies, and founders' board of advisors (FBA) member at StartX MED, a startup accelerator.

    And, more links:
    My LinkedIN Profile: linkedin.com/in/mgzanchi
    Medinnovo LLC: medinnovo.com
    StartX Accelerator: startx.com

    "Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn."
    — Benjamin Franklin

  • Dick Zare

    Dick Zare

    Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science and Professor, by courtesy, of Physics

    Bio My research group is exploring a variety of topics that range from the basic understanding of chemical reaction dynamics to the nature of the chemical contents of single cells.

    Under thermal conditions nature seems to hide the details of how elementary reactions occur through a series of averages over reagent velocity, internal energy, impact parameter, and orientation. To discover the effects of these variables on reactivity, it is necessary to carry out studies of chemical reactions far from equilibrium in which the states of the reactants are more sharply restricted and can be varied in a controlled manner. My research group is attempting to meet this tough experimental challenge through a number of laser techniques that prepare reactants in specific quantum states and probe the quantum state distributions of the resulting products. It is our belief that such state-to-state information gives the deepest insight into the forces that operate in the breaking of old bonds and the making of new ones.

    Space does not permit a full description of these projects, and I earnestly invite correspondence. The following examples are representative:

    The simplest of all neutral bimolecular reactions is the exchange reaction H H2 -> H2 H. We are studying this system and various isotopic cousins using a tunable UV laser pulse to photodissociate HBr (DBr) and hence create fast H (D) atoms of known translational energy in the presence of H2 and/or D2 and using a laser multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer to detect the nascent molecular products in a quantum-state-specific manner by means of an imaging technique. It is expected that these product state distributions will provide a key test of the adequacy of various advanced theoretical schemes for modeling this reaction.

    Analytical efforts involve the use of capillary zone electrophoresis, two-step laser desorption laser multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We believe these methods can revolutionize trace analysis, particularly of biomolecules in cells.