School of Medicine


Showing 1-19 of 19 Results

  • Francisco Beca

    Francisco Beca

    Resident in Pathology

    Bio I am a physician-scientist and currently a Breast Pathology Fellow (AP-3, Anatomic Pathology only program) at the Department of Pathology of the Stanford University School of Medicine/Stanford Healthcare with a particular clinical interest in Breast Pathology and Molecular Genetic Pathology and a research interest in the development of new quantitative approaches to pathology to accurately predict the development of cancer, correctly classify tumors by prognosis and predict response to cancer therapy, leveraging biomedical informatics and computational pathology tools to inquire large datasets of clinical and genomics data, mostly focusing on breast cancer.

  • Erna Forgo

    Erna Forgo

    Resident in Pathology

    Bio Dr. Erna Forgó is an Anatomic and Clinical Pathology Resident at Stanford University School of Medicine with special interests in Gastrointestinal & Hepatobiliary Pathology and Gynecologic Pathology.

  • Alex Gitlin

    Alex Gitlin

    Resident in Pathology

    Bio Alex Gitlin, M.D., Ph.D. is currently a 3rd year resident in clinical pathology at Stanford University. Prior to Stanford, Alex received his M.D. from Weill Cornell Medicine (2017) and his Ph.D. from Rockefeller University (2016) as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) at the Tri-Institutional M.D.-Ph.D. program. During his graduate training, Dr. Gitlin focused on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying germinal center reactions and the formation of long-lived humoral immunity. His work elucidated the mechanisms by which CD4+ T cells induce selective clonal expansion of germinal center B cells during the immune response. Currently, Alex's clinical and research interests lie in understanding how inflammatory signaling pathways regulate different forms of programmed cell death and inflammation.

  • Chris C.S. Hsiung

    Chris C.S. Hsiung

    Resident in Pathology

    Bio Chris Hsiung, M.D., Ph.D., is a resident physician in Clinical Pathology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Chris completed his M.D. (2017) and Ph.D.(2016) in Cell and Molecular Biology through the Medical Scientist Training Program at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, where he was co-advised by Dr. Gerd Blobel and Dr. Arjun Raj. Chris's PhD work uncovered several molecular aspects of genome accessibility and transcriptional control during mitosis, lending insights into how transcriptional states are propagated despite microscopic chromosome condensation and transcriptional silencing during mitosis. Currently, Chris is interested in understanding the gene regulatory networks that underlie normal and diseased tissues, and applying the knowledge gained toward clinical diagnostics and therapeutics.

  • Jonathan Lavezo

    Jonathan Lavezo

    Fellow in Pathology

    Bio A native of Texas, Jonathan attended the University of North Texas in his hometown of Denton. After obtaining a double major in chemistry and biochemistry, he moved to the west Texas town of El Paso to attend the Paul L. Foster School of Medicine. Here is where he developed a deep interest in neuroendocrine disorders, in particular pituitary adenomas. He is currently an anatomic pathology resident at Stanford University and will begin his neuropathology fellowship starting in July of 2017.

  • Atif Saleem

    Atif Saleem

    Resident in Pathology

    Bio Dr. Atif Saleem is a fourth-year resident in anatomic and clinical pathology with interests in global health, dermatopathology, and hematopathology.

  • Oscar Silva MD PhD

    Oscar Silva MD PhD

    Resident in Pathology

    Bio Oscar Silva, MD, PhD is currently in his final year of training at Stanford University which has included anatomic and clinical pathology residency and hematopathology fellowship. Prior to Stanford, Dr. Silva received his MD and PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles – California Institute of Technology Medical Scientist Training Program (UCLA-Caltech MSTP). During his graduate training, Dr. Silva focused on T cell receptor signaling driving cytotoxic T cell immune responses. Dr. Silva’s current interests include the diagnosis of difficult hematolymphoid neoplasms and the identification and characterization of markers of diagnostic and prognostic importance in hematolymphoid neoplasia.