School of Medicine


Showing 1-100 of 113 Results

  • Anna Badner

    Anna Badner

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio I am currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Stanford University in the lab of Dr. Erin Gibson. I completed my PhD at the Institute of Medical Science in the University of Toronto (2018), under the supervision of Dr. Michael Fehlings, where my thesis was focused on the peripheral inflammatory response in neurotrauma and application of immunomodulatory cell therapies to target this pathology. I subsequently spent two years as a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, University of California-Irvine (UCI), transplanting various sources of neural stem cells for traumatic brain injury.

    Throughout my training, I have found that exogenous stem cell transplantation alters behavior of endogenous progenitor populations and, in many cases, this interaction drives recovery. Therefore, in the context of neurotrauma and neurodegeneration, my research interests lie broadly between the extrinsic and intrinsic control mechanisms of endogenous central nervous system precursor cells. Specifically, I hope to understand their circadian as well as immune-mediated activation potential for repair and/or regeneration in disease.

  • Jean Marie Batail

    Jean Marie Batail

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio I am a MD/PhD postdoctoral scholar from Rennes in France. Before arriving in Stanford, I worked in both clinical and research fields. I leaded a unit specialized in neuropsychiatric treatment resistant disorders (mainly depression, Parkinson Disease with psychiatric comorbidities and obsessive-compulsive disorder) with two residents. In this unit, I used and coordinated neuromodulations techniques such as repetititive Trancranial Magnetic Stimulation, Electroconvulsive therapy, and Deep Brain Stimulation. In the research part of my activity, my work focused on biomarkers of poor outcome of depressive disorder using clinical/neuropsychological/brain imaging assessments. In addition, I conducted research on neurofeedback applied to depression. Apart to be involved in the national coordination of this topic for psychiatric diseases (Neurofeedback section of French Association of Biological Psychiatry and Neuropsychopharmacology https://www.afpbn.org/sections/next/), I was actively involved in the development of a new generation of brain-computer interface therapies based on joint bimodal EEG-fMRI neurofeedback. In this project, I leaded the clinical research applying this new technology to depression. I am very interested in working on biomarkers of neuropsychiatric disorders and the development of personalized-targeting neuromodulation techniques.

  • Edith Brignoni Perez

    Edith Brignoni Perez

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Edith Brignoni Pérez completed her Ph.D. in Neuroscience at Georgetown University in June 2019. Her doctoral work focused on investigating the neurofunctional bases of reading in bilingual-biliterate children and adults, under the mentorship of Dr. Guinevere F. Eden at the Center for the Study of Learning. Edith used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether bilinguals rely on a different functional brain system to read words in English compared (1) to monolinguals and (2) to reading words in Spanish.

    She joined the Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics research unit in July 2019 as a postdoctoral fellow under the co-mentorship of Drs. Katherine Travis (Pediatrics), Dr. Heidi Feldman (Pediatrics), and Ian Gotlib (Psychology). Some of Edith’s current research interests include how the brain’s white matter microstructure and developmental outcomes relate to one another, particularly in infants born prematurely. She is also interested in changes to brain structure and function following early intervention of language exposure, and long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes relationship with early-life stress.

  • Hyesang Chang

    Hyesang Chang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research aims to understand neural representations and brain networks that support learning and academic achievement across development to bridge the gaps between cognitive and developmental science, neuroscience, and education. I am interested in the interplay between multiple cognitive and affective systems, and neuroplasticity of these systems that give rise to individual differences in how children acquire knowledge and skills in domains important for academic and professional success.

  • Samir Chowdhury

    Samir Chowdhury

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio I am an applied mathematician trained in computational topology, geometry, and data analysis. At Stanford, I am working on developing new methods for analyzing and fingerprinting neuroimaging data and in obtaining meaningful clinical insights from such analysis.

    Prior to Stanford, I completed my PhD in the Department of Mathematics at The Ohio State University under the supervision of Facundo Mémoli. My thesis was titled "Metric and Topological Approaches to Network Data Analysis".

  • John Coetzee

    John Coetzee

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am presently engaged in developing innovative treatments for traumatic brain injury in Dr. Maheen Adamson's lab at the Palo Alto VA, and for depression in the Brain Stimulation Lab at Stanford.

  • Eleanor Cole

    Eleanor Cole

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio My research has focused on differences in brain activity, structure and functional connectivity in various conditions; sensory deficits, neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions. I have experience with a range of neuroscience techniques including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electroencephalography (EEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electromyography (EMG). My PhD research focused on neural differences in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). I completed my PhD within three years; completing four research projects across three different labs, including working with a world leader in ASD research, Prof. Peter Enticott, in Melbourne, Australia. Alongside my PhD, I worked in an outpatient clinic alongside clinical psychiatrists and coordinated a multi-award winning mental health campaign. My interest in psychiatric research led me to take a postdoctoral position in the Psychiatry Department at Stanford, developing an accelerated brain stimulation therapy for adults with treatment-resistant depression and suicidal ideation. This position also involves utilizing the latest neural targeting methods for rTMS using functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI), examining neural connectivity changes associated with antidepressant responses and identifying potential biomarkers of antidepressant response. I am fully committed to a career in research, particularly research aimed at identifying the neural basis of psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders in order to both develop new treatments and improve existing treatments for mental illnesses.

  • Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eshel (he/him/his) is a psychiatrist and instructor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His clinical focus is the full-spectrum mental health care of sexual and gender minorities, with particular interest in depression, anxiety, and the complex effects of trauma in this population. He works in collaboration with other primary care and mental health providers at the new Stanford LGBTQ+ program.

    His research interests include the use of optogenetic, electrophysiological, neuroimaging, and behavioral approaches to probe the neural circuits of reward processing, decision making, and social behavior. He recently won a multi-year grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to study the neural circuits of frustration and aggression.

    Dr. Eshel has published articles on topics such as the role of dopamine in learning, the neuroscience of irritability, LGBTQ health, reward and punishment processing in depression, behavioral predictors of substance use among adolescents, and the mechanism of transcranial magnetic stimulation. His work has appeared in Nature, Science, Nature Neuroscience, Annual Review of Neuroscience, JAMA, JAMA Psychiatry, Neuropsychopharmacology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Journal of Neuroscience. He is also the author of the book Learning: The Science Inside, a publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    He has delivered presentations on anger expression in patients with PTSD, the neural circuitry of learning, dopamine prediction errors, and LGBTQ-related topics at meetings of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, Society of Biological Psychiatry, and Association of American Medical Colleges, among others. He is also an associate editor of the Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health, and an ad-hoc reviewer for numerous publications including Science, JAMA Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, and Current Biology.


    Dr. Eshel has won honors for his scholarship and advocacy, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Outstanding Resident Award from the National Institute of Mental Health, the Science and SciLifeLab Grand Prize for Young Scientists, and the National LGBT Health Achievement Award.

    He is a member of the American Psychiatric Association, Society of Biological Psychiatry, Association of Gay & Lesbian Psychiatrists, Society for Neuroscience, and other professional associations. He is also an advocate for LGBTQ rights, recently serving as the LGBTQ Chair of the Stanford Graduate Medical Education Diversity Committee.

    Prior to Stanford, Dr. Eshel trained and conducted research at the National Institutes of Health, Princeton University, the World Health Organization, University College London, and Harvard University.

  • Mohsen Fathzadeh

    Mohsen Fathzadeh

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have been venturing the career of characterizing insulin resistance genes, as the underlying risk factor of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. My earlier postdoctoral fellowship at the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine involved the functional genomic of diabetes and glycemic traits loci by using deep phenotyping approach i.e., multi-OMICs and transgenic mice.
    At my current research, I am harnessing the epigenomic analysis in the global birth cohorts. I aim to unravel the origin of insulin resistance in the etiology of diabetes, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's diseases. Certain ethnicities develop insulin resistance and diabetes even with the normal weight and at younger ages. Therefore, it is essential to distinguish genes that predispose high-risk individuals to insulin resistance in the presence or absence (lipodystrophy) of obesity.
    The main plan of my research is to expand follow-up studies on the global birth cohorts from diverse ethnic groups to eventually enable precise screening. This aim is aligned with the missions of Stanford Long-Range Planning and Precision Health to diminish health disparities. Therefore, our research supports the University mission of deep phenotyping and care of diverse patients and populations. These studies have the potential to specify mechanistic and causality insights from the drivers of diabetes and insulin resistance risk in different ethnicities. The ultimate goal of my research is to pave the way for opportunities to prevent insulin resistance as early as 10-20 years before the onset of diabetes and the age-related adverse outcomes such as vascular dementia and to reduce the widening ethnic inequalities.
    My overall goal is to promote the field of global precision medicine with an eye toward the minority and under-represented communities in genomic medicine.

  • Laura Michele Hack

    Laura Michele Hack

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Laura Hack is a Postdoctoral Fellow and Clinical Instructor under the mentorship of Drs. Leanne Williams, Alan Schatzberg, and Ruth O’Hara. She is a translational clinician with a research passion for integrating multiple types of biological and environmental data using advanced analytic techniques into a neuroscience-based taxonomy of mood, anxiety, and stressor-related disorders. Laura envisions herself as a ‘psychiatrist of the future,’ incorporating genetic information, brain imaging, blood-based markers, and data from wearable sensors into diagnostic and treatment decisions to help relieve the suffering that arises from our current trial-and-error approach.

  • Alesha Heath

    Alesha Heath

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Dr. Alesha Heath is a Postdoctoral Scholar at Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford School of Medicine and the MIRECC the VA Palo Alto. She earned her PhD from the University of Western Australia and Sorbonne University.

    Dr. Heath's research has been primarily focused on the mechanisms and applications of brain stimulation therapies, in particular repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Her research involves both basic and clinical components with the aim of improving the efficacy of these therapies for the treatment of disorders such as depression and Alzheimer's disease.

  • John P. Hegarty II

    John P. Hegarty II

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Child Psychiatry

    Bio The overarching goal of my research is to develop objective biomarkers for individuals with psychiatric and neurological conditions in order to improve biologically-based diagnosis and advance the development of precision medicine for mental health. Biologically-based diagnosis and treatment are extremely limited for some psychiatric conditions, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but also critically-needed to increase early identification and improve treatment outcomes. My early career training has focused on developing expertise in non-invasive neuroimaging approaches for examining participants ranging from young children to adults and my research has focused on identifying the neurobiology underlying typical and atypical neurodevelopment.

    Thus far in my early research career, my primary contributions to science fall within four major categories:
    1) identifying the neural correlates of different cognitive and behavioral deficits, 2) investigating the neurobiological substrates of treatment response, 3) examining the etiological factors that contribute to atypical brain development in children with autism, and 4) summarizing and increasing accessibility to autism-related research. My earliest research investigated the neurobiology associated with the cognitive deficits of alexithymia, dyslexia, and stress to further develop theories of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to differences in cognitive and behavioral processing. My subsequent dissertation research, in which I began to focus on neurodevelopmental disorders, examined the neural correlates of treatment response to beta-blockers in adults with ASD and also assessed the contribution of cerebellar circuits to autism-related symptoms, which is well-supported from postmortem studies but understudied in clinical populations. During my postdoctoral training, I have been further developing skills for working with young children with and without neurodevelopmental disorders as well as utilizing advanced neuroimaging and neurophysiological approaches to examine the biological mechanisms underlying different types of cognitive and behavioral symptoms. My most recent research has focused on examining the neural correlates of response to behavioral interventions as well as examining the etiological factors that contribute to atypical brain development in twins with autism. The independent line of research that I will continue to develop in my research lab will aim to improve our understanding of typical and atypical brain development and identify objective biomarkers for the application of precision medicine. Overall, my track record exemplifies that I am highly dedicated to improving biologically-based treatment approaches and am uniquely-qualified to develop this line of research based on my neuroimaging expertise, incorporation of basic research findings into clinical studies, and extensive experience collaborating with clinicians and other researchers to conduct novel biological and treatment-related research in pediatric, adolescent, adult, and geriatric populations.

  • Agnieszka Kalinowski

    Agnieszka Kalinowski

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio I am a translational physician-scientist focused on studying the role of the immune system in patients with schizophrenia. My work spans careful clinical characterization of patients to understanding mechanisms in basic science model systems, allowing to provide mechanistic understanding to observations in clinical samples. Currently, I'm focused on deciphering the role of the complement system and how the known genetic risk translates into pathophysiological disease mechanisms. I hope that this work will pave the way to novel treatment strategies.

  • Anna Mathia Klawonn

    Anna Mathia Klawonn

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research evolves around deciphering the neural circuits of affective disorders. I am particularly interested in how affective and motivational states relate to each other and are encoded in the mesolimbic reward system. More specifically, I would like to find the neurocircuitry responsible for pathologies such as drug addiction, depression and negative affect during inflammatory disorders, in the hope that we can find better treatments against these.

  • Devinder Kumar

    Devinder Kumar

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Devinder Kumar is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Medicine, Stanford University. His research centers around Deep Learning and its application in Computer Vision, Medical Imaging & Cognitive Neuroscience. Specifically, the research problem he is currently focusing on is: How to make interpretable computational AI models for various psychiatric disorders.

    He obtained is PhD (Jan '17 - Jan '20) while working on explainable AI (XAI) at VIP lab - University of Waterloo and Machine Learning Research Group - University of Guelph where he was supervised by Dr. Alexander Wong (UWaterloo/ Canada research chair, AI & Medical Imaging) and Dr. Graham Taylor (UGuelph/ Vector Inst./ Canada research chair, ML Systems).

  • Severine Lannoy

    Severine Lannoy

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio I studied Psychology at Catholic University of Louvain (Belgium). I am a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University and my professional focus is on alcohol consumption in young people, the predisposing or vulnerability factors and the related consequences at behavioral and brain levels.

  • Melanie Lean

    Melanie Lean

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Melanie Lean, Clin.Psych.D. is a post-doctoral research fellow in the INSPIRE clinic. Trained at University College London, Dr Lean is competent in multiple therapeutic modalities, namely Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) (including CBT for psychosis), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Systemic Family Therapy. She has experience working in co-produced services in the UK at the mental health charity, MIND in Camden, including co-facilitating Hearing Voices and Voice Collective groups to support young people who hear, see or sense things that other’s don’t. Dr Lean has over 15 years’ experience in clinical research, nine of those in mental health working across a range of settings and populations. She has specialized knowledge in self-management and peer support interventions for people with severe mental illness and has experience working alongside service user researchers in the evaluation and delivery of study interventions.

  • Rihui Li

    Rihui Li

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Rihui completed his PhD in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Houston. His PhD work primarily focused on applying multimodal brain imaging techniques (EEG and fNIRS) to explore and characterize brain dynamics associated with various brain disorders (Alzheimer's Disease and Stroke). Currently, Rihui is involved in several projects: 1) investigating dynamic functional connectivity and brain states during social interactions using fNIRS-based hyperscanning technique; 2) developing multimodal approaches to characterize the brain alterations in patients with Fragile X and establish robust risk-predictive models for the early management of Fragile X Syndrome.

  • Ruizhe Liu

    Ruizhe Liu

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio 2014 - 2020Graduate student, Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, U.S.
    2009 - 2012 M.S. in Psychology. School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University (BNU), Beijing, China
    2005 - 2009 B.S. in Psychology. Department of Psychology, East China Normal University (ECNU), Shanghai, China

  • Kathryn S. Macia

    Kathryn S. Macia

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Kathryn Macia is a postdoctoral fellow in VA's Advanced Fellowship Program in Mental Illness Research and Treatment at the National Center for PTSD, Dissemination & Training Division, VA Palo Alto Health Care System and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University. Her research interests focus on traumatic stress, substance use, emotion regulation, social support, interpersonal functioning, and homelessness among veterans and vulnerable populations, as well as advanced statistical methods.

  • Valentina Martinez Damonte

    Valentina Martinez Damonte

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio I have come to Stanford University to increase my knowledge and acquire new skills in neuroscience and synaptic plasticity. My interest in the brain arises from its unique complexity and malleability to shape different behavioral outcomes. My PhD was aimed at studying the modulation of voltage-gated calcium channels in primary neuronal cultures and brain slices by a GPCR involved in energy homeostasis and memory. At this stage I am willing to use my expertise in electrophysiology and subcellular neuroscience to explore the plasticity of inhibitory afferents into the VTA and its relation with stress-induced relapse.

    I also believe that science is a powerful tool to explore and change the world, and hence I am highly interested in the ideas behind science policies as well as in understanding how science shapes the reality we live in, and the responsibility we have as scientists.

  • Zui Narita

    Zui Narita

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Zui is a Board Certified Psychiatrist of Japan, who is interested in two major research topics. First, Zui is eager to understand how brain stimulation techniques (e.g., TMS, DBS, and tDCS) might improve the functions and symptoms in psychiatric disorders. Second, Zui wishes to know how biological outcomes such as brain images may predict the onset and severity of mental disorders, in the context of biomarkers for these conditions. Thus, his postgraduate training has laid the foundation for these goals. During his time in Japan, Zui conducted clinical trials that examined the effect of tDCS in patients with schizophrenia. After coming to the US, he learned advanced statistical methods in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Zui joined the Brain Stimulation Lab in 2020 and is currently engaged in clinical trials for OCD and bipolar disorder.

  • Hannah Elizabeth Raila

    Hannah Elizabeth Raila

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Dr. Hannah Raila's training focuses the "diet" of visual information that we consume as we navigate the world (e.g., do we see the crack in the wall, or do we pass by it unaware?), the factors that predispose us to detect this emotional information in our environment the first place, and how this diet of information influences our emotions. To study our visual biases and how they relate to how we feel, she leverages tools from cognitive psychology - including eye tracking and continuous flash suppression (CFS).

    As a postdoctoral researcher in Dr. Carolyn Rodriguez's lab, she is particularly interested in links between visual attention and emotion in OCD, and whether biased visual processing of obsession-related cues contributes to symptom severity.

  • Leonardo Tozzi

    Leonardo Tozzi

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Dr. Leonardo Tozzi graduated as a Medical Doctor from Pisa University and Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies in 2013. Immediately thereafter, his interest in the investigation of mood disorders using Magnetic Resonance Imaging led him to join the R'Birth Consortium, a Marie Curie Initial Training Network spanning across 7 European countries. In 2017, he was awarded his Ph.D. from Trinity College Dublin for his research on the interaction between genetic risk factors, epigenetic modifications and environmental stressors as predictors of structural and functional brain changes related to Major Depression.
    Dr. Tozzi joined Williams PANLab at Stanford University at the start of 2018 as a post-doctoral fellow within the framework of the Human Connectome Project. His goal is to use functional and structural connectivity analyses to develop precision psychiatry metrics related to the biology underpinning anxiety and depression. By combining connectomics and predictive algorithms, he also aims to assess the potential of these measures for clinical applications such as guiding treatment selection and estimating therapy response.

  • Jason M Tucciarone

    Jason M Tucciarone

    Postdoctoral Medical Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Jason received his bachelors degree in biology and philosophy from Union College. He spent three years as a Post-Baccalaureate IRTA fellow at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke investigating and developing MRI reportable contrast agents to map neuronal connectivity. Following this he entered the Medical Scientist Training Program (MD/PhD) at SUNY Stony Brook University. There he completed a doctoral dissertation in neuroscience under the mentorship Dr. Josh Huang at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. His thesis work employed mouse genetic dissections of excitatory and inhibitory cortical circuits with a focus on the circuitry of chandelier inhibitory interneurons in prefrontal cortex. He is currently a resident physician in Stanford Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences’ research residency track. His research interests include uncovering circuit mechanisms of psychiatric disorders with hopeful applications to novel therapeutics.

Latest information on COVID-19