School of Medicine


Showing 1-33 of 33 Results

  • Justin P. Annes M.D., Ph.D.

    Justin P. Annes M.D., Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The ANNES LABORATORY of Molecular Endocrinology: Leveraging Chemical Biology to Treat Endocrine Disorders

    DIABETES
    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing at a staggering rate. By the year 2050 an astounding 25% of Americans will be diabetic. The goal of my research is to uncover therapeutic strategies to stymie the ensuing diabetes epidemic. To achieve this goal we have developed a variety of innovate experimental approaches to uncover novel approaches to curing diabetes.

    (1) Beta-Cell Regeneration: Diabetes results from either an absolute or relative deficiency in insulin production. Our therapeutic strategy is to stimulate the regeneration of insulin-producing beta-cells to enhance an individual’s insulin secretion capacity. We have developed a unique high-throughput chemical screening platform which we use to identify small molecules that promote beta-cell growth. This work has led to the identification of key molecular pathways (therapeutic targets) and candidate drugs that promote the growth and regeneration of islet beta-cells. Our goal is to utilize these discoveries to treat and prevent diabetes.

    (2) The Metabolic Syndrome: A major cause of the diabetes epidemic is the rise in obesity which leads to a cluster of diabetes- and cardiovascular disease-related metabolic abnormalities that shorten life expectancy. These physiologic aberrations are collectively termed the Metabolic Syndrome (MS). My laboratory has developed an original in vivo screening platform t to identify novel hormones that influence the behaviors (excess caloric consumption, deficient exercise and disrupted sleep-wake cycles) and the metabolic abnormalities caused by obesity. We aim to manipulate these hormone levels to prevent the development and detrimental consequences of the MS.

    HEREDIATY PARAGAGLIOMA SYNDROME
    The Hereditary Paraganglioma Syndrome (hPGL) is a rare genetic cancer syndrome that is most commonly caused by a defect in mitochondrial metabolism. Our goal is to understand how altered cellular metabolism leads to the development of cancer. Although hPGL is uncommon, it serves as an excellent model for the abnormal metabolic behavior displayed by nearly all cancers. Our goal is to develop novel therapeutic strategies that target the abnormal behavior of cancer cells. In the laboratory we have developed hPGL mouse models and use high throughput chemical screening to identify the therapeutic susceptibilities that result from the abnormal metabolic behavior of cancer cells.

    As a physician scientist trained in clinical genetics I have developed expertise in hereditary endocrine disorders and devoted my efforts to treating families affected by the hPGL syndrome. By leveraging our laboratory expertise in the hPGL syndrome, our care for individuals who have inherited the hPGL syndrome is at the forefront of medicine. Our goal is to translate our laboratory discoveries to the treatment of affected families.

  • Danit Ariel

    Danit Ariel

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    Bio Danit Ariel, MD MS, is double board certified in Internal Medicine and Endocrinology. Dr. Ariel graduated from UC Davis School of Medicine. She then completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Stanford and a fellowship and post-doctorate in Endocrinology and Metabolism at Stanford before joining the faculty at Stanford.

    Dr. Ariel practices general endocrinology, with a special interest in thyroid disorders, menopause, LGBTQ+ health, and transgender medicine amongst others.

    She believes in practicing compassionate care: in listening to her patients’ concerns, respecting their values, communicating well, and providing an evidence-based approach to help guide individualized treatment plans. She is deeply committed to utilizing her expertise in the field of endocrinology to optimize her patients’ health and well-being.

    Dr. Ariel is also on the teaching faculty in the Stanford University School of Medicine. She is the Founding Director of the Student Guidance Program.

    Appointments with with Dr. Ariel are available in the Hoover Pavilion on 211 Quarry Road.

  • Marina Basina

    Marina Basina

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Diabetes type I and type II, insulin pump therapy, glucose sensor technology, insulin resistance, PCOS, thyroid disorders

  • Julie Chen

    Julie Chen

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    Bio Julie Chen, MD, is a clinical assistant professor in endocrinology at Stanford University. Dr. Chen graduated from Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She then completed her internal medicine residency at the University of California, San Diego and endocrinology fellowship at Stanford University Medical Center. She is double board certified in internal medicine and endocrinology.

    Dr. Chen practices general endocrinology but her clinical interest include thyroid disease/thyroid cancer, pituitary disease, and disorders of the bone. She also has a special interest in medical education and has developed online teaching resources for the endocrine fellowship program.

  • Katrin Chua

    Katrin Chua

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab is interested in understanding molecular processes that underlie aging and age-associated pathologies in mammals. We focus on a family of genes, the SIRTs, which regulate stress resistance and lifespan in lower organisms such as yeast, worms, and flies. In mammals, we recently uncovered a number of ways in which SIRT factors may contribute to cellular and organismal aging by regulating resistance to various forms of stress. We have now begun to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which these SIRT factors function. In particular, we are interested in how SIRT factors regulate chromatin, the molecular structure in which the DNA of mammalian genomes is packaged, and how such functions may link genome maintenance to stress resistance and aging.

  • Lawrence Crapo

    Lawrence Crapo

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism) at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Investigation of the epidemiology of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at a public hospital. All cases of DKA at SCVMC occurring over the past 5 years have been identified. Of the 480 cases of DKA, about 1/3 are in Type II diabetics, and 2/3 in Type I diabetics. We are exploring the causes of DKA in the two groups.

  • Kaniksha Desai

    Kaniksha Desai

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    Bio Dr. Kaniksha Desai is a board-certified endocrinologist and clinical assistant professor of endocrinology at Stanford University. She completed her endocrinology fellowship at the Mayo Clinic, with an emphasis on the management of patients with thyroid cancer. Dr. Desai’s clinical practice focuses on the management of patients with thyroid diseases, including thyroid nodules and thyroid cancers, and the management of patients with pituitary disorders. She also maintains board certification in neck ultrasonography and internal medicine.

  • Chrysoula Dosiou

    Chrysoula Dosiou

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am highly interested in the interactions between the endocrine and immune systems in women. Current clinical research interests lie in the field of autoimmune thyroid disease, especially thyroid autoimmunity in pregnancy.

  • David Feldman

    David Feldman

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Studies of the role of the vitamin D receptor in the action of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the active vitamin D hormone. Current efforts are evaluating the vitamin D receptor in breast and prostate cancer, osteoporosis and rickets.

  • Neil Gesundheit

    Neil Gesundheit

    Senior Associate Dean for Medical Education and Professor (Teaching) of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our medical education research group is developing and validating the best educational practices to train competent, compassionate, and ethical physicians and physician-scientists. We are studying the use of standardized patients and other modalities to improve clinical skill training and reasoning. We are interested in applying the rigor of clinical investigation to education research.

    My areas of clinical interest in endocrinology include disorders of the pituitary, thyroid, and gonad.

  • Andrew R. Hoffman

    Andrew R. Hoffman

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanism of genomic imprinting of insulin like growth factor-2 and other genes.Long range chromatin interactions Role of histone modifications and DNA methylation in gene expression.

  • Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Medicine (Endocrinology) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Katznelson is an internationally known neuroendocrinologist and clinical researcher, with research expertise in the diagnosis and management of hypopituitarism, the effects of hormones on neurocognitive function, and the development of therapeutics for acromegaly and Cushing’s syndrome, and neuroendocrine tumors. Dr. Katznelson is the medical director of the multidisciplinary Stanford Pituitary Center, a program geared for patient management, clinical research and patient education

  • Seung K. Kim  M.D., Ph.D.

    Seung K. Kim M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the genetics of pancreatic islet cell differentiation using molecular, embryologic and genetic methods in several model systems, including mice, embryonic stem cells, and Drosophila. Our work suggests that critical factors required for islet development are also needed to maintain essential functions of the mature islet. Our knowledge of genetic and cellular pathways governing islet formation has allowed us to use stem cell lines to produce islet replacements in vitro.

  • Sun Kim

    Sun Kim

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in studying the pathophysiological processes that contribute to glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. My current research focuses on characterizing pancreatic beta-cell function in populations with significant insulin resistance and vulnerability to developing diabetes: individuals with schizophrenia, morbid obesity, and history of gestational diabetes.

  • Fredric Kraemer

    Fredric Kraemer

    Stanford University Professor in Endocrinology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research interests are in the general area of cellular lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The work is aimed primarily at understanding the mechanisms regulating cholesterol and triglyceride accumulation in cells. We utilize a variety of techniques from cell biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology.

  • Rayhan Lal

    Rayhan Lal

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    Bio I grew up in the east bay area and was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 12. I studied electrical engineering and computer science at U.C. Berkeley (Go Bears!) with the hope of applying my knowledge to diabetes technology. The significance of clinical practice became clear to me after my younger sisters also developed diabetes. I am devoting my life to advancing the care of diabetes in patients of all ages.

  • Jennifer Lee

    Jennifer Lee

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a clinical scientist (PhD epidemiology), endocrinologist, and CMO at VAPA Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center . My group does pattern and prediction mapping along the life-course of interventions/outcomes and how healthcare system can positively impact health longitudinally. We use novel molecular epi, 'big' data like EHRs with advanced new designs/methods/technologies. These interests cut across multiple complex chronic diseases, aging, & critical lifespan stages.

  • Robert Marcus

    Robert Marcus

    Professor (Clinical) of Medicine (Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have been retired since 2008 and no longer conduct research

  • Tracey McLaughlin

    Tracey McLaughlin

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. McLaughlin conducts a number of clinical research studies related to obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Current studies include: 1) the impact of macronutrient composition on weight loss and cardiocascular risk (diabetic and nondiabetic patients); 2) comparison of weight loss and cardiovascular risk reduction in diabetic patients treated with different classes of antihyperglycemic drugs; 3) the role of the adipocyte in modulating insulin resistance

  • Deborah Sellmeyer

    Deborah Sellmeyer

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    Bio Dr. Sellmeyer is an internationally recognized expert in Metabolic Bone Disease. She is a renowned clinician who joined the Stanford faculty in 2018 as a Professor of Medicine. She has been recognized for her clinical excellence with induction into the Miller Coulson Academy of Clinical Excellence while she was at Johns Hopkins. In addition to her clinical expertise, Dr. Sellmeyer maintains a research program that centers on the effect of nutrition and environmental factors on skeletal metabolism which she has investigated through both smaller CRC-based trials and large multi-center trials. Studies she has conducted have investigated the role of dietary sodium chloride, source of dietary protein (animal, vegetable, dairy, soy), role of dietary potassium and alkaline potassium salts, targeted thoracic exercises on kyphosis, whether structured exercise can prevent bone loss in premenopausal women treated for breast cancer, and studies validating nutritional assessment questionnaires. Her expertise as a clinical researcher has enabled development of a multi-disciplinary translational research team including basic scientists in the orthopedic department, junior faculty members with K grant funding, and basic scientists in the endocrine division to develop translational projects studying the effects of osteoporosis medications on basic elements of skeletal biology utilizing bone biopsies from treated individuals as well as clinical trials of novel therapies for rare bone disorders. Dr. Sellmeyer also is a esteemed educator, having received multiple teaching awards.

  • Aimee D. Shu

    Aimee D. Shu

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    Bio I am an endocrinologist with particular interests in reproductive and bone health.

    I enjoy treating patients with menstrual disorders, menopause, fractures, osteoporosis, parathyroid imbalance, and calcium imbalance.

    As a certified menopause practitioner (North American Menopause Society), I help women fine-tune their health at the mid-life transition. Some women transition through menopause with ease, while others experience challenging symptoms like hot flashes, slowed metabolism, and mood changes. This transition period provides a good opportunity to create a "game plan" for preserving future health. It also marks the beginning of natural bone loss, leaving one more susceptible to fragility fractures.

    I provide individualized treatment plans for bone health to men and women of all ages, including for those with specific challenges such as chronic steroid use. As a certified clinical densitometrist (International Society for Clinical Densitometry), I personally review all my patients' bone density scan images. Thus, please bring any non-Stanford bone density scan images to your appointment with me.

    Appointments with me are available on Stanford's main campus (300 Pastuer Drive) and at the Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center (450 Broadway, Redwood City).

  • Marilyn Tan

    Marilyn Tan

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Type 2 diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance

  • Joy Wu

    Joy Wu

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory focuses on the pathways that regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast and adipocyte lineages. We are also studying the role of osteoblasts in the hematopoietic and cancer niches in the bone marrow microenvironment.