School of Medicine


Showing 1-100 of 110 Results

  • John R. Adler, MD

    John R. Adler, MD

    The Dorothy and Thye King Chan Professor in Neurosurgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The development and implementation of computerized, image-guided surgical tools to be used during minimally invasive brain operations. The clinical outcome of new technologies, and in particular the application of radiosurgery, for the treatment of brain tumors. The creation of new radiosurgical techniques for a wide array of brain and spine disorders.

  • Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Gregory W. Albers, MD

    The Coyote Foundation Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group’'s research focus is the acute treatment and prevention of cerebrovascular disorders. Our primary interest is the use of advanced imaging techniques to expand the treatment window for ischemic stroke. We are also conducting clinical studies of both neuroprotective and thrombolytic strategies for the treatment of acute stroke and investigating new antithrombotic strategies for stroke prevention.

  • Geoff Appelboom, M.D. Ph.D.

    Geoff Appelboom, M.D. Ph.D.

    Clinical Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Bio Dr Appelboom is Clinical Instructor of Neurosurgery at Stanford. Dr Appelboom is focused on advancing minimally invasive surgical techniques for diseases of the brain and spine.

    Dr Appelboom is a surgeon scientist. He spent 3 years of integrated PhD research at Columbia University Medical Center to study genetic predictors of vascular fragility. Dr Appelboom has authored over 60 peer reviewed publications in international journals including Stroke, Translational Stroke Research, Current Atherosclerosis Reports, and Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. He has also completed a master in stereotactic neurosurgery at La Sorbonne University in Paris. Dr Appelboom’s research efforts include utilization of MR guided technologies such as stereotactic radiosurgery and focused ultrasound.

    Dr Appelboom is a Stanford faculty with an entrepreneurial spirit. He was selected to be a 2017 Faculty Fellow at the Byers Center for Biodesign. The program provides the most in-depth training experience in health technology innovation with a multidisciplinary experience that involve hands-on health technology projects with the help of Biodesign faculty and industry experts.

  • Mahendra T. Bhati, M.D.

    Mahendra T. Bhati, M.D.

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Bhati is a board certified neuropsychiatrist with expertise in psychiatric diagnosis, psychopharmacology, and neuromodulation. He completed postdoctoral research studying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) evoked potentials in schizophrenia and was a principle investigator for the DSM-5 academic field trials. His research experience included roles as an investigator in the first controlled clinical trials of deep brain stimulation and low field synchronized TMS for treatment of depression. His current interests include studying TMS-evoked potentials as biomarkers for neuropsychiatric disorders, augmented-reality TMS, closed-loop responsive neurostimulation for treatment of impulse and fear-related disorders, and magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound for treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder and depression.

  • Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Larry and Sharon Malcolmson Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Inner ear microendoscopy -- Developing techniques for minimally-invasive imaging of inner ear microanatomy and neural pysiology. Applications include improved cochlear implant development, inner ear regenerative techniques, inner ear surgery, and auditory physiology.

    Microsurgical robotics -- Developing scalable microsurgical instrumentation and robotic techniques for use in head and neck surgery.

    Surgical Simulation -- Immersive environment for temporal bone surgical simulation.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how to make recovery faster and better after stroke.

  • David Camarillo

    David Camarillo

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Camarillo Lab is currently instrumenting Stanford athletes with inertial sensors to investigate the mechanism of concussion. Additionally, the lab is researching cell mechanics for regenerative medicine. We are developing a quantitative, noninvasive and early measure of viability in order to allow clinicians to transfer the single most viable embryo. Other research area is in medical instrumentation as it pertains to robotic catheterization for curing cardiac arrhythmia.

  • Pak H. Chan

    Pak H. Chan

    The James R. Doty Professor in Neurosurgery and Neurosciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuronal death and regeneration after strokeand neural injury

  • Steven D. Chang, MD

    Steven D. Chang, MD

    Robert C. and Jeannette Powell Neurosciences Professor and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical research includes studies in the treatment of cerebrovascular disorders, such as aneurysms and AVMs, as well as the use of radiosurgery to treat tumors and vascular malformations of the brain and spine.

    Dr. Chang is C0-Director of the Cyberknife Radiosurgery Program.

    Dr. Chang is also the head of the The Stanford Neuromolecular Innovation Program with the goal of developing new technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by neurological conditions.

  • Navjot Chaudhary

    Navjot Chaudhary

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurosurgery

    Bio Navjot Chaudhary, MD, FRCSC, is a Clinical Associate Professor of Neurosurgery. She received her medical degree from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada. Dr. Chaudhary completed her neurosurgery residency at the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada and fellowships in Spine Neurosurgery and Cyberknife Radiosurgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She works primarily in CyberKnife Neurosurgery at the Stanford Cancer Center, predominantly treating patients with brain and spine tumors, brain and spine arteriovenous malformations, and trigeminal neuralgia.

    Her research interests include surgical outcomes. She has co-authored several papers relating to spine conditions, vascular malformations, and brain tumor management.

  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests What distinguishes us humans from other animals is our ability to undergo complex behavior. The synapses are the structural connection between neurons that mediates the communication between neurons, which underlies our various cognitive function. My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered during mental retardation.

  • Ivan Cheng, MD

    Ivan Cheng, MD

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Cheng's research interests lie in the biologic enhancement of spinal fusions, molecular techniques of intervertebral disc regeneration, and techniques of spinal instrumentation. For more information, please go to http://www.ivanchengmd.com.

  • E.J. Chichilnisky

    E.J. Chichilnisky

    John R. Adler Professor, Professor of Neurosurgery and of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Functional circuitry of the retina and design of retinal prostheses

  • Graham Creasey

    Graham Creasey

    Paralyzed Veterans of America Professor of Spinal Cord Injury Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neural prostheses to stimulate and record from the peripheral and central nervous system, thereby directly connecting nervous systems with electronic systems

    Neural prostheses for control of bladder, bowel and sexual function after spinal cord injury

  • Atman Desai, MD

    Atman Desai, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory aims to analyze and solve healthcare problems relating to neurosurgical care and spine care on a population level. Through the development of algorithms that can be applied to various large national and state-level healthcare datasets, our goal is to harness big data to:

    1. Understand how quality in neurosurgical care and spine care can be defined in both short and long-term measures

    2. Develop appropriate measures of quality neurosurgical and spine care

    3. Create benchmarks for care in neurosurgery and spine surgery

    4. Create multivariate bio-statistical models of pre-operative, peri-operative and post-operative events and long term patient outcomes

    5. Understand how existing paradigms in neurosurgical care and spine care can be potentially improved to improve patient outcomes

    In addition to our population level research, our laboratory has been a national pioneer in integrating prospective outcomes driven medical informative and database systems into the electronic health record. This allows us to identify pre- and post-operative treatment measures that influence patient outcomes, and in doing so improve patient safety and maximize the efficacy of current treatments for neurosurgical and spine patients.

  • Jun Ding

    Jun Ding

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neural circuits of movement control in health and movement disorders

  • Robert Dodd, MD, PhD

    Robert Dodd, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Dodd is involved in clinical trials using endovascular coils that have a fiber coating that help heal aneurysms of the neck and can prevent an aneurysm from reforming. He uses minimally invasive endoscopic techniques to treat brain tumors.

    Dodd's research interests are in cerebral blood vessel reactivity and stroke.

  • James R. Doty, MD, FACS, FICS, FAANS

    James R. Doty, MD, FACS, FICS, FAANS

    Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My interest for many years has focused on neuro-oncology (brain tumors) and utilizing both surgery and stereotactically focused radiation to treat solid tumors of the nervous system primarily utilizing the CyberKnife.

    In addition, I am an expert in complex and minimally invasive spine surgery.

    More recently, my interests revolve around understanding the neural, social and mental bases of compassion and altruism using a multi-disciplinary approach.

  • Paul Graham Fisher, MD

    Paul Graham Fisher, MD

    Bing Director of the Program in Human Biology, Beirne Family Professor of Pediatric Neuro-Oncology, Professor of Pediatrics and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at SUMC

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical neuro-oncology: My research explores the epidemiology, natural history, and disease patterns of brain tumors in childhood, as well as prospective clinical trials for treating these neoplasms. Research interests also include neurologic effects of cancer and its therapies, and childhood headaches.

  • Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    The Maslah Saul Professor in the Department of Neurology and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Fisher is interested in clincal, laboratory and translational aspects of epilepsy research. Prior work has included: electrical deep brain stimulation for epilepsy, studied in laboratory models and clinical trials; drug delivery to a seizure focus; mechanisms of absence epilepsy studied with in vitro slices of brain thalamus; hyperthermic seizures; diagnosis and treatment of non-epileptic seizures, the post-ictal state; driving and epilepsy; new antiepileptic drugs; surgery for epilepsy.

  • Paul George, MD, PhD

    Paul George, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States, drastically disrupting the lives of stroke survivors and their caretakers. Unfortunately, because of tight therapeutic time requirements, the majority of stroke patients are not eligible for the current medicines or interventions. The George Lab's research focuses on improving stroke diagnostics as well as engineering new methods to enhance stroke recovery. Our lab's primary focus is applying novel bioengineering techniques to understand the mechanisms of neural recovery (primarily in stroke) and discovering methods to improve patient recovery. We use rodent models of stroke combined with biomaterial techniques, stem cell transplants, and microfabrication to achieve these aims and evaluate our methods with behavior testing and various imaging techniques. Our ultimate goal is to translate these findings into clinical trials to help stroke patients.

  • Jamshid Ghajar, MD, PhD, FACS

    Jamshid Ghajar, MD, PhD, FACS

    Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Principal Investigator,
    “Concussion Definition Consortium – An Evidence Based Project”. Department of Defense. There are over 40 definitions of concussion but none are evidence based- i.e. come from well done studies. We will extract the most salient data from well run studies that are designed to give us a "snapshot" of what concussion is.


    Principal Investigator,
    “Multi-Dimensional Model for Brain Trauma”. The goal is to develop a dynamic model for concussion, validate it on a retrospective dataset, and design a second study to validate it on a prospective dataset. Department of Defense.


    Principal Investigator,
    “EYE-TRAC Advance”. Testing 10,000 subjects with normal and post concussive eye tracking. Military and civilian athletes are included. Department of Defense.

    Principal Investigator,
    B-TEC (Brain Trauma Evidence-based Consortium). Combines Stanford B-TEC clinical trials coordinating center with the Brain Trauma Foundation's B-TEC evidence-based center to promote and coordinate an evidence-based approach to the spectrum of brain trauma from concussion to coma.

  • Carl Gold, MD, MS

    Carl Gold, MD, MS

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Gold is a board-certified general neurologist who is fellowship-trained in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders in hospitalized patients. He cares for a broad range of patients, including individuals with seizures, central nervous system infections, autoimmune diseases, headaches, neuromuscular conditions, and neurological complications of cancer. Dr. Gold has a particular clinical interest in the inpatient diagnosis of uncommon or rare neurological disorders. He is actively involved in projects to improve the experience of hospitalized patients with neurological conditions at Stanford. His research interests include reducing the number of readmissions to the neurological intensive care unit, improving physician-to-physician communication, and promoting shared decision-making in neurology.

  • Gerald Grant, MD, FACS

    Gerald Grant, MD, FACS

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Grant directs a Blood-brain Barrier Translational Laboratory focusing on enhancing drug delivery to brain tumors in children.

  • Jin S. Hahn, MD

    Jin S. Hahn, MD

    Professor of Neurology, of Pediatrics and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Clinical informatics and electronic health records
    2. Neonatal and fetal neurology
    3. Prenatal diagnosis neurodevelopmental anomalies
    4. Personalized Health and Wellness Records

  • Casey H. Halpern, MD

    Casey H. Halpern, MD

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are currently investigating the effects of deep brain stimulation in obesity using mouse models of human behavior. Many obese individuals exhibit behavioral disinhibition, a clinical feature of many neurologic and psychiatric conditions. We are dissecting the mesocorticolimbic circuit with novel techniques including optogenetics.

  • Summer Han

    Summer Han

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery and of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My current research focuses on understanding the genetic and environmental etiology of complex disease and developing and evaluating efficient screening strategies based on etiological understanding. The areas of my research interests include statistical genetics, molecular epidemiology, cancer screening, health policy modeling, and risk prediction modeling. I have developed various statistical methods to analyze high-dimensional data to identify genetic and environmental risk factors and their interactions for complex disease.

  • Omid R. Hariri

    Omid R. Hariri

    Clinical Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Bio Omid R. Hariri, is a Clinical Instructor of Neurosurgery. He attended UCLA, where he obtained his BSc in Neurosciences and graduated with Summa Cum Laude. He pursued his research fellowship with Howard Hughes Medical Institution under the mentorship of Dr. Paul Micevych. He continued his graduate studies at UCLA, where he obtained his Masters in Neurobiology. He received his medical degree from Western University of Health Sciences.
    Omid R. Hariri completed his neurological surgery residency at Riverside University Health System in Riverside, CA. Under the direct mentorship of his Chairman, Javed Siddiqi, M.D., Ph.D., he became the first fellow to the Board of Directors of California Association of Neurological Surgeons (CANS). He is currently pursuing his fellowship training in Complex Spine Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Omid Hariri has authored multiple peer-reviewed publications in international journals. His research interests include Spinal Oncology and associated biomechanical instability.

  • Ciara Harraher, MD

    Ciara Harraher, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in medical education and I am an Associate in the Practice of Medicine and doctoring with CARE ( E4C) Program. I am also interested in surgical outcomes research and I am involved in clinical trials studying brain tumors and stroke. I have also presented internationally on issues related to improving diversity in Neurosurgery.

  • Odette Harris, MD, MPH

    Odette Harris, MD, MPH

    Professor of Neurosurgery at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Traumatic brain injury with a focus on epidemiology and outcomes.

  • Griffith Harsh, MD

    Griffith Harsh, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Microsurgical treatment of tumors of the brain, spinal cord, pituitary gland and skull base;
    Radiosurgery of tumors;
    Molecular biology of brain tumors.

  • Melanie Hayden Gephart

    Melanie Hayden Gephart

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio I am a brain tumor neurosurgeon, treating patients with malignant and benign tumors, including glioma, brain metastases, meningioma, vestibular schwannoma, and pituitary adenomas. Our lab seeks greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms driving tumorigenesis and disease progression in malignant brain tumors. We currently study the capacity of cellular and cell-free DNA to inform treatment choices in patients with brain tumors. We also use single cell and cell subtype-specific transcriptomics to identify and target infiltrating glioblastoma. We hope to identify potentially targetable genes crucial in tumorigenesis. Our laboratory is a unique and collaborative working environment, engaged in a dynamic research environment at Stanford. Our laboratory space lies at the heart of the Stanford campus between the core campus and the medical facilities, emblematic of the translational aspects of our work.

    www.gephartlab.com
    www.GBMseq.org

  • Jaimie Henderson, MD

    Jaimie Henderson, MD

    John and Jene Blume - Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests encompass several areas of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery, including frameless stereotactic approaches for therapy delivery to deep brain nuclei; deformable patient-specific atlases for targeting brain structures; cortical physiology and its relationship to normal and pathological movement; neural prostheses; and the development of novel neuromodulatory techniques for the treatment of movement disorders, pain, and other neurological diseases.

  • Karen G. Hirsch, MD

    Karen G. Hirsch, MD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Karen G. Hirsch cares for critically ill patients with neurologic disorders in the intensive care unit and for patients with cerebrovascular disease in the inpatient stroke unit. Dr. Hirsch's research focuses on novel imaging techniques such as functional brain imaging in patients with cardiac arrest and traumatic brain injury. She also studies methods of non-invasive measurement of cerebral blood flow, oxygenation, and cerebrovascular autoregulation and how these parameters might be targeted to improve outcome in patients with neurologic injury. In the outpatient clinic, she sees patients with head injury, stroke and other neurovascular diseases in addition to patients who have been discharged from the neurological intensive care unit.

  • David S. Hong, MD

    David S. Hong, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurosurgery

    Bio Dr. Hong specializes in the treatment of pediatric patients with neurosurgical conditions, with additional specialty training in the treatment of pediatric spinal disorders, including scoliosis. He completed his residency in his home state of Michigan at the Detroit Medical Center, and completed fellowship training at Rady Children's Hospital in San Diego, before becoming a part of Stanford Children's Health.

    His clinical interests include brain tumors, epilepsy surgery, idiopathic scoliosis, Chiari malformation, vascular conditions, concussion, and will treat all other conditions within the specialty.

  • Peter H. Hwang

    Peter H. Hwang

    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (Rhinology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Characterization of ion transport activity in sinonasal epithelium
    - Optimization of mucosal wound healing in a rabbit model of sinus surgery
    - Clinical outcomes in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery
    - Effect of intraoperative local anesthetic use on post operative pain in patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery

  • Robert K. Jackler, MD

    Robert K. Jackler, MD

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in Otorhinolaryngology and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Tobacco advertising - please see below for details

    Clinical: Development of innovative surgical methods, via the cranial base, to expose inaccessible intracranial disease. Surgical simulation and robotics. Evidence based outcomes analysis in acoustic neuroma and other tumors of the cerebellopontine angle.

    Medical history - especially the history of otology, neurosurgery, deafness, and quackery.

  • Richard  A. Jaffe

    Richard A. Jaffe

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical and laboratory research activities are currently focused on developing new and sensitive means for detecting the onset of cerebral ischemia using both electrophysiological and advanced optical techniques.

  • Julia Kaltschmidt

    Julia Kaltschmidt

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The lab’s primary research interest is to understand how specific neuronal circuits are established. We use mouse genetics, combinatorial immunochemical labeling and high-resolution laser scanning microscopy to identify, manipulate, and quantitatively analyze synaptic contacts within the complex neuronal milieu of the spinal cord and the enteric nervous system.

  • Michael J. Kaplan

    Michael J. Kaplan

    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1) New therapeutic approaches for head and neck cancer, including immune stimulation possibilities (IRX-2 protocol), integration of biological modifiers, and, eventually, genetic approaches.
    2) Head and neck cancer stem cells: identification, characterization, control--in conjunction with the Irv Weissman and Michael Clarke labs in the Stem Cell Institute
    3) Development of innovative surgical methods at the anterior cranial base

  • Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Medicine (Endocrinology) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Katznelson is an internationally known neuroendocrinologist and clinical researcher, with research expertise in the diagnosis and management of hypopituitarism, the effects of hormones on neurocognitive function, and the development of therapeutics for acromegaly and Cushing’s syndrome, and neuroendocrine tumors. Dr. Katznelson is the medical director of the multidisciplinary Stanford Pituitary Center, a program geared for patient management, clinical research and patient education

  • Michel Kliot

    Michel Kliot

    Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery

    Bio             I grew up in New York City where I attended the oldest school in the Country, Collegiate, from 2nd grade to high school.  I then went to college at Harvard, receiving both a BA and MA, and Medical School at Yale.  Along the way I did graduate work in Neurobiology at Stanford.  I then returned to New York City and did an internship and neurosurgical residency at the Neurological Institute.  I was then given a wonderful opportunity to do a one year traveling Peripheral Nerve Fellowship in which I spent time at the University of Toronto in Canada and time at Louisiana State University in New Orleans.  I then joined the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Washington in Seattle.  There between 1991 and 2011 I rose through the academic ranks eventually becoming a Professor and Director of the Peripheral Nerve Center, as well as Acting Head of the section of neurosurgery at the Puget Sound VA Health Care System.  I then moved to UCSF in 2012 where I headed up their peripheral nerve effort and established their Center for Evaluation and Surgical Management of Peripheral Nerve Disorders.  In the summer of 2014 I moved to join the Department of Neurosurgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine as Professor and Director of the Peripheral Nerve Center.  During the past year I was asked to serve as interim Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery when the Chair, a close friend and colleague, suddenly died.  At Northwestern I continue to pursue and develop my interests in the following areas:  pushing the frontiers of peripheral nerve surgery by pioneering new imaging and surgical techniques; teaching residents and medical students; collaborating with clinical and research colleagues; and continuing my ongoing interest in biotechnology by taking ideas from their inception into the clinical arena.  I am now in the process of transitioning to Santa Barbra where I hope to help develop a Peripheral Nerve Center that can treat patients with a wide range of complex peripheral nerve problems. I will also be working part-time in the Dept of Neurosurgery at Stanford.  I remain very interested in finding ways to use the internet as a platform to educate patients and improve their care.  I also am dedicated to improving the overall patient experience.

  • Maarten G. Lansberg, MD, PhD

    Maarten G. Lansberg, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research involves the design and conduct of clinical trials to discover new treatments for patients who have suffered a stroke. These trials span treatment of acute stroke, stroke recovery, and stroke prevention. My research in acute stroke is primarily focused on the use of advanced neuroimaging methods (CT and MRI) to select patients who are most likely to benefit from therapies aimed at restoring blood flow to the brain in patients who have suffered a stroke.

  • Jin Hyung Lee

    Jin Hyung Lee

    Associate Professor of Neurology, of Neurosurgery and of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In vivo visualization and control of neural circuits

  • Wonjae Lee

    Wonjae Lee

    Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One of the key characteristics of life is the dynamic cross-scale interactions across different levels of biological organization, such as molecules, genes, cells, tissues, organs and an organism, in their own multi-scaled environmental contexts. The dynamic property of these interactions results in variation in physiological traits across individuals, shaping individuality of an organism. The overall research direction of my laboratory is to establish in vitro experimental platforms in which we can investigate this cross-scale interaction efficiently to develop personalized therapeutic strategies. Because many aspects of cross-scale interactions are mediated by blood circulation and crosstalk between the vasculature and perivascular tissues, our current efforts are focused on engineering the functional vasculatures in pathophysiological conditions of various human tissues. We have successfully developed in vitro experimental models equipped with the capacity of real-time monitoring of individual cell behaviors, which enables effective identification of the vascular routes that induce desirable behaviors of endogenous or exogenously grafted cells. Our in vitro model allows precise and independent control of the experimental parameters in highly time- and cost- efficient ways and facilitates the development of therapeutic and preventive treatment strategies in consideration of the phenotype variations across the patient population.

  • Michael S. Leong, MD

    Michael S. Leong, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Intrathecal / Intraspinal Analgesics
    - Ziconotide (Prialt)
    - Resiniferatoxin
    - Industry-supported clinical trials

  • Gordon Li, MD

    Gordon Li, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1.) My laboratory studies the biology of brain tumors with the goal of developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of malignant brain tumors and translating that research into clinical trials.
    2.) My clinical interests include improving surgical techniques for brain tumor surgery, immunotherapy for the treatment of glioblastoma, and novel uses for stereotactic radiosurgery.

  • Frank M. Longo, MD, PhD

    Frank M. Longo, MD, PhD

    George E. and Lucy Becker Professor in Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical interests include Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease and the development of effective therapeutics for these disorders. Laboratory interests encompass the elucidation of signaling mechanisms relevant to neurodegenerative disorders and the development of novel small molecule approaches for the treatment of neurodegenerative and other neurological disorders.

  • Jaime Lopez, MD

    Jaime Lopez, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical interests are in the areas of Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring (IOM), clinical neurophysiology, electromyopgraphy and in the use of botulinum toxins in the treatment of neurologic disorders. Our IOM group’s research is in the development of new and innovative techniques for monitoring the nervous system during surgical and endovascular procedures and how these alter surgical management and patient outcomes. I am also active in formulating national IOM practice guidelines.

  • Kelly Mahaney

    Kelly Mahaney

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Mahaney is a Pediatric Neurosurgeon with clinical interest in Hydrocephalus, Craniovertebral Junction abnormalities, Spasticity, Spinal dysraphism and Myelomeningocele, Central Nervous System tumors, and Pediatric Epilepsy surgery. She completed residency training at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and subspecialty Pediatric Neurosurgery training at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and the Barrow Neurologic Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital. She is interested in advancing Neuro-endoscopic techniques in Pediatric Neurosurgical practice. Dr. Mahaney's research focuses on delineating the role of iron in the development of post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus.

  • Michael P. Marks, MD

    Michael P. Marks, MD

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Interventional neuroradiology; cerebral arteriovenous malformations; stroke treatment and imaging; cerebral aneurysms

  • Aaron D. Milstein

    Aaron D. Milstein

    Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Aaron Milstein studies how dynamic synapses, neuronal cellular diversity, network connectivity, and plasticity mediate learning and memory. He trained with Roger Nicoll, Jeff Magee, and Sandro Romani, employing electrophysiology, optogenetics, pharmacology, and computational modeling to investigate information processing in neuronal circuits. Currently Aaron uses modern parallel computing methods to simulate spatial memory encoding in the hippocampus and its disfunction in epilepsy.

  • Michelle Monje

    Michelle Monje

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, of Pediatrics, of Pathology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Monje Lab studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of postnatal neurodevelopment. This includes microenvironmental influences on neural precursor cell fate choice in normal neurodevelopment and in disease states.

  • Seema Nagpal, MD

    Seema Nagpal, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I'm a board certified neuro-oncologist who treats both primary brain tumors as well as metastatic disease to the brain and nervous system. My research concentrates on clinical trials for patients with late-stage central nervous system cancer. I have a special interest in leptomeningeal disease, a devastating complication of lung and breast cancers. I collaborate with Stanford scientists to detect this disease earlier, and with our breast and lung oncologists to improve outcomes for patients.

  • Jayakar V. Nayak, MD, PhD

    Jayakar V. Nayak, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (Rhinology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Upper Airway Stem Cell Biology, Fate, and Repair/Regeneration of the Airway Epithelium to treat Upper and Lower Airway Disorders

  • Paul Nuyujukian

    Paul Nuyujukian

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group explores neuroengineering and its application to both basic and clinical neuroscience. Our goal is to develop brain-machine interfaces as a platform technology for a variety of brain-related medical conditions including stroke and epilepsy.

  • Theo Palmer

    Theo Palmer

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Members of the Palmer Lab study the biology of neural stem cells in brain development and in the adult. Our primary goal is to understand how genes and environment synergize in influencing stem cell behavior during development and how mild genetic or environmental risk factors for disease may synergize in their detrimental effects on brain development or in the risk of neuronal loss in age-related degenerative disease.

  • Jon Park, MD, FRCSC

    Jon Park, MD, FRCSC

    Saunders Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Non-fusion dynamic spinal stabilization, artificial disc technologies, and regenerative spinal technologies.

  • Zara M. Patel

    Zara M. Patel

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery (Rhinology) and of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Zara M. Patel is an Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology and of Neurosurgery at Stanford. She was born and raised in St. Louis, completed her MD at the Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland, Oregon and completed her residency training in otolaryngology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, NY. After pursuing fellowship training in rhinology and endoscopic skull base surgery at Stanford University, she was recruited to join the Emory University faculty in Atlanta in 2011. After four years, the rhinology division recruited her back to the West coast to rejoin the department here at Stanford University.

    Dr. Patel is an expert in advanced endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery. She treats patients with a wide variety of rhinologic complaints, including nasal obstruction, chronic sinus infection or inflammation, sinus disease that has failed medical therapy, sinus disease that has failed prior surgical therapy, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, benign and and malignant sinus and skull base tumors, as well as olfactory disorders.

    She is immediate past-Chair of the Education Committee for the American Rhinologic Society and has developed a multitude of educational materials for both physicians and patients to help them better understand rhinologic disorders. She is passionate about educating patients to allow them to make the best decisions about their own care, leading to the best outcomes.

    Dr. Patel has published widely in topics such as avoiding complications in endoscopic sinus surgery, chronic rhinosinusitis in the immunosuppressed patient population, new devices and techniques for endoscopic skull base surgery, racial disparities in sinonasal cancer survival and olfactory dysfunction. She continues to perform research in these areas, and is beginning collaborative efforts with neuroscientists and engineers to develop technology that she hopes will eventually help cure patients with olfactory loss.

  • Randal R. Peoples, MD, MS, FAANS

    Randal R. Peoples, MD, MS, FAANS

    Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery

    Bio I grew up in the heart of the Silicon Valley, trained in Chicago, and have practiced general Neurosurgery in the Las Vegas area for more than twenty years. Currently I primarily treat non-complex cervical and lumbar spine problems, brain and spine tumors. I have special interests in initial concussion recognition and management, and injuries of performing athletes.

  • Giles W Plant

    Giles W Plant

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on the repair of the injured spinal cord. We investigate the following areas:
    - Spinal cord injury (SCI): Axonal regeneration, myelination and gene therapy
    - Stem cell transplantation (adult, embryonic and iPS)
    - Endogenous stem cell activity after SCI
    - Olfactory ensheathing glia and olfactory neurogenesis

  • Gerald Popelka, PhD

    Gerald Popelka, PhD

    Consulting Professor of Otolaryngology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My long term research effort is centered on understanding and accurately measuring normal and abnormal sensory function at the periphery and within the brain. I have long been involved with the auditory system. My goals include specifically understanding the basic mechanisms of hearing and hearing loss and developing effective and safe interventions that include surgical intervention, wearable devices, and therapeutic interventions.

  • Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

    Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include the development, validation and application of functional and structural Neuroimaging techniques to be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease.

  • John Ratliff, MD, FACS

    John Ratliff, MD, FACS

    Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus upon preventing complications in spine surgery, assessing patient outcomes after spine surgery procedures, and developing population-based metrics for assessing surgical outcomes.

  • Lawrence Recht, MD

    Lawrence Recht, MD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory focuses on two interrelated projects: (1) assessment of glioma development within the framework of the multistage model of carcinogenesis through utilization of the rodent model of ENU neurocarcinogenesis; and (2) assessment of stem cell specification and pluripotency using an embryonic stem cell model system in which neural differentiation is induced.

  • Nidhi Rohatgi, MD, MS, FACP

    Nidhi Rohatgi, MD, MS, FACP

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Quality improvement in Perioperative Medicine
    - Standardizing patient care for safer/effective management

  • Robert Sapolsky

    Robert Sapolsky

    John A. and Cynthia Fry Gunn Professor and Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuron death, stress, gene therapy

  • Gregory Scherrer

    Gregory Scherrer

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory investigates the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pain and its control by opioids. When chronic, pain is no longer an essential warning system critical to our survival, but a disease that severely affects the quality of life of many patients. We search to identity the neurons that participate in generating the sensation of pain and the molecular mechanisms that regulate neural activity in pain circuits to develop novel analgesic strategies against chronic pain.

  • Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical interests involve inpatient and outpatient care of patients with neurovascular diseases, mostly ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. I have a particular interest in cervical artery dissection, non-atherosclerotic vasculopathies, and stroke in the young.

  • Mehrdad Shamloo

    Mehrdad Shamloo

    Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The ultimate goal of the Shamloo laboratory is to rapidly advance our understanding of brain function at the molecular, cellular, circuit and behavioral levels, and to elucidate the pathological process underlying malfunction of the nervous system following injury and neurologic disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and autism. I aim to study the process leading to functional and behavioral malfunction in these disorders, focusing on a set of target genes/proteins.

  • Lawrence Shuer, MD

    Lawrence Shuer, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have clinical research interests in the surgical treatment of epilepsy. I am also interested in new developments in the treatment of craniosynostosis a congenital abnormality of infant's skulls

  • Gerald Silverberg

    Gerald Silverberg

    Professor of Neurosurgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Age-related changes in the blood-brain barrier (BBB)and on CSF dynsmics decrease the clearance of toxic metabolites, such as amyloid beta peptides (A-betas), from the brain. I am studing the effects of aging and hydrocephalus on the BBB receptors that transport A-betas and on the formation and bulk flow of CSF.

  • Harminder Singh, M.D.

    Harminder Singh, M.D.

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Minimally Invasive Cranial and Spinal Surgery, Endoscopic Keyhole Surgery

  • Stephen Skirboll

    Stephen Skirboll

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on screening strategies to identify and characterize cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human gliomas. We are pursuing this in several ways: 1) a novel colony-forming antibody live cell array to identify distinct CSC surface phenotypes, 2) RNAi screens to identify kinases critical for CSC tumorigenicity, 3) high throughput small molecule and chemical screens to identify compounds that selectively kill or target CSCs, and 4) identifying CSCs using the tumor specific EGFRvIII

  • Ivan Soltesz

    Ivan Soltesz

    James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences

    Bio Ivan Soltesz received his doctorate in Budapest and conducted postdoctoral research at universities at Oxford, London, Stanford and Dallas. He established his laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, in 1995. He became full Professor in 2003, and served as department Chair from 2006 to July 2015. He returned to Stanford in 2015 as the James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. His major research interest is focused on neuronal microcircuits, network oscillations, cannabinoid signaling and the mechanistic bases of circuit dysfunction in epilepsy.
    His laboratory employs a combination of closely integrated experimental and theoretical techniques, including closed-loop in vivo optogenetics, paired patch clamp recordings, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from identified interneurons in awake mice, 2-photon imaging, machine learning-aided 3D video analysis of behavior, video-EEG recordings, behavioral approaches, and large-scale computational modeling methods using supercomputers. He is the author of a book on GABAergic microcircuits (Diversity in the Neuronal Machine, Oxford University Press), and editor of a book on Computational Neuroscience in Epilepsy (Academic Press/Elsevier). He co-founded the first Gordon Research Conference on the Mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and epilepsy, and taught for five years in the Ion Channels Course at Cold Springs Harbor. He has over 30 years of research experience, with over 20 years as a faculty involved in the training of graduate students (total of 16, 6 of them MD/PhDs) and postdoctoral fellows (20), many of whom received fellowship awards, K99 grants, joined prestigious residency programs and became independent faculty.

  • Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Bernard and Ronni Lacroute-William Randolph Hearst Professor in Neurosurgery and Neurosciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory investigates the pathophysiology and treatment of cerebral ischemia, and methods to restore neurologic function after stroke. Treatment strategies include brain hypothermia, stem cell transplantation and optogenetic stimulation. Our clinical research develops innovative surgical, endovascular and radiosurgical approaches for treating difficult intracranial aneurysms, complex vascular malformations and occlusive disease, including Moyamoya disease, as well as stem cell transplant.

  • Peter A. Tass, MD, PhD

    Peter A. Tass, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    Bio Dr. Peter Tass investigates and develops neuromodulation techniques for understanding and treating neurologic conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, dysfunction following stroke and tinnitus. He creates invasive and non-invasive therapeutic procedures by means of comprehensive computational neuroscience studies and advanced data analysis techniques. The computational neuroscience studies guide experiments that use clinical electrophysiology measures, such as high density EEG recordings and MRI imaging, and various outcome measures. He has pioneered a neuromodulation approach based on thorough computational modelling that employs dynamic self-organization, plasticity and other neuromodulation principles to produce sustained effects after stimulation. To investigate stimulation effects and disease-related brain activity, he focuses on the development of stimulation methods that cause a sustained neural desynchronization by an unlearning of abnormal synaptic interactions. He also performs and contributes to pre-clinical and clinical research in related areas.

  • Suzanne Tharin

    Suzanne Tharin

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The long-term goal of my research is the repair of damaged corticospinal circuitry. Therapeutic regeneration strategies will be informed by an understanding both of corticospinal motor neuron (CSMN) development and of events occurring in CSMN in the setting of spinal cord injury. MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of “suites” of genes. The work in my lab seeks to identify microRNA controls over CSMN development and over the CSMN response to spinal cord injury.

  • Reena P. Thomas, MD PhD

    Reena P. Thomas, MD PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Reena Thomas received her medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC and her PhD from the City of Hope Graduate School in Duarte, California. She completed her training as a resident in Neurology as well as her fellowship training in Neuro-Oncology at Stanford University Hospital. Her research background and interests are focused on immune based cancer therapies and chemokine signaling in glioblastoma brain tumors. She has also been involved in advanced imaging studies of glioblastoma. She is the Director of the Adult Neuro Oncology Fellowship at Stanford.