School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 48 Results

  • Michael Bassik

    Michael Bassik

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory is focused on (1) the development of new technologies for high-throughput functional genomics using the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and (2) application of these tools to study the cellular response to drugs and endocytic pathogens (such as bacteria, viruses, and protein toxins). Fascinating in themselves, these pathogens also help illuminate basic cell biology. A complementary interest is in the identification of new drug targets and combinations to combat cancer and neurodegeneration.

  • Carolyn Bertozzi

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Radiology and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Bio Professor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

    Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, and the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, among many others. Her efforts in undergraduate education have earned the UC Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award and the Donald Sterling Noyce Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

    Today, the Bertozzi Group at Stanford studies the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammatory disorders such as arthritis, and infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. The work has advanced understanding of cell surface oligosaccharides involved in cell recognition and inter-cellular communication.

    Dr. Bertozzi's lab also develops new methods to perform controlled chemical reactions within living systems. The group has developed new tools for studying glycans in living systems, and more recently nanotechnologies for probing biological systems. Such "bioorthoganol" chemistries enable manipulation of biomolecules in their living environment.

    Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi founded Redwood Bioscience of Emeryville, California, and has served on the research advisory board of GlaxoSmithKline.

  • Matthew Bogyo

    Matthew Bogyo

    Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab uses chemical, biochemical, and cell biological methods to study protease function in human disease. Projects include:

    1) Design and synthesis of novel chemical probes for serine and cysteine hydrolases.

    2) Understanding the role of hydrolases in bacterial pathogenesis and the human parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii.

    3) Defining the specific functional roles of proteases during the process of tumorogenesis.

    4) In vivo imaging of protease activity

  • James K. Chen

    James K. Chen

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory combines synthetic chemistry and developmental biology to investigate the molecular events that regulate embryonic patterning, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. We are currently using genetic and small-molecule approaches to study the molecular mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling, and we are developing chemical technologies to perturb and observe the genetic programs that underlie vertebrate development.

  • Bill Chiu

    Bill Chiu

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Chiu obtained his B.S. degree in Biological Sciences and graduated with Honors from Stanford University. After graduating, he received his Medical Degree at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where he remained for his internship and General Surgery residency training. Dr. Chiu completed his Pediatric Surgery training at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He is an Associate Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine where he has an active research program studying innovative approaches to treat patients with neuroblastoma.

  • A. Dimitrios Colevas

    A. Dimitrios Colevas

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Multi- modality treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    Phase 1 clinical trials

  • Hongjie Dai

    Hongjie Dai

    The J.G. Jackson and C.J. Wood Professor in Chemistry

    Bio Professor Dai’s research spans chemistry, physics, and materials and biomedical sciences, leading to materials with properties useful in electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. Recent developments include near-infrared-II fluorescence imaging, ultra-sensitive diagnostic assays, a fast-charging aluminum battery and inexpensive electrocatalysts that split water into oxygen and hydrogen fuels.

    Born in 1966 in Shaoyang, China, Hongjie Dai began his formal studies in physics at Tsinghua U. in Beijing (B.S. 1989) and applied sciences at Columbia U. (M.S. 1991). His doctoral work under Dr. Charles Lieber at Harvard U. (Ph.D. 1994) focused on charge-density waves and superconductivity. During postdoctoral research at Rice U. with Dr. Richard Smalley, he developed carbon nanotube probes for atomic force microscopy. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1997, and in 2007 was named Jackson–Wood Professor of Chemistry. Among many awards, he has been recognized with the ACS Pure Chemistry Award, APS McGroddy Prize for New Materials, Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics and Materials Research Society Mid-Career Award. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, AAAS and National Academy of Sciences.

    The Dai Laboratory has advanced the synthesis and basic understanding of carbon nanomaterials and applications in nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, energy storage and electrocatalysis.

    Nanomaterials
    The Dai Lab pioneered some of the now-widespread uses of chemical vapor deposition for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth, including vertically aligned nanotubes and patterned growth of single-walled CNTs on wafer substrates, facilitating fundamental studies of their intrinsic properties. The group developed the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons, and of nanocrystals and nanoparticles on CNTs and graphene with controlled degrees of oxidation, producing a class of strongly coupled hybrid materials with advanced properties for electrochemistry, electrocatalysis and photocatalysis. The lab’s synthesis of a novel plasmonic gold film has enhanced near-infrared fluorescence up to 100-fold, enabling ultra-sensitive assays of disease biomarkers.

    Nanoscale Physics and Electronics
    High quality nanotubes from his group’s synthesis are widely used to investigate the electrical, mechanical, optical, electro-mechanical and thermal properties of quasi-one-dimensional systems. Lab members have studied ballistic electron transport in nanotubes and demonstrated nanotube-based nanosensors, Pd ohmic contacts and ballistic field effect transistors with integrated high-kappa dielectrics.

    Nanomedicine and NIR-II Imaging
    Advancing biological research with CNTs and nano-graphene, group members have developed π–π stacking non-covalent functionalization chemistry, molecular cellular delivery (drugs, proteins and siRNA), in vivo anti-cancer drug delivery and in vivo photothermal ablation of cancer. Using nanotubes as novel contrast agents, lab collaborations have developed in vitro and in vivo Raman, photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging. Lab members have exploited the physics of reduced light scattering in the near-infrared-II (1000-1700nm) window and pioneered NIR-II fluorescence imaging to increase tissue penetration depth in vivo. Video-rate NIR-II imaging can measure blood flow in single vessels in real time. The lab has developed novel NIR-II fluorescence agents, including CNTs, quantum dots, conjugated polymers and small organic dyes with promise for clinical translation.

    Electrocatalysis and Batteries
    The Dai group’s nanocarbon–inorganic particle hybrid materials have opened new directions in energy research. Advances include electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and water splitting catalysts including NiFe layered-double-hydroxide for oxygen evolution. Recently, the group also demonstrated an aluminum ion battery with graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes, a substantial breakthrough in battery science.

  • Frederick M. Dirbas

    Frederick M. Dirbas

    Associate Professor of Surgery (General Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests are focused on minimizing the impact of breast cancer from a diagnostic and therapuetic standpoint. Breast MRI is a powerful tool to facilitate the screening for and staging of breast cancer, and can be valuable adjunct to guide breast surgery. Oncoplastic surgical techniques optimize cosmesis after breast cancer surgery. Accelerated radiotherapy after lumpectomy decreases radiotherapy treatment times from 6 weeks to just 1 to 5 days.

  • Alice C. Fan

    Alice C. Fan

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Fan is a physician scientist who studies how turning off oncogenes (cancer genes) can cause tumor regression in preclinical and clinical translational studies. Based on her findings, she has initiated clinical trials studying how targeted therapies affect cancer signals in kidney cancer and low grade lymphoma. In the laboratory, she uses new nanotechnology strategies for tumor diagnosis and treatment to define biomarkers for personalized therapy.

  • Dean W. Felsher

    Dean W. Felsher

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory investigates how oncogenes initiate and sustain tumorigenesis. I have developed model systems whereby I can conditionally activate oncogenes in normal human and mouse cells in tissue culture or in specific tissues of transgenic mice. In particular using the tetracycline regulatory system, I have generated a conditional model system for MYC-induced tumors. I have shown that cancers caused by the conditional over-expression of the MYC proto-oncogene regress with its inactivation.