School of Medicine

Showing 1-10 of 21 Results

  • John  Boothroyd

    John Boothroyd

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are intereseted in the interaction between the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and its mammalian host. We use a combination of molecular and genetic tools to understand how this obligate intracellular parasite can invade almost any cell it encounters, how it co-opts a host cell once inside and how it evades the immune response to produce a life-long, persistent infection.

  • Jan Carette

    Jan Carette

    Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on the identification of host genes that play critical roles in the pathogenesis of infectious agents including viruses. We use haploid genetic screens in human cells as an efficient approach to perform loss-of-function studies. Besides obtaining fundamental insights on how viruses hijack cellular processes and on host defense mechanisms, it may also facilitate the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  • Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Professor of Microbiology & Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Contribution of T cells to immunocompetence and autoimmunity; how the immune system clears infection, avoids autoimmunity and how infection impacts on the development of immune responses.

  • Christopher H. Contag

    Christopher H. Contag

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology), of Microbiology and Immunology and, by courtesy, of Radiology and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We develop and use the tools of molecular imaging to understand oncogenesis, reveal patterns of cell migration in immunosurveillance, monitor gene expression, visualize stem cell biology, and assess the distribution of pathogens in living animal models of human biology and disease. Biology doesn't occur in "a vacuum" or on coated plates--it occurs in the living body and that's were we look for biological patterns and responses to insult.

  • Mark M. Davis

    Mark M. Davis

    The Burt and Marion Avery Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms of lymphocyte recognition and differentiation; Systems immunology and human immunology; vaccination and infection.

  • Stephen J. Galli, MD

    Stephen J. Galli, MD

    The Mary Hewitt Loveless, M.D. Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goals of Dr. Galli's laboratory are to understand the regulation of mast cell and basophil development and the expression of mast cell and basophil function, and to develop and use genetic approaches to elucidate the roles of these cells in health and disease.

  • Steven Higginbottom

    Steven Higginbottom

    Life Science Research Professional, Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Role at Stanford Maintain and operate Gnotobiotic research facility.

  • Juliana Idoyaga

    Juliana Idoyaga

    Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Idoyaga Lab is focused on the function and biology of dendritic cells, which are specialized antigen-presenting cells that initiate and modulate our body’s immune responses. Considering their importance in orchestrating the quality and quantity of immune responses, dendritic cells are an indisputable target for vaccines and therapies.

    Dendritic cells are not one cell type, but a network of cells comprised of many subsets or subpopulations with distinct developmental pathways and tissue localization. It is becoming apparent that each dendritic cell subset is different in its capacity to induce and modulate specific types of immune responses; however, there is still a lack of resolution and deep understanding of dendritic cell subset functional specialization. This gap in knowledge is an impediment for the rational design of immune interventions. Our research program focuses on advancing our understanding of mouse and human dendritic cell subsets, revealing their endowed capacity to induce distinct types of immune responses, and designing novel strategies to exploit them for vaccines and therapies.

  • Karla Kirkegaard

    Karla Kirkegaard

    Violetta L. Horton Research Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The biochemistry of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase function, the cell biology of the membrane rearrangements induced by positive-strand RNA virus infection of human cells, and the genetics of RNA viruses, which, with their high error rates, live at the brink of error catastrophe, are investigated in the Kirkegaard laboratory.

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