School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 16 Results

  • Daniel Bloch

    Daniel Bloch

    Professor (Research) of Health Research and Policy, Emeritus

    Bio I received my PhD. in Mathematical Statistics in 1967. I joined the research community at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Immunology & Rheumatology, in 1984 as head statistician directing the biostatistics consulting and analytic support of the Arthritis Rheumatism Aging Medical Information System (ARAMIS) and Multipurpose Arthritis Center (MAC) grant-related research programs. In 1993 I was appointed Associate Professor with a joint appointment in the Departments of Medicine and of Health Research & Policy, and am currently Professor of Biostatistics at Stanford University, emeritus since 2007. My contributions to the statistics literature span numerous fields, including methods of sample size estimation, efficiency and bias of estimators, research methods for kappa statistics, non-parametric classification methods and methods of assessing multi-parameter endpoints. I have over 200 peer-reviewed publications. I have been directly involved with the development of numerous criteria rules for classification of diseases and with establishing guidelines for clinical trial research and in proposing responder criteria for osteoarthritis drugs. Since 1987, I have been a consultant on an ad hoc basis to pharmaceutical and biotechnical firms, including both start-up and established companies. I have extensive experience with devices, drugs and biologics and have participated in all aspects of applying statistics to implement investigational plans; e.g.: for protocol development, design of trials, database design. I’ve been a member of the FDA Statistical Advisors Panel, the statistical member on numerous data safety monitoring boards, and frequently represent companies at meetings with the FDA

  • Eugene Butcher

    Eugene Butcher

    Klaus Bensch Professor in Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our interests include:
    1) The physiology and significance of lymphocyte homing in local and systemic immunity;
    2) biochemical and genetic studies of molecules that direct leukocyte recruitment;
    3) cellular and molecular genetic studies of leukocyte chemotaxis and the role of chemokines;
    4) vascular differentiation in normal and pathologic inflammatory states;
    5) systems and chemical biology approaches to understanding the regulation of lymphocyte trafficking programs.

  • Manish J. Butte, MD PhD

    Manish J. Butte, MD PhD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Immunology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory's goal is to address fundamental and therapeutic questions in immunology using innovative nanotechnological and biophysical approaches to visualize and manipulate cells. Our primary focus is on understanding the molecular controls that balance T cell activation versus tolerance. The ultimate aim of our work is to manipulate T cell signaling pathways to control immunologically-mediated diseases.

  • Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Yueh-hsiu Chien

    Professor of Microbiology & Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Contribution of T cells to immunocompetence and autoimmunity; how the immune system clears infection, avoids autoimmunity and how infection impacts on the development of immune responses.

  • Mark M. Davis

    Mark M. Davis

    The Burt and Marion Avery Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms of lymphocyte recognition and differentiation; Systems immunology and human immunology; vaccination and infection.

  • Edgar Engleman

    Edgar Engleman

    Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dendritic cells, NK cells and T cells; functional proteins and genes; immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer and autoimmune disease.

  • C. Garrison Fathman

    C. Garrison Fathman

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab of molecular and cellular immunology is interested in research in the general field of T cell activation and autoimmunity. We use lentiviral mediated transduction of murine dendritic cells with immunoregulatory proteins for site specific and targeted immunotherapy. We have identified and characterized a gene (GRAIL) that seems to control T cell anergy. We have recently characterized a gene (Deaf1) that seems to play a major role in peripheral tolerance in T1D.

  • Stephen Galli

    Stephen Galli

    The Mary Hewitt Loveless, M.D. Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goals of Dr. Galli's laboratory are to understand the regulation of mast cell and basophil development and the expression of mast cell and basophil function, and to develop and use genetic approaches to elucidate the roles of these cells in health and disease.

  • Chris Garcia

    Chris Garcia

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Structural and functional studies of transmembrane receptor interactions with their ligands in systems relevant to human health and disease - primarily in immunity, infection, and neurobiology. We study these problems using protein engineering, structural, biochemical, and combinatorial biology approaches.

  • Leonore A. Herzenberg

    Leonore A. Herzenberg

    Professor (Research) of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests B-cell development; Ig rearrangement and repertoire analysis; T cell regulation of antibody responses; T cell subsets; glutathione regulation of HIV disease progression; Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) related software development and gene arrays.

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