School of Medicine


Showing 151-173 of 173 Results

  • Lindsey Eileen Zimmerman

    Lindsey Eileen Zimmerman

    Affiliate, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Bio Lindsey Zimmerman, PhD, is a Clinical and Community Psychologist, and Implementation Scientist at the National Center for PTSD, Dissemination and Training Division of the Veterans Health Administration.

    Dr. Zimmerman is principal investigator of National Institutes of Health (NIH) research that enlists participatory system dynamics to increase timely patient access to evidence-based pharmacotherapy and evidence-based psychotherapy for depression, PTSD, alcohol and opioid use disorder.



    Current NIH Research Grants

    Participatory System Dynamics vs Audit and Feedback: A Cluster Randomized Trial of Mechanisms Of Implementation Change to Expand Reach of Evidence-Based Addiction and Mental Health Care (R01DA046651)

    The most common reasons Veterans seek VA addiction and mental health care is for help with opioid and alcohol misuse, depression and PTSD. Research evidence has established highly effective treatments that prevent relapse, overdose and suicide, but even with policy mandates, performance metrics, and electronic health records to fix the problem, these treatments may only reach 3-28% of patients. This study tests participatory business engineering methods that engage patients, providers and policy makers against the status quo approaches, such as data review, and will determine if it works, why it works, and whether it can be applied in many health care settings to guarantee patient access to the highest quality care and better meet the addiction and mental health needs of Veterans and the U.S. population.


    Participatory System Dynamics for Evidence-Based Addiction and Mental Healthcare (R21DA042198)

    Limited access and delays to high-quality, evidence-based mental health and addiction treatments can lead to patients getting too little or ineffective care and contribute to chronic patient impairment, relapse, and death by suicide or overdose. This study evaluates a system for resolving problems with patient flow and organization in health care systems, using electronic medical record systems and a high-level of input from healthcare leadership, frontline providers and patients. Using innovative approaches from engineering, stakeholders identify optimal ways to align existing resources to best meet patients’ needs, mathematically evaluating the impact of different organizational fixes before undertaking difficult systems changes; this helps health systems avoid ineffective improvement strategies and increases the supply of the most effective treatments to meet patients’ needs.



    National Responsibilities

    2019-present VA Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) 
    QUERI/Health Services Research & Development, Scientific Merit Review Committee

    2019-present Emory University
    Prolonged Exposure Consultant Training Program Advisory Board

    2018 National Institutes of Health
    Training Institute for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH)
    Mental Health Faculty Mentor

    2015-2017 National Institutes of Health Loan Repayment Program
    National Institute of Mental Health Clinical Research Review Committee



    Teaching Responsibilities

    Quality Improvement and Systems of Care Competencies
    Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences Residency, Stanford University School of Medicine & VA Palo Alto Health Care System

    Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program Seminar
    VA Palo Alto research centers of the National Center for PTSD (NCPTSD), Center for Innovation to Implementation (Ci2i), Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Care (MIRECC), and War-related Illness and Injury Study Center (WRIISC).



    Open Science Resources for the Modeling to Learn Simulation Learning Program are available on GitHub at https://mtl.how

  • Andrew Zolopa

    Andrew Zolopa

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Zolopa’s research applies a variety of clinical epidemiologic methods in an effort to optimize antiretroviral therapy and understand the impact of drug resistance on response to ARV. Areas of focus include the clinical application of resistance testing in optimizing antiretroviral therapy, clinical cohorts, trials of antiretroviral therapies and population-based epidemiologic evaluation of HIV resistance and efficacy of ARV therapy. More recently studies focused on premature aging in HIV.

  • Biyao Zou

    Biyao Zou

    Ph.D. Student in Epidemiology and Clinical Research, admitted Autumn 2018

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research has been focusing on the disease and economic burden and risk factors of liver disease in the United States and Asia. Currently, I work on identifying causal risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and the causal role of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in various diseases including cardiovascular disease and cancer using a genetic epidemiology approach.

  • J. Bradley Zuchero

    J. Bradley Zuchero

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Glia are a frontier of neuroscience, and overwhelming evidence from the last decade shows that they are essential regulators of all aspects of the nervous system. The Zuchero Lab aims to uncover how glial cells regulate neural development and how their dysfunction contributes to diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and in injuries like stroke.

    Although glia represent more than half of the cells in the human brain, fundamental questions remain to be answered. How do glia develop their highly specialized morphologies and interact with neurons to powerfully control form and function of the nervous system? How is this disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases and after injury? By bringing cutting-edge cell biology techniques to the study of glia, we aim to uncover how glia help sculpt and regulate the nervous system and test their potential as novel, untapped therapeutic targets for disease and injury.

    We are particularly interested in myelin, the insulating sheath around neuronal axons that is lost in diseases like MS. How do oligodendrocytes- the glial cell that produces myelin in the central nervous system- form and remodel myelin, and why do they fail to regenerate myelin in disease? Our current projects aim to use cell biology and neuroscience approaches to answer these fundamental questions. Ultimately we hope our work will lead to much-needed therapies to promote remyelination in patients.

  • Evan Zucker

    Evan Zucker

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology - Pediatric Radiology

    Bio Dr. Zucker is a board-certified pediatric and cardiovascular radiologist with a special interest in CT and MRI for congenital heart disease.

  • Donna Zulman

    Donna Zulman

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Improving care and supporting self-management for patients with multiple chronic conditions
    - Designing and evaluating innovative health care delivery models for complex and costly patients
    - Optimizing health-related technology to personalize and improve care for complex patients and their caregivers

  • Corinna Zygourakis

    Corinna Zygourakis

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My goal is to translate research into real-world action and decision-making so that my work can impact patients and the institutions in which they receive care. With a research focus on healthcare cost and quality of care, I approach neurosurgery in a unique way—one that applies business operations, economics, and healthcare delivery principles to our field. I have pursued formal LEAN business training, and believe in the importance of working together with other departments and administrators, as well as physicians and surgeons on the hospital and national level, to effect change. During my residency, I developed and led a multi-departmental prospective study at UCSF called OR SCORE (OR Surgical Cost Reduction Project) that brought together surgeons from the neurosurgery, orthopedics and ENT departments with nurses and administrators. OR SCORE successfully reduced surgical supply costs by nearly one million dollars in its first year by providing >60 surgeons with price transparency scorecards. This work led to a first-author publication in JAMA Surgery, but more importantly, set the foundation for further quality improvement and cost reduction efforts across the UCSF hospital system.

    A volunteer neurosurgical mission trip to Guadalajara, Mexico, where limited resources create an OR environment that is strikingly more frugal than the U.S., inspired me to lead another project aimed at quantifying and reducing operating room waste at UCSF. I have also conducted research looking at the safety and outcomes of overlapping surgery, as well as several projects to define the factors underlying variation in cost for neurosurgical care using UCSF’s hospital data and national databases like the National Inpatient Sample, Vizient (formerly known as University Health Consortium), and Medicare.

    As a clinical fellow at Johns Hopkins, I continued and expanded these research efforts. I designed and implemented an Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS) protocol at the Johns Hopkins Bayview hospital. This protocol standardized care for our spine patients, emphasizing pre-operative rehabilitation, psychiatric and nutritional assessments, and smoking cessation, as well as intra- and post-operative multi-modal pain therapy, early mobilization, and standardized antibiotic and bowel regimens. I also collaborated with engineers in the Johns Hopkins Carnegie Center for Surgical Innovation to develop better algorithms for intra-operative CT imaging, and provided assistance with operations to a basic science study looking at the role of cerebrospinal fluid drainage and duraplasty in a porcine model of spinal cord injury.

    At Stanford, I am building a research group focused on: (1) perfecting paradigms for delivery of high-end technology in spinal care, including robotics and navigation, (2) implementing cost and quality strategies in large healthcare systems, and (3) computational analysis of big-data to effect real-time risk stratification and decision making in spine surgery. I'm excited to collaborate with my peers across surgical and medical departments, as well as business and engineering colleagues.