School of Medicine


Showing 51-87 of 87 Results

  • Ivan Soltesz

    Ivan Soltesz

    James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences

    Bio Ivan Soltesz received his doctorate in Budapest and conducted postdoctoral research at universities at Oxford, London, Stanford and Dallas. He established his laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, in 1995. He became full Professor in 2003, and served as department Chair from 2006 to July 2015. He returned to Stanford in 2015 as the James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. His major research interest is focused on neuronal microcircuits, network oscillations, cannabinoid signaling and the mechanistic bases of circuit dysfunction in epilepsy.
    His laboratory employs a combination of closely integrated experimental and theoretical techniques, including closed-loop in vivo optogenetics, paired patch clamp recordings, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from identified interneurons in awake mice, 2-photon imaging, machine learning-aided 3D video analysis of behavior, video-EEG recordings, behavioral approaches, and large-scale computational modeling methods using supercomputers. He is the author of a book on GABAergic microcircuits (Diversity in the Neuronal Machine, Oxford University Press), and editor of a book on Computational Neuroscience in Epilepsy (Academic Press/Elsevier). He co-founded the first Gordon Research Conference on the Mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and epilepsy, and taught for five years in the Ion Channels Course at Cold Springs Harbor. He has over 30 years of research experience, with over 20 years as a faculty involved in the training of graduate students (total of 16, 6 of them MD/PhDs) and postdoctoral fellows (20), many of whom received fellowship awards, K99 grants, joined prestigious residency programs and became independent faculty.

  • Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
    Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling
    Modulation of BMP signaling
    BMP signaling in health and disease in the right ventricle of the heart
    "BMP signature" in blood as a biomarker
    BMP signaling in neonatal chronic lung disease

  • Daniel Spielman

    Daniel Spielman

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests are in the field of medical imaging, particularly magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. Current projects include MRI and MRS at high magnetic fields and metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled MRS.

  • Alfred M. Spormann

    Alfred M. Spormann

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Metabolism of anaerobic microbes in diseases, bioenergy, and bioremediation

  • James Spudich

    James Spudich

    Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The general research interest of this laboratory is the molecular basis of cell motility, with a current emphasis on power output by the human heart. We have three specific research interests, the molecular basis of energy transduction that leads to ATP-driven myosin movement on actin, the biochemical basis of the regulation of actin and myosin interaction and their assembly states, and the roles these proteins play in vivo, in cell movement, changes in cell shape and muscle contraction.

  • Sheri Spunt

    Sheri Spunt

    Endowed Professor of Pediatric Cancer

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses primarily on the management of children, adolescents, and young adults with soft tissue sarcomas. I also have an interest in developmental therapeutics and late effects of cancer therapy,

  • Randall Stafford

    Randall Stafford

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As Director of the SPRC Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, my work focuses on cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention, the adoption of new technology and practices, and patterns of physician practice, particularly medication prescribing. Specific interests include measuring and improving the quality of outpatient care, disparities in health care by race, gender, age and socioeconomic status, and interventions to improve prevention outcomes.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Marcia Stefanick, Ph.D a Professor of Medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, (SPRC) and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Dr. Stefanick's research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. Her work on the effects of menopausal hormones on cardiovascular and other health outcomes in mostly healthy postmenopausal women (in the Women's Health Initiative, WHI), in women with established heart disease, (the Heart and Estrogen-progesterone Replacement Study, HERS), and in peri-menopausal and early post-menopausal women (the Postmenopausal Estrogen and Progesterone Interventions, PEPI) trials has been widely disseminated both nationally and internationally. She was also the principal investigator of two large diet trials focusing on the role of a low-fat eating pattern (including increased vegetables & fruits) on preventing breast cancer (WHI) and recurrence (Women's Healthy Eating and Living, WHEL, trial) and she conducted several medium-sized diet, exercise, and weight control trials focused on heart disease risk and body composition that have influenced national guidelines. [She is currently writing a proposal for a large national trial of physical activity in older women with cardiovascular outcomes, not just risk factors.] Her current passion is the study of Sex (and Gender) Differences in Human Physiology and Disease, the title of a course she teaches in Stanford's Human Biology program, in addition to a course entitled: Current Topics and Controversies in Women's Health. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles in Stanford's Cardiovascular Institutes Women's Heart Health Program and Stanford Cancer Institutes Cancer Prevention and Control Program.
    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research directed her to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at SPRC, which has been her academic home for nearly 30 years.

  • Katherine Steffen

    Katherine Steffen

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus on using dissemination and implementation science tools to study and enhance care provided to patients in the pediatric ICU. I have a background in human factors research and in implementation science and am also interested in clinical effectiveness and outcomes in the PICU.

  • Lawrence Steinman, MD

    Lawrence Steinman, MD

    George A. Zimmermann Professor and Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory is dedicated to understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, particularly multiple sclerosis. We have developed several new therapies for autoimmunity, including some in Phase 2 clinical trials, as well as one approved drug, natalizumab. We have developed microarray technology for detecting autoantibodies to myelin proteins and lipids. We employ a diverse range of molecular and celluar approaches to trying to understand multiple sclerosis.

  • Lars Steinmetz

    Lars Steinmetz

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We apply diverse genomic approaches to understand how genetic variation affects health and disease by: 1) functional and mechanistic analyses of gene regulation, 2) studies of meiotic recombination and inheritance, 3) analyses of genetic and environmental interactions, and 4) characterization of diseases in human cells and model organisms. We integrate wet lab and computational genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic approaches, and develop technologies to enable personalized medicine.

  • David A. Stevens

    David A. Stevens

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Immunology and chemotherapy of human fungal diseases, particularly coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) in California and aspergillosis, and the parasitic disease, trypanosomiasis.

  • David Stevenson

    David Stevenson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on disorders of the RAS/MAPK pathway (eg. NF1, Noonan, CFC, and Costello syndrome). I am working on understanding the impact of RAS signaling on the musculoskeletal system. I use genomic approaches to identify somatic events and modifiers in the RASopathies. I am also involved in identifying outcome measures for use in clinical trials for the associated orthopedic manifestations. Other areas of research involve vascular anomalies, Prader-Willi syndrome, and hypophosphatasia.

  • David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    The Harold K. Faber Professor of Pediatrics, Senior Associate Dean, Maternal and Child Health and Professor, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is focused on the study of the ontogeny and control of heme catabolism and bilirubin production in the developing neonate. A better understanding of the role of increased bilirubin production in neonatal jaundice and the prevention of hemolytic jaundice has remained an overall objective of our program. We are also study the causes of preterm birth and ways to prevent it.

  • Aaron F. Straight

    Aaron F. Straight

    Professor of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the biology of chromosomes. Our research is focused on understanding how chromosomal domains are specialized for unique functions in chromosome segregation, cell division and cell differentiation. We are particularly interested in the genetic and epigenetic processes that govern vertebrate centromere function, in the organization of the genome in the eukaryotic nucleus and in the roles of RNAs in the regulation of chromosome structure.

  • Sarah Streett

    Sarah Streett

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio Dr. Sarah Streett is the Clinical Director of Inflammatory Bowel Disease at Stanford and is passionate about taking care of people with IBD. She is a national expert in the treating of complex IBD and is expanding our services to offer multi-disciplinary care and opportunities for clinical research participation. In 2018 she received the Champion of Hope Award from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation and serves on their Medical Advisory Board. Her interests are in fertility and pregnancy in people with IBD, developing precision approaches to IBD therapy, and in the role that the microbiome and diet play its pathogenesis. She is one of the investigators in the Stanford IBD Registry and has research projects focused on optimizing clinical outcomes in IBD, the role of the microbiota and diet in IBD and pregnancy and applying new technologies to individualizing therapy for IBD.

    Dr. Streett has a national leadership role in the American Gastroenterological Association, where has been Chair of the Practice Management and Economics Committee, as well as Chair of the AGA’s initiatives on Obesity. She currently serves on the Government Affairs Committee and is a special government employee at the FDA. She has represented the interests of gastroenterologists and their patients on Capitol Hill numerous times. Dr. Streett believes strongly in a collaborative approach to give patient’s personalized care based on the latest therapies for the treatment of IBD.

  • Matthew Strehlow

    Matthew Strehlow

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Strehlow's research is focused on global health and global emergency care. Working with in-country partners, he aims to identify the epidemiology of emergencies in developing countries and leverage the growth of emergency care systems in innovative ways to improve the overall health of the population. Specific examples include improving patient flow between the community and different level facilities and using emergency call center infrastructure to combat gender based violence.

  • Felice Su

    Felice Su

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical pharmacology research is focused on investigating the impact of dynamic organ function on drug disposition and designing dosing strategies based on mathematical models that account for these changes in order to optimize safe medication administration in critically ill children.

    Research through the REVIVE Initiative for Resuscitation Excellence investigates the quality of resuscitation during cardiopulmonary arrest. Areas of focus include early identification during the no-flow state prior to CPR initiation and quality of CPR simulation education.

  • Leslee L.Subak, MD

    Leslee L.Subak, MD

    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the association of weight and urinary incontinence (UI) in women and clinical trials to test strategies to improve outcomes in women’s genitourinary health. We have shown the independent association of weight and UI and the efficacy of weight loss to treat women with UI. I also conduct studies of epidemiology, economics and cost-effectiveness, and novel interventions for UI, sexual dysfunction, vaginal atrophy, pelvic organ prolapse and menopause symptoms.

  • Thomas Sudhof

    Thomas Sudhof

    Avram Goldstein Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Information transfer at synapses mediates information processing in brain, and is impaired in many brain diseases. Thomas Südhof is interested in how synapses are formed, how presynaptic terminals release neurotransmitters at synapses, and how synapses become dysfunctional in diseases such as autism or Alzheimer's disease. To address these questions, Südhof's laboratory employs approaches ranging from biophysical studies to the electrophysiological and behavioral analyses of mutant mice.

  • Pervez Sultan

    Pervez Sultan

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Pervez Sultan is an Associate Professor of Obstetric Anesthesiology, at Stanford University School of Medicine and also holds an Honorary Faculty position as Associate Professor at University College London. His research interests include defining, characterizing and measuring postpartum recovery.

    Pervez currently serves on the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology (SOAP) Research Committee.

    Researchgate profile: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Pervez_Sultan2
    Google Scholar profile: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Z2ftv_IAAAAJ&hl=en
    Twitter: @PervezSultanMD

  • Yang Sun, MD, PhD

    Yang Sun, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in the role of inositol phosphatases in eye development and disease, using both animal models and human disease tissue. We are a translational laboratory seeking to understand the basic function of proteins as well as developing therapeutic strategies for clinical trials.

  • Zijie Sun

    Zijie Sun

    Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We focus on understanding the molecular mechanism of transcription factors that govern the transformation of normal cells to a neoplastic state. We are especially interested in nuclear hormone action and its interactions with other signaling pathways in tumor development and progression.

  • Philip Sunshine

    Philip Sunshine

    Professor of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My primary interests are in the area of neonatal nutrition and developmental gastroenterology. The use of parenteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants, and the introduction of early enteral feeding to stimulate gastrointestinal maturation are my specific areas of investigative endeavors.

  • James Swartz

    James Swartz

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Bio Using and Understanding Cell-Free Biology

    Swartz Lab General Research Focus:

    The current and projected research in the Swartz lab balances basic research in microbial metabolism, protein expression, and protein folding with a strong emphasis on compelling applications. The power and versatility of cell-free methods coupled with careful evaluation and engineering of these new systems enables a whole new range of applications and scientific investigation. Fundamental research on: the mechanisms and kinetics of ribosomal function, fundamental bioenergetics, basic mechanisms of protein folding, functional genomics, and metabolic pathway analysis is motivated by a variety of near- and medium term applications spanning medicine, energy, and environmental needs.

    Swartz Lab Application Focus:

    In the medical area , current research addresses the need for patient-specific vaccines to treat cancer. Particularly for lymphomas, there is a strong need to be able to make a new cancer vaccine for each patient. Current technologies are not practical for this demanding task, but cell-free approaches are rapid and inexpensive. We have already demonstrated feasibility in mouse tumor challenge studies and are now expanding the range of applications and working to improve the relevant technologies. Experience with these vaccines has also suggested a new and exciting format for making inexpensive and very potent vaccines for general use.

    To address pressing needs for a new and cleaner energy source, we are working towards an organism that can efficiently capture solar energy and convert it into hydrogen. The first task is to develop an oxygen tolerant hydrogenase using cell-free technology to express libraries of mutated enzymes that can be rapidly screened for improved function. Even though these are very complex enzymes, we have produced active hydrogenases with our cell-free methods. We are now perfecting the screening methods for rapid and accurate identification of improved enzymes. After these new enzymes are identified, the project will progress toward metabolic engineering and bioreactor design research to achieve the scales and economies required.

    To address environmental needs, we are developing an improved water filters using an amazing membrane protein, Aquaporin Z. It has the ability to reject all other chemicals and ions except water. We have efficiently expressed the protein into lipid bilayer vesicles and are now working to cast these membranes on porous supports to complete the development of a new and powerful water purification technology. The same lessons will be applied toward the development of a new class of biosensors that brings high sensitivity and selectivity.

  • Karl Sylvester

    Karl Sylvester

    Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One of the current primary interests of the lab is to investigate the mechanisms by which hepatocellular injury and recovery is influenced and controlled by hepatocyte metabolism.

    A second focus of investigation is to identify molecular markers of human disease that provide diagnostic function, serve as targets for possible therapeutic manipulation, or provide insight into mechanisms of human disease. Specific diseases of interest include newborn sepsis and Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC).

  • Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Interventional Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Transarterial administration of chemotherapeutics, radioactive microspheres, and biologics for the treatment of unresectable tumors; management of portal hypertension and complications of cirrhosis (TIPS); treatment of complications of organ transplantation; Venous and pulmonary arterial thrombolysis and reconstruction; Stent and Stent-graft treatment of peripheral vascular diseases, aneurysms, aortic dissections

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