School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 33 Results

  • Robert W. Shafer

    Robert W. Shafer

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My group’s research is on the mechanisms and consequences of virus evolution with a focus on HIV therapy and drug resistance. We maintain a public HIV drug resistance database (http://hivdb.stanford.edu) as a resource for HIV drug resistance surveillance, interpreting HIV drug resistance tests, and HIV drug development. Our paramount goal is to inform HIV treatment and prevention policies by identifying the main factors responsible for the emergence and spread of drug resistance.

  • Jeanne Shen

    Jeanne Shen

    Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Gastrointestinal and pancreatobiliary pathology, with major emphasis on GI and pancreatic neoplasia, inflammatory bowel disease, and the application of artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies to digital pathology.

  • Kang Shen

    Kang Shen

    Professor of Biology and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The connectivity of a neuron (its unique constellation of synaptic inputs and outputs) is essential for its function. Neuronal connections are made with exquisite accuracy between specific types of neurons. How each neuron finds its synaptic partners has been a central question in developmental neurobiology. We utilize the relatively simple nervous system of nematode C. elegans, to search for molecules that can specify synaptic connections and understand the molecular mechanisms of synaptic as

  • Run Zhang Shi

    Run Zhang Shi

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical chemistry and therapeutic drug monitoring;
    adult and pediatric clinical endocrine testing;
    screening, detection and follow up of multiple myeloma;
    tumor markers;
    clinical utility of tandem mass spectrometry and high resolution mass spectrometry.

  • Hiroyuki Shimada

    Hiroyuki Shimada

    Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Hiroyuki Shimada, MD, PhD, FRCPA (Hon), is Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center. He was born in Tokyo, Japan, and completed MD (1973) and PhD (1982) at the Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan, and also completed his pathology training at the Children's Hospital (now the Nationwide Children’s Hospital) and the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA (1988). Before moving to the Stanford University in 2019, he was Professor of Pathology (Clinical Scholar) at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine and working at the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.
    Dr. Shimada was Chair of the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Committee (1999-2017) and the founder of the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Classification (INPC). As Director of the COG (Children’s Oncology Group) Neuroblastoma Pathology Reference Laboratory (since 2001), he has been actively reviewing pathology samples of ~700 neuroblastoma cases per year from United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Pathology review results according to the INPC have been providing critical information for patient stratification and protocol assignment in the COG international neuroblastoma clinical trials.

  • Richard Sibley

    Richard Sibley

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Immunologic mechanism of rejection in humans and animal, models of organ transplantation; histological definition of clinical pathology studies of various renal disorders.

  • Arend Sidow

    Arend Sidow

    Professor of Pathology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We have a highly collaborative research program in the evolutionary genomics of cancer. We apply well-established principles of phylogenetics to cancer evolution on the basis of whole genome sequencing and functional genomics data of multiple tumor samples from the same patient. Introductions to our work and the concepts we apply are best found in the Newburger et al paper in Genome Research and the Sidow and Spies review in TIGS.

    More information can be found here: http://www.sidowlab.org