School of Medicine


Showing 1-33 of 33 Results

  • Malaya Kumar Sahoo

    Malaya Kumar Sahoo

    Basic Life Res Scientist, Pathology Sponsored Projects

    Current Role at Stanford Basic Life Science Research Scientist
    Lab manager

  • Atif Saleem

    Atif Saleem

    Resident in Pathology

    Bio Dr. Atif Saleem is a fourth-year resident in anatomic and clinical pathology with interests in global health, dermatopathology, and hematopathology.

  • Darren Salmi

    Darren Salmi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Anatomy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Medical education, anatomy, autopsy, cardiovascular pathology

  • Ansuman Satpathy

    Ansuman Satpathy

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab works at the interface of immunology, cancer biology, and genomics to study cellular and molecular mechanisms of the immune response to cancer. In particular, we are leveraging high-throughput genomic technologies to understand the dynamics of the tumor-specific T cell response to cancer antigens and immunotherapies (checkpoint blockade, CAR-T cells, and others). We are also interested in understanding the impact of immuno-editing on the heterogeneity and clonal evolution of cancer.

    We previously developed genome sequencing technologies that enable epigenetic studies in primary human immune cells from patients: 1) 3D enhancer-promoter interaction profiling (Nat Genet, 2017), 2) paired epigenome and T cell receptor (TCR) profiling in single cells (Nat Med, 2018), 3) paired epigenome and CRISPR profiling in single cells (Cell, 2019), and high-throughput single-cell ATAC-seq in droplets (Nature Biotech, 2019). We used these tools to study fundamental principles of the T cell response to cancer immunotherapy (PD-1 blockade) directly in cancer patient samples (Nature Biotech, 2019; Nat Med, 2019).

  • Birgitt Schuele

    Birgitt Schuele

    Associate Professor (Research) of Pathology

    Bio Birgitt Schüle, MD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on medical genetics and stem cell modeling to unlock disease mechanisms and pathways leading to neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease and related disorders, and to develop new therapeutic strategies to advance precision medicine.
    She received her medical training from the Georg-August University Göttingen and Medical University Lübeck, Germany (1993 - 2001) and completed doctoral degree in medicine (Dr. med.) in neurophysiology at the Georg-August University Göttingen (2001). During her neurology internship from 2001 to 2002 at Medical University of Lübeck with Prof. Christine Klein, Dr. Schüle studied genes for inherited forms of Parkinson’s disease and dystonia. From 2003 to 2005, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in human genetics with Prof. Uta Francke at Stanford University School of Medicine. From 2005-2019, Dr. Schüle led key clinical research programs and biospecimen repositories for neurogenetics, translational stem cell and brain donation at the Parkinson’s Institute and Clinical Center.

  • Robert W. Shafer

    Robert W. Shafer

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My group’s research is on the mechanisms and consequences of virus evolution with a focus on HIV therapy and drug resistance. We maintain a public HIV drug resistance database (http://hivdb.stanford.edu) as a resource for HIV drug resistance surveillance, interpreting HIV drug resistance tests, and HIV drug development. Our paramount goal is to inform HIV treatment and prevention policies by identifying the main factors responsible for the emergence and spread of drug resistance.

  • Jeanne Shen

    Jeanne Shen

    Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Gastrointestinal and pancreatobiliary pathology, with major emphasis on GI and pancreatic neoplasia, inflammatory bowel disease, and the application of artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies to digital pathology.

  • Kang Shen

    Kang Shen

    Professor of Biology and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The connectivity of a neuron (its unique constellation of synaptic inputs and outputs) is essential for its function. Neuronal connections are made with exquisite accuracy between specific types of neurons. How each neuron finds its synaptic partners has been a central question in developmental neurobiology. We utilize the relatively simple nervous system of nematode C. elegans, to search for molecules that can specify synaptic connections and understand the molecular mechanisms of synaptic as

  • Run Zhang Shi

    Run Zhang Shi

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical chemistry and therapeutic drug monitoring;
    adult and pediatric clinical endocrine testing;
    screening, detection and follow up of multiple myeloma;
    tumor markers;
    clinical utility of tandem mass spectrometry and high resolution mass spectrometry.

  • Hiroyuki Shimada

    Hiroyuki Shimada

    Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Hiroyuki Shimada, MD, PhD, FRCPA (Hon), is Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center. He was born in Tokyo, Japan, and completed MD (1973) and PhD (1982) at the Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan, and also completed his pathology training at the Children's Hospital (now the Nationwide Children’s Hospital) and the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA (1988). Before moving to the Stanford University in 2019, he was Professor of Pathology (Clinical Scholar) at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine and working at the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.
    Dr. Shimada was Chair of the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Committee (1999-2017) and the founder of the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Classification (INPC). As Director of the COG (Children’s Oncology Group) Neuroblastoma Pathology Reference Laboratory (since 2001), he has been actively reviewing pathology samples of ~700 neuroblastoma cases per year from United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Pathology review results according to the INPC have been providing critical information for patient stratification and protocol assignment in the COG international neuroblastoma clinical trials.

  • Richard Sibley

    Richard Sibley

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Immunologic mechanism of rejection in humans and animal, models of organ transplantation; histological definition of clinical pathology studies of various renal disorders.

  • Arend Sidow

    Arend Sidow

    Professor of Pathology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We have a highly collaborative research program in the evolutionary genomics of cancer. We apply well-established principles of phylogenetics to cancer evolution on the basis of whole genome sequencing and functional genomics data of multiple tumor samples from the same patient. Introductions to our work and the concepts we apply are best found in the Newburger et al paper in Genome Research and the Sidow and Spies review in TIGS.

    More information can be found here: http://www.sidowlab.org

  • Oscar Silva MD PhD

    Oscar Silva MD PhD

    Resident in Pathology

    Bio Oscar Silva, MD, PhD is currently in his final year of training at Stanford University which has included anatomic and clinical pathology residency and hematopathology fellowship. Prior to Stanford, Dr. Silva received his MD and PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles – California Institute of Technology Medical Scientist Training Program (UCLA-Caltech MSTP). During his graduate training, Dr. Silva focused on T cell receptor signaling driving cytotoxic T cell immune responses. Dr. Silva’s current interests include the diagnosis of difficult hematolymphoid neoplasms and the identification and characterization of markers of diagnostic and prognostic importance in hematolymphoid neoplasia.

  • Raymond A. Sobel, M.D.

    Raymond A. Sobel, M.D.

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study cellular and molecular mechanisms of immune-mediated injury in CNS tissues that are affected in multiple sclerosis (MS). We study: 1) tissues of mice with EAE using histology and immunohistochemistry, 2) cross-recognition of neurons by antibodies against myelin proteolipid protein epitopes, and a distinct oligodendrogliopathy induced in mice by the non-protein amino acid azetidine (Aze), (which is found in the human diet); Aze-induced abnormalities mimic those in MS patient CNS tissues

  • Henning Stehr

    Henning Stehr

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Bioinformatics & Clinical Cancer Genomics

  • David Steiner

    David Steiner

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanistic and translational studies to better understand the functional and clinical implications of somatic mutations in aging and cancer.

  • Carlos Jose Suarez Valencia

    Carlos Jose Suarez Valencia

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    Bio Dr. Suarez is a board-certified pathologist specializing in anatomic, clinical and molecular genetic pathology. He received his M.D. degree with the highest honors (summa cum laude) from the University of the Valley (Universidad del Valle), Cali, Colombia. After medical school, he was a research fellow at a WHO-collaborating center investigating pattern of nosocomial antibiotic resistance, and later joined the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) as postdoctoral research fellow in cancer and lung immunology laboratories. He completed an anatomic and clinical pathology residency at the University of Washington, Seattle, and a Molecular Genetic Pathology fellowship at Stanford University. Dr. Suarez is currently Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology at Stanford University, and he is also Co-Director of the Genetic and Genomic Testing Optimization Service and Associate Director of the Molecular Pathology Laboratory at the Stanford University Medical Center.

  • Howard Sussman

    Howard Sussman

    Professor of Pathology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The general problem with which we are concerned is the elucidation of cellular mechanisms of gene regulation which are related to the neoplastic process in humans. The phenomenon of ectopic protein synthesis in human cancer offers a good experimental model for investigating this problem.

  • Katrin J Svensson

    Katrin J Svensson

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular metabolism