School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 58 Results

  • Chiara Sabatti

    Chiara Sabatti

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Statistical models and reasoning are key to our understanding of the genetic basis of human traits. Modern high-throughput technology presents us with new opportunities and challenges. We develop statistical approaches for high dimensional data in the attempt of improving our understanding of the molecular basis of health related traits.

  • Julien Sage

    Julien Sage

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the molecular pathways that regulate normal and aberrant blood cell development, including acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We are also studying novel drugs for treatment of cancer.

  • Julia Salzman

    Julia Salzman

    Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Circular RNA regulation and function; computational and experimental approaches

  • Peter Luke Santa Maria

    Peter Luke Santa Maria

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology-HNS (Otology and Neurotology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Tympanic membrane regeneration - novel treatment for healing chronic tympanic membrane perforations. Currently partnering with Astellas pharmaceuticals for a clinical trial.

    Novel treatments for biofilms in chronic suppurative otitis media using a unique rodent model created in our lab.

    Novel treatments for wound healing in intra oral wounds with potential applications to prevent post tonsillectomy wound healing.

    Medical device for maintaining perioperative normothermia

  • Kavita Sarin, MD, PhD

    Kavita Sarin, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Dermatology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research encompasses two main areas: 1) Using next-generation RNA, whole genome, and exome sequencing, we are investigating the genetic alterations involved in skin cancer progression, response to therapy, and other clinical outcomes and 2) We are developing and implementing genome-wide genetic risk prediction assessments for skin cancer into clinical use and studying the impact of this information on patient care.

  • Peter Sarnow

    Peter Sarnow

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory studies virus-host interactions with an emphasis microRNA-mediated gene regulation and on translational control. The mechanism by which a liver-specific microRNA regulates hepatitis C virus genome replication is under intense scrutiny. In addition, the mechanism of internal ribosome entry in certain cellular and viral mRNAs and its biological role in growth and development is being investigated.

  • Ansuman Satpathy

    Ansuman Satpathy

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab works at the interface of immunology, cancer biology, and genomics to study cellular and molecular mechanisms of the immune response to cancer. In particular, we are leveraging high-throughput genomic technologies to understand the dynamics of the tumor-specific T cell response to cancer antigens and immunotherapies (checkpoint blockade, CAR-T cells, and others). We are also interested in understanding the impact of immuno-editing on the heterogeneity and clonal evolution of cancer.

    We previously developed genome sequencing technologies that enable epigenetic studies in primary human immune cells from patients: 1) 3D enhancer-promoter interaction profiling (Nat Genet, 2017), 2) paired epigenome and T cell receptor (TCR) profiling in single cells (Nat Med, 2018), 3) paired epigenome and CRISPR profiling in single cells (Cell, 2019), and high-throughput single-cell ATAC-seq in droplets (Nature Biotech, 2019). We used these tools to study fundamental principles of the T cell response to cancer immunotherapy (PD-1 blockade) directly in cancer patient samples (Nature Biotech, 2019; Nat Med, 2019).

  • Gary Schoolnik

    Gary Schoolnik

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Structure-function analysis of bacterial adhesion proteins and toxins; design and synthesis of synthetic antigens; immunobiology of human papillomaviruses