School of Medicine


Showing 1-14 of 14 Results

  • Marlene Rabinovitch

    Marlene Rabinovitch

    Dwight and Vera Dunlevie Professor in Pediatric Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research program seeks to identify the cellular and molecular programs regulating vascular and lung development, through the use of cultured cells and tissues and mouse and rat models. We then determine how these programs are perturbed by genetic abnormalities or injurious processes associated with disease, focusing on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a fatal complication in children with heart defects, and a condition of unknown etiology primarily in young women.

  • Chandra Ramamoorthy

    Chandra Ramamoorthy

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Pediatric) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuro protection and neurologic outcomes in cardiac patients prior to and concurrent with cardiac surgery and catheterization

  • Thomas Rando, MD, PhD

    Thomas Rando, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms regulating stem cell function, the effects of aging on skeletal muscle and skeletal muscle stem cells, and the pathogenesis and experimental therapeutics for hereditary muscle diseases, specifically the muscular dystrophies.

  • Kristy Red-Horse

    Kristy Red-Horse

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiovascular developmental biology

  • Olaf Reinhartz

    Olaf Reinhartz

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Mechanical circulatory support in failing Fontan circulation
    2. Pathophysiologic response to fetal cardiac surgery.
    3. Various clinical projects in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery

  • Rhee,June-Wha

    Rhee,June-Wha

    Instructor, Cardiovascular Institute

    Bio Dr. Rhee is a general cardiologist with specialized clinical and research training in cardiovascular drug toxicity and pharmacogenomics. She completed clinical cardiology fellowship and internal medicine residency training at Stanford University School of Medicine. During her post-doctoral training, Dr. Rhee's research focused on elucidating cardiotoxic effects of iron overload and of multiple chemotherapeutic agents using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived models. Her current research employs clinical data, population genomics, and patient-derived iPSCs models to study genetic determinants and mechanisms of drug-induced cardiovascular toxicities. Dr. Rhee's clinic sees cardio-oncology patients and focuses on devising new methods for minimizing cardiovascular complications in that population.

  • Juan Rivas-Davila

    Juan Rivas-Davila

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Modern applications demand power capabilities beyond what is presently achievable. High performance systems need high power density and bandwidth that are difficult to achieve.
    Power density can be improved with better semiconductors and passive componets, and by reducing the energy storage requirements of the system. By dramatically increasing switching frequency it is possible to reduce size of power converters. I'm interested in high performance/frequency circuits switching >10 MHz.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Endowed Professor in Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Allan and Tina Neill Professor of Lymphatic Research and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical research includes studies on risk factor modification in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease; clinical trials involving medical therapies for peripheral arterial insufficiency; coronary angiogenesis; therapy of lymphedema; atherand photodynamic therapy in atherosclerosis.

  • Rajat Rohatgi

    Rajat Rohatgi

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests the overall goal of my laboratory is to uncover new regulatory mechanisms in signaling systems, to understand how these mechanisms are damaged in disease states, and to devise new strategies to repair their function.

  • Agustin Rojas-Munoz

    Agustin Rojas-Munoz

    Instructor, Cardiovascular Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Heart failure is a major cause of death worldwide. Up to 50% of these heart failure patients die from arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD). An intriguing aspect of SCD, however, is that affected individuals exhibit varied susceptibility to arrhythmogenic events, making risk stratification and prevention challenging. The overarching goal of Dr. Rojas-Muñoz's research is to uncover new molecular mediators of disease and use this information to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for SCD. Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cells-derived Cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) offers an unprecedented opportunity to model arrhythmia mechanisms and link them to disease susceptibility and disease progression. Therefore, Dr. Rojas-Muñoz's current approach leverages the use hiPSC-CMs to define the molecular components that mediate the alteration of cardiac currents upon cardiomyocyte stress and test for their ability to alter disease manifestation in patient specific models of long QT syndrome (LQTS) and in animal models of arrhythmia. Results from Dr. Rojas-Muñoz's research will provide a clearer picture of the circuit inducing and maintaining lethal arrhythmias, potentially leading to new strategies to lower morbidity and mortality of individuals at risk of SCD.

  • David Rosenthal

    David Rosenthal

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Cardiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests include the study of Heart Failure, Cardiomyopathy and ventricular dysfunction in children, from a clinical perspective. Investigations include clinical trials of medications, cardiac resynchronization, and mechanical circulatory support.

  • Elsie Gyang Ross

    Elsie Gyang Ross

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Vascular Surgery) and of Medicine (BMIR) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Ross is a vascular surgeon and research scientist. She graduated from Stanford University School of Medicine in 2011 and completed her vascular surgery 0+5 residency at Stanford University School of Medicine in 2018. During her residency, she completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in biomedical informatics. Her current research focuses on using machine learning and electronic health records for early disease identification, precision medicine, and evaluating opportunities to engage in patient education beyond the clinic.

  • Stephen J. Roth

    Stephen J. Roth

    Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Randomized Therapeutic Trials in Pediatric Heart Disease, NIH/U01 GrantNo. HL68285 2001-2006.
    Heparin and the Reduction of Thrombosis (HART) Study. Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.
    A Pilot Trial fo B-type Natriuretic Peptide for Promotion of Urine Output in Diuretic-Resistant Infants Following Cardiovascular Surgery.Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.