School of Medicine


Showing 1-8 of 8 Results

  • Rishi Raj

    Rishi Raj

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    Bio Dr. Rishi Raj is an Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and directs the Interstitial Lung Disease program at Stanford. He specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of interstitial lung diseases and has practiced pulmonary and critical care medicine for more than 15 years. Dr. Raj's primary clinical interest and primary focus of clinical research is interstitial lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, other idiopathic interstitial lung diseases, drug induced interstitial lung diseases, interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue diseases including scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis etc., sarcoidosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other miscellaneous interstitial lung diseases. Dr. Raj is the principal investigator and co-investigator on multiple clinical trials evaluating new therapies for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary fibrosis/interstitial lung disease from other etiologies.

  • Meghan Ramsey

    Meghan Ramsey

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    Bio Dr. Meghan Ramsey is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree from Lafayette College in Pennsylvania with a major in Neuroscience. She then attended Stanford University for medical school where she stayed to complete her internal medicine residency, and pulmonary/critical care fellowship. Her clinical time is split between the inpatient setting in the medical ICU and the ambulatory setting in Interventional Pulmonology with a focus on thoracic malignancies. Outside of her clinical time she has a dedicated commitment to teaching, serving as a mentor for residents and fellows, as well as leading as a co-director the pulmonary physiology course for medical students. Additionally, she has a focus on quality improvement serving as the Pulmonary division quality director.

  • Norman Rizk

    Norman Rizk

    Senior Associate Dean, Clinical Affairs in the School of Medicine and the Berthold and Belle N. Guggenhime Professor in Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in the prevention and control of critical care-related illnesses and complications, including ventilator-associated pneumonia, spread of nosocomial infections, and prognosis of multiple organ system failure in intensive care units. Infections and complications of therapy in immunocompromised hosts, including effects of chemotherapy and hematopoetic stem cell transplants is another interest.

  • Angela Rogers

    Angela Rogers

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use genetics and genomics methodologies to identify novel ARDS pathobiology; we hope that this will enable identification of novel biomarkers, phenotypes, and treatments for the disease. We are building a plasma biobank of critically ill patients at Stanford, with a particular focus on metabolic changes in critical illness.

  • Glenn Rosen

    Glenn Rosen

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory examines apoptotic and cell signaling pathways in cancer and lung disease. We are studying signaling pathways that regulate oxidative stress responses and cancer cell growth. Part of these studies focus on analysis of non-canonical transcription regulatory functions of the TERC and Tert components of telomerase in lung disease and cancer.

  • Stephen Ruoss

    Stephen Ruoss

    Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We have an active collaborative project examining basic and clinical aspects of non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung infection in non-immune compromised adults. Studies have examined possible cellular immune mechanisms for increased susceptibility to these infections, and are also investigating aspects of optimal diagnosis and treatment. In addition, a clinical and translational research program is investigating the causes and genetic factors underlying the evolution of bronchiectasis.

Latest information on COVID-19