School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 37 Results

  • Sonia Partap

    Sonia Partap

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests involve the epidemiology, treatment and diagnosis of pediatric and young adult brain tumors. I am also interested in long-term neurologic effects and designing clinical trials to treat brain and spinal cord tumors.

  • Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD

    Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr Parvizi completed his medical internship at Mayo Clinic and Neurology Residency at BIDMC Harvard Medical School before joining the UCLA for fellowship training in clinical neurophysiology and epilepsy. He has worked at Stanford University Medical Center since 2007 and specializes in treating patients with uncontrollable seizures. Dr. Parvizi is the principal investigator in the Laboratory of Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience whose research activities have been supported by National Institute of Health, National Science Foundation, and private foundations. To find out more about Dr Parvizi's scholarly activities please visit http://med.stanford.edu/parvizi-lab.html.

  • Anca M. Pasca, MD

    Anca M. Pasca, MD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The research focus of the lab is to understand molecular mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental disorders associated with premature birth, neonatal and fetal brain injury with the long-term goal of translating the lab’s findings into therapeutics. The research team employs a multidisciplinary approach involving genetics, molecular and developmental neurobiology, animal models and neural cells differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. In particular, the lab is using a powerful 3D human brain-region specific organoid system developed at Stanford (Nature Methods, 2015; Nature Protocols, 2018) to ask questions about brain injury during development.

    https://www.neopascalab.org/

  • Sergiu P. Pasca

    Sergiu P. Pasca

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests A critical challenge in understanding the intricate programs underlying development, assembly and dysfunction of the human brain is the lack of direct access to intact, functioning human brain tissue for detailed investigation by imaging, recording, and stimulation.
    To address this, we are developing bottom-up approaches to generate and assemble, from multi-cellular components, human neural circuits in vitro and in vivo.
    We introduced the use of instructive signals for deriving from human pluripotent stem cells self-organizing 3D cellular structures named brain region-specific spheroids/organoids. We demonstrated that these cultures, such as the ones resembling the cerebral cortex, can be reliably derived across many lines and experiments, contain synaptically connected neurons and non-reactive astrocytes, and can be used to gain mechanistic insights into genetic and environmental brain disorders. Moreover, when maintained as long-term cultures, they recapitulate an intrinsic program of maturation that progresses towards postnatal stages.
    We also pioneered a modular system to integrate 3D brain region-specific organoids and study human neuronal migration and neural circuit formation in functional preparations that we named assembloids. We have actively applied these models in combination with studies in long-term ex vivo brain preparations to acquire a deeper understanding of human physiology, evolution and disease mechanisms.
    We have carved a unique research program that combines rigorous in vivo and in vitro neuroscience, stem cell and molecular biology approaches to construct and deconstruct previously inaccessible stages of human brain development and function in health and disease.
    We believe science is a community effort, and accordingly, we have been advancing the field by broadly and openly sharing our technologies with numerous laboratories around the world and organizing the primary research conference and the training courses in the area of cellular models of the human brain.

  • Anisha I Patel

    Anisha I Patel

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Patel's research interests focus on reducing socioeconomic disparities in chronic diseases, including childhood obesity. Over the past 10 years, Dr. Patel has led numerous studies to encourage healthy beverage intake among children and adolescents. These studies include analyses of large national data sets, conduct of randomized controlled trials in schools, child care, and community settings to examine how interventions to increase children’s intake of water instead of sugar-sweetened beverages impact child health, and the evaluation of policy efforts to improve the healthfulness of beverages offered in schools and community settings.

    Dr. Patel has a diverse funding portfolio ranging from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Healthy Eating Research Program, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Patel has presented her research to local, national and international audiences. She has also been recognized for her research with awards from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill School of Public Health.

  • Gary Peltz

    Gary Peltz

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The laboratory develops and uses state of the art genomic methods to identify genetic factors affecting disease susceptibility, and to translate these findings into new treatments. We have developed a more efficient method for performing mouse genetic analysis, which has been used to analyze the genetic basis for 16 different biomedical traits. We are developing novel methods, and have developed a novel experimental platform that replaces mouse liver with functioning human liver tissue.

  • Jon-Paul Pepper, MD

    Jon-Paul Pepper, MD

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Facial paralysis is a debilitating condition that affects thousands of people. Despite excellent surgical technique, we are currently limited by the regenerative capacity of the body. The mission of our research is to identify new treatments that improve current facial paralysis treatments. We do this by exploring the regenerative cues that the body uses to restore tissue after nerve injury, in particular through pathways of neurogenesis and nerve repair in small mammals.

  • Dmitri Petrov

    Dmitri Petrov

    Michelle and Kevin Douglas Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Evolution of genomes and population genomics of adaptation and variation

  • Martin Pfaller

    Martin Pfaller

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Cardiology

    Bio I am a postdoc in the group of Alison Marsden, where I focus on cardio­vascular blood flow simulations. As a visiting student researcher with Ellen Kuhl at Stanford, I became fascinated with the application of computer simulations to medical problems. I graduated from the Technical University of Munich with a Ph.D., where I co-founded a group dedicated to the prediction of cardiovascular diseases using simulation methods. Since then, my research mission has been to make simulations more accurate and more accessible for clinicians. During my doctoral studies, we enhanced mechanical models by studying the interaction between the myocardium and the pericardium. We demonstrated how model order reduction could be used to speed up model personalization from patient data, such as cine MRI or blood pressure measurements. We also showed how simulations could enable patient-specific therapy planning of radiofrequency catheter ablation in atrial fibrillation. I am currently working on an NIH-funded project to improve reproducibility in blood flow simulations with data curation methods. We are developing a public repository of patient-specific simulations where other scientists can submit their simulations and automatically regain feedback. My long-term vision is to develop combined physics-based and data-based approaches to enable personalized therapies for the cardiovascular system.

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