School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 13 Results

  • David T. Paik

    David T. Paik

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Cardiovascular Institute

    Bio Dr. David Paik is a postdoctoral fellow working with Dr. Joseph Wu at Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. At Stanford, his focus is to utilize single-cell RNA-sequencing technology to elucidate patient-specific mechanisms of various cardiovascular diseases, characterize embryonic heart development, and optimize differentiation of iPSCs to subtypes of cardiovascular cells. Dr. Paik received his BA in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Boston University (2010) and PhD in Cell and Developmental Biology at Vanderbilt University (2015). At Vanderbilt, Dr. Paik was trained by Dr. Antonis Hatzopoulos to investigate the endogenous cardiac repair mechanisms in the adult heart following ischemic injury such as myocardial infarction. In particular, Dr. Paik focused on the role of Wnt signaling pathway on coronary vessel formation and plasticity of cardiac endothelial cells during cardiac tissue repair. During his PhD training, Dr. Paik completed HHMI/VUMC Certificate Program in Molecular Medicine, where he was supervised by his clinical mentor Dr. Douglas Sawyer to interact with congestive heart failure patients and to bridge clinical sciences with basic and translational cardiovascular research.

  • Alan C. Pao

    Alan C. Pao

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and, by courtesy, of Urology at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in how the kidneys control salt, water, and electrolyte homeostasis in the body. We use cultured kidney cells, transgenic mice, and human samples to study hormonal and signal transduction pathways that control epithelial ion transport. Clinical implications of our work include a better understanding of the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension and kidney stone formation and growth.

  • John M. Pauly

    John M. Pauly

    Reid Weaver Dennis Professor

    Bio Interests include medical imaging generally, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular. Current efforts are focused on medical applications of MRI where real-time interactive imaging is important. Two examples are cardiac imaging, and the interactive guidance of interventional procedures. Specific interests include rapid methods for the excitation and acquisition of the MR signal, and the reconstruction of images from the data acquired using these approaches.

  • Ronald Pearl

    Ronald Pearl

    Dr. Richard K. and Erika N. Richards Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanims (molecular and cellular) of pulmonary hypertension, treatment of pulmonary hypertension, treatment of respiratory failure, treatment of septic shock, hemodynamic monitoring

  • Norbert Pelc

    Norbert Pelc

    Boston Scientific Applied Biomedical Engineering Professor and Professor of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Broadly, Dr. Pelc is interested in the physics, engineering and mathematics of medical imaging, especially computed tomography, digital x-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and hybrid multimodality systems. His current research is concentrated in the development of computed tomography systems with higher image quality and dose efficiency, in the characterization of system performance, and in the development and validation of new clinical applications.

  • Marco Perez

    Marco Perez

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Marco Perez's research goal is to better understand the fundamental causes of cardiovascular disease through the study of genetics and epidemiology. His group studies the genetic variations and environmental exposures that are associated with conditions such as atrial fibrillation and heart failure. He has led the studies of atrial fibrillation in Women's Health Initiative, one of the largest nation-wide population-based cohorts. He is currently conducting a large study monitoring for silent or asymptomatic atrial fibrillation in women from the WHI randomized to exercise intervention, and is co-PI in the Apple Heart Study, a clinical trial using the Apple Watch to screen for atrial fibrillation. He is interested in understanding the paradox that atrial fibrillation is less common in African Americans and Hispanics, despite a greater burden of risk factors such as hypertension. As director of the Stanford Inherited Arrhythmia Clinic, he evaluates families with rare inherited arrhythmias associated with sudden death such as Long QT and Brugada Syndromes and explores their links with novel genes. He is particularly interested in studying the genetic causes of very early onset atrial fibrillation. He also studies how best to use the electrocardiogram to identify patients at risk for atrial fibrillation and athletes at risk for life-threatening arrhythmias due to conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. His genetic studies have led to the discovery of promising novel therapeutic targets that his group is now studying at a functional level. Dr. Perez receives funding from NIH/NHLBI (R01), Apple Inc., the Weston Havens Foundation, The Stanford Cardiovascular Division and the Stanford SPARK program.

  • Ada Poon

    Ada Poon

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on providing theoretical foundations and engineering platforms for realizing electronics that seamlessly integrate with the body. Such systems will allow precise recording or modulation of physiological activity, for advancing basic scientific discovery and for restoring or augmenting biological functions for clinical applications.

  • Matthew Porteus

    Matthew Porteus

    Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genome Editing and Population Dynamics for Gene Therapy and Cancer Research