School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 26 Results

  • Craig Levin

    Craig Levin

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford/Nuclear Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Physics, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular Imaging Instrumentation
    Laboratory

    Our research interests involve the development of novel instrumentation and software algorithms for in vivo imaging of cellular and molecular signatures of disease in humans and small laboratory animal subjects.

  • Jin Billy Li

    Jin Billy Li

    Associate Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Li Lab is primarily interested in RNA editing mediated by ADAR enzymes. We co-discovered that the major function of RNA editing is to label endogenous dsRNAs as "self" to avoid being recognized as "non-self" by MDA5, a host innate immune dsRNA sensor, leading us to pursue therapeutic applications in cancer, autoimmune diseases, and viral infection. The other major direction of the lab is to develop technologies to harness endogenous ADAR enzymes for site-specific transcriptome engineering.

  • David Liang, MD, PhD

    David Liang, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Bio Stanford researchers are creating a micro-device that physicians could guide through the body to help diagnose and treat clogged arteries and other diseases. Tethered to the outside world by a thin wire, a tiny machine creeps through blood vessels, searching out deadly plaques and obliterating them with a zap of a laser. While a laser will come later, for now David Liang, MD, PhD, is focusing on a tiny eye that could give physicians an unprecedented view into blood vessels.

  • Ronglih Liao

    Ronglih Liao

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Bio Dr. Liao is a Professor of Medicine and co-Director of Stanford Cardiac Amyloid Center. The major goal of her research program focuses on understanding the mechanisms that underlie the pathophysiology of heart failure and developing novel treatments to combat this process. Her laboratory has played an international leading role in the study of amyloid light chain (AL) cardiomyopathy, a rare and fatal form of cardiovascular disease. We have described the underlying pathophysiologic basis for amyloid cardiomyopathy and found that the circulating amyloidogenic light chain proteins that characterize this disease directly result in a specific cardiotoxic response. Consequently, our research work has redefined AL cardiomyopathy and has raised new treatment approaches. More recently, her research efforts have expanded to include transthyretin (ATTR) cardiac amyloidosis.

    In line with her goal of revealing novel therapeutic strategies for patients with cardiovascular disease, our efforts have also focused on characterizing and harnessing endogenous cardiac regenerative mechanisms. Her laboratory initially demonstrated the therapeutic potential of exogenous primitive muscle cells delivered to the injured heart. This work was among the earliest milestones in the field and served as the basis for an international trial of cell-based therapy. Subsequently, Liao lab identified and characterized a population of cardiac progenitor cells and its relationship and dynamic activity following cardiac injury in the adult heart. Her laboratory aims to reveal the molecular mechanisms regulating the endogenous regenerative capacity of the heart and to harness such repair mechanisms for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Dr. Liao has lectured extensively on both amyloid cardiomyopathy and stem cell biology, and have maintained a history of independent NIH funding in these areas for more than two decades.

    Over the course of her academic career, she has taken the greatest pride in mentoring the next generation of scientists. Dr. Liao has had the privilege to supervise several dozen students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty, many of whom have gone on to independent academic careers at the highest institutions. Her contribution to the advancement of scientific knowledge also includes lecturing at various university and academic institutions as well as at scores of conferences and symposia locally, nationally, and internationally.

  • Michaela Liedtke

    Michaela Liedtke

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Hematology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1) Design of phase I/II trials for the treatment of Multiple Myeloma and Amyloidosis

    2) Conduct of clinical trials to improve the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    3) Outcomes research using clinical databases for patients with Multiple Myeloma and Amyloidosis

    4) Characterization of the molecular mechanism of MLL-induced acute leukemia

  • Juliana Liu, MSN, RN, ANP-C

    Juliana Liu, MSN, RN, ANP-C

    Affiliate, CVI/Vera Moulton Wall Center

    Bio Juliana Liu, MSN, RN, ANP-C is the Program Manager and Nurse Practitioner for the Adult Pulmonary Hypertension Service at Stanford. She received her Adult Nurse Practitioner (ANP) degree from the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing. She has a BA in History from Pomona College. Juliana Liu has worked in the Pulmonary Hypertension field since 2002, and has presented at numerous nursing and patient conferences in the US and abroad. She has also served as member and chair on several committees of the Pulmonary Hypertension Association.

Latest information on COVID-19