School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 12 Results

  • David Lee, MD

    David Lee, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Novel treatments and devices for the treatment of valvular disease
    2. Alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy
    3. Novel approaches to coronary revascularization
    4. Closure devices for atrial septal defects and patent foramen ovale
    5. Novel treatments for hypertension

  • Eleanor Levin

    Eleanor Levin

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Eleanor Levin completed her undergraduate degree at Stanford, Phi Beta Kappa in Human Biology with Distinction, and her MD at UCSF as a Phi Beta Kappa Scholar. Her first internship was at Children's Hospital of San Francisco in pediatrics and her second at the Cleveland Clinic in internal medicine. She completed internal medicine training at Georgetown University and cardiology fellowship at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. At GW she undertook an advanced fellowship in echocardiography and lipids following her general cardiology fellowship. After fellowship training, Dr. Levin joined the GW faculty as an assistant professor of medicine in the Lipid Research Clinic. Subsequently she joined The Permanente Medical Group in northern California as a non-invasive cardiologist. She directed the Echocardiography Lab at Kaiser Santa Clara and introduced TEE and stress echo during her 25-year tenure. She introduced CT angiography of the heart at Santa Clara and coordinated joint readings between Radiology and Cardiology for 15 years. She created the Cholesterol Management and Heart Failure Programs initially at Santa Clara and eventually at more than 20 medical centers in Northern California. She was Kaiser's regional expert in lipidology as well as in cardiac disease in pregnancy in a patient population of 4 million. Dr. Levin served as Chief of Cardiology at Santa Clara for 16 years and as Chair of the Chiefs of Cardiology (120 cardiologists) for Northern California Kaiser for 8 years. She directed the Regional Cardiac Rehabilitation Program using home-based comprehensive rehabilitation across 18 medical centers for nearly three decades. During this time, she led teams developing cardiac guidelines embedded in order sets and electronic medical records throughout Kaiser medical centers to improve quality. She has spoken about and presented her work on population management and quality improvement nationally and internationally. Her awards include the national NCQA (National Committee of Quality Assurance) Award for Excellence in Cardiac Care, the Exceptional Contribution Award from The Permanente Medical Group for “exceptional work in care management programs” for heart failure and cholesterol management, the Santa Clara County Medical Association Outstanding Achievement Award for cardiac care management, and the Silicon Business Journal Award as one of the "Top 100 Influential Women in Silicon Valley." She is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. She is board certified in both Internal Medicine and in Cardiovascular Diseases by the American Board of Internal Medicine.
    Dr. Levin is a member of the Preventive Cardiology group. She participates in the Women’s Heart Health group and consults on pregnant patients with heart disease as requested. She sees general cardiology patients with lipid disorders and cardiovascular diseases of all types.

  • Eldrin F. Lewis, MD, MPH

    Eldrin F. Lewis, MD, MPH

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Lewis is a board-certified, fellowship-trained specialist in cardiovascular medicine. He is the chief of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and a professor of cardiovascular medicine.

    Dr. Lewis is an esteemed clinician-scientist who specializes in the care of patients with advanced heart failure. He is an internationally recognized expert on heart failure, heart transplant, and quality of life for heart failure patients. He cares deeply about his patients as well as his colleagues, the hospital, and the School of Medicine. Dr. Lewis is committed to diversity and inclusion, as well as expanding Stanford clinical research initiatives.

    A fundamental principle of Dr. Lewis’ practice is his belief that “there is more to life than death,” that cardiovascular care should go beyond helping patients survive to also helping them enjoy the best possible quality of life.

    Dr. Lewis has deep expertise in conducting clinical trials examining diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to heart failure. He has done innovative work to create systems for incorporating quality of life measures for cardiovascular patients into electronic health records. This research has received support from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and the National Institutes of Health.

    Much of his quality of life research has focused on patient-reported outcomes. Dr. Lewis emphasizes the importance of looking at how a disease, whether chronic or acute, impacts people’s ability to function and perform their activities of daily living. Strategies to improve patients’ well-being focus not only on their physical symptoms but also on depression, anxiety, exercise capacity, and ability to function in daily living.

    Dr. Lewis’ commitment to expanding clinical research initiatives will give patients more opportunities to participate in the clinical trials and access the latest care strategies that can translate into better outcomes. The goal is early access to the most advanced technology, pharmacology, and device therapy that can change outcomes for the better. He also envisions forming closer partnerships with community cardiologists and capitalizing further on Stanford’s proximity to and unique relationships with the digital technology leaders of Silicon Valley to enhance the use of digital technology for monitoring patients, optimizing treatment, and tracking outcomes.

    He has authored nearly 200 articles published in peer-reviewed journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Circulation, JAMA Cardiology, JAMA Internal Medicine, and many more. He is also on multiple editorial boards for cardiovascular journals and was an associate editor for Circulation–Heart Failure. In addition, he is an author of professional society clinical practice guidelines and scientific statements from both the American Heart Association (AHA) and the Food and Drug Administration.

    Dr. Lewis’ honors for clinical care, scholarship, and research include the Joel Gordon Miller Award for community service and leadership from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He also was one of the first recipients of the Minority Faculty Development Award, which recognizes the research potential of young physicians. Dr. Lewis has received a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to study the role of quality of life assessment in clinical decision making in patients with heart failure.

    He is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the National American Heart Association (AHA) Research Committee. In addition, Dr. Lewis was as a member of the AHA Founders Affiliate Board of Directors, chair of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, and research chair of the Association of Black Cardiologists. He also serves on scientific committees to review grants for the AHA and on the FDA Task Force for the Standardization of Definitions for Endpoint Events in Cardiovascular Trials.

  • David Liang, MD, PhD

    David Liang, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Bio Stanford researchers are creating a micro-device that physicians could guide through the body to help diagnose and treat clogged arteries and other diseases. Tethered to the outside world by a thin wire, a tiny machine creeps through blood vessels, searching out deadly plaques and obliterating them with a zap of a laser. While a laser will come later, for now David Liang, MD, PhD, is focusing on a tiny eye that could give physicians an unprecedented view into blood vessels.

  • Ronglih Liao

    Ronglih Liao

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Bio Dr. Liao is a Professor of Medicine and co-Director of Stanford Cardiac Amyloid Center. The major goal of her research program focuses on understanding the mechanisms that underlie the pathophysiology of heart failure and developing novel treatments to combat this process. Her laboratory has played an international leading role in the study of amyloid light chain (AL) cardiomyopathy, a rare and fatal form of cardiovascular disease. We have described the underlying pathophysiologic basis for amyloid cardiomyopathy and found that the circulating amyloidogenic light chain proteins that characterize this disease directly result in a specific cardiotoxic response. Consequently, our research work has redefined AL cardiomyopathy and has raised new treatment approaches. More recently, her research efforts have expanded to include transthyretin (ATTR) cardiac amyloidosis.

    In line with her goal of revealing novel therapeutic strategies for patients with cardiovascular disease, our efforts have also focused on characterizing and harnessing endogenous cardiac regenerative mechanisms. Her laboratory initially demonstrated the therapeutic potential of exogenous primitive muscle cells delivered to the injured heart. This work was among the earliest milestones in the field and served as the basis for an international trial of cell-based therapy. Subsequently, Liao lab identified and characterized a population of cardiac progenitor cells and its relationship and dynamic activity following cardiac injury in the adult heart. Her laboratory aims to reveal the molecular mechanisms regulating the endogenous regenerative capacity of the heart and to harness such repair mechanisms for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Dr. Liao has lectured extensively on both amyloid cardiomyopathy and stem cell biology, and have maintained a history of independent NIH funding in these areas for more than two decades.

    Over the course of her academic career, she has taken the greatest pride in mentoring the next generation of scientists. Dr. Liao has had the privilege to supervise several dozen students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty, many of whom have gone on to independent academic careers at the highest institutions. Her contribution to the advancement of scientific knowledge also includes lecturing at various university and academic institutions as well as at scores of conferences and symposia locally, nationally, and internationally.

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