School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 13 Results

  • Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor (Research) of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Michael S. Kapiloff is a faculty member in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and a member of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. Although Dr. Kapiloff was at one time a Board-Certified General Pediatrician, he is currently involved in full-time basic science and translational research. His laboratory studies the basic molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the retinal ganglion cell and cardiac myocyte to disease. The longstanding interest of his laboratory is the role in intracellular signal transduction of multimolecular complexes organized by scaffold proteins. Recently, his lab has also been involved in the translation of these concepts into new therapies, including the development of new AAV gene therapy biologics for the prevention and treatment of heart failure and for neuroprotection in the eye.

    URL to NCBI listing of all published works:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/michael.kapiloff.1/bibliography/40252285/public/?sort=date&direction=descending

    For more information see Dr. Kapiloff's lab website: http://med.stanford.edu/kapilofflab.html

  • Masataka Kawana

    Masataka Kawana

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Dr. Kawana joined the Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology group in 2018 as an Instructor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. He completed his internal medicine, cardiovascular medicine, and heart failure training at Stanford. He also completed a postdoctoral research fellowship under Dr. James Spudich in the Department of Biochemistry. He sees advanced heart failure patients in the clinic and attends CCU/heart failure service, and post-heart transplant and MCS service. His research interests are in the fundamental mechanism of inherited cardiomyopathies, and he studies the effect of gene mutation on the cardiac sarcomere function using cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical approaches, which would lead to the development of novel pharmacotherapy that directly modulates cardiac muscle protein. He is involved in multiple clinical trials for pharmacotherapy in inherited cardiomyopathy and also conducting a device study in heart failure.

  • Abha Khandelwal

    Abha Khandelwal

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiovascular disease in Pregnancy
    Valvular Heart Disease
    Cardiomyopathy
    Pericardial disease
    Heart Disease in South Asians
    Women's Cardiovascular Disease

  • Kiran Kaur Khush, MD

    Kiran Kaur Khush, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Khush'’s clinical research interests include the evaluation of donors and recipients for heart transplantation; mechanisms of adverse outcomes after heart transplantation, including cardiac allograft vasculopathy and antibody-mediated rejection; and development of non-invasive diagnostic approaches for post-transplant monitoring.

  • Gloria Kim

    Gloria Kim

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Medical education
    Health services delivery
    Management of chronic disease
    Patient and physician satisfaction

  • Juyong Brian Kim

    Juyong Brian Kim

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The lifetime risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) is determined by the genetic makeup and exposure to modifiable risk factors. My research laboratory is interested in understanding how various environmental pollutants (eg. tobacco, e-cigarettes, air pollution and wildfire) interact with genes to affect the transcriptome, epigenome, and eventually disease phenotype of CVD. The current focus is to investigate how different toxic exposures can adversely remodel the vascular wall leading to increased cardiac events. We intersect human genomic discoveries with animal models of disease, in-vitro and in-vivo systems of exposure, single-cell sequencing technologies to solve these questions. Additionally, we collaborate with various members of the Stanford community to develop biomarkers that will aid with detection and prognosis of CVD. We are passionate about the need to reduce the environmental effects on health through strong advocacy and outreach.

Latest information on COVID-19